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Good news: Ikea coming
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optik404



Joined: 24 Jun 2008

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 5:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

atwood wrote:
optik404 wrote:
radcon wrote:
Foreign stores such as H&M, Zara,Uniqlo, and Costco made their reputations by offering nice, quality products at very reasonable prices. However when these stores enter the Korean market, the reasonable price factor seems to go out the window. I imagine the same will happen with Ikea.


Uniqlo and h&m are pretty cheap in Korea.

But not as cheap as in the U.S., even when sales tax is factored in. But I would still consider them reasonable.

Costco, on the other hand, has prices on many items that are much higher. For example, for muffins you get two packages for the same price as you get one in Korea. I can understand duties making alcohol more expensive, but I wonder why fruit and nuts have to be almost twice as expensive.

Whatever the market will bear, I guess.


Everything is cheaper in the US. Why even compare.
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KimchiNinja



Joined: 01 May 2012
Location: Gangnam

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 5:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't like cheap stuff.

Costco, Ikea, just send it straight from the factory line to the garbage pile.
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Steelrails



Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Location: Earth, Solar System

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

atwood wrote:

It is just stuff. If you want to bastardize the English language go right ahead, but don't claim, wrongly as is your habit, that it's correct or in general usage.

The CORPUS OF CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN ENGLISH gives 476 examples of stuffs. Other than a few foodstuffs, all other examples are verbs.

And as mentioned above, it's Konglish. Koreans have problems with plurals and often pluralize words that are already plural such as staffs for staff members. You've got a lot of stuff to learn.


Dude, its called slang and casual speaking. Of course its incorrect and its not in general usage.

No, its not Konglish. It's like a blend of hillbilly and ebonics. I'm sorry I should have put a 'z' instead of an 's' to make it proper. 'Stuffz'.

Sometimes you speak the King's English. Sometimes you talk corner or trailer. Dave's is a place where you can talk both.

Lighten up Francis and go have some grape drank.
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Gnawbert



Joined: 23 Oct 2007
Location: The Internet

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've heard of stuffs used as a noun plenty of times. Is it correct? No, but now Google and tweet are verbs and nouns so... whatever. Stuffs is is the best way I'd describe everything from Ikea, down to their horse-meat meatballs, which I find rather tasty.

Quote:
Food·stuff noun \ˈfüd-ˌstəf\

Definition of FOODSTUFF

: a substance with food value; specifically : the raw material of food before or after processing

See: foodstuff defined for English-language learners »
See: foodstuff defined for kids »
First Known Use of FOODSTUFF:
1872
Rhymes with FOODSTUFF

breadstuff, cream puff, dyestuff, earmuff, enough, feedstuff, greenstuff, handcuff, hang tough, hot stuff, kid stuff, Pine Bluff, rebuff, small stuff.

Source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/foodstuff



I'm no fan of Ikea, but I do hope they can at least challenge the prices of Korean furniture. I've been appalled by the cost of a sofa here, especially for the low quality material they're often made of.
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atwood



Joined: 26 Dec 2009

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 11:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steelrails wrote:
atwood wrote:

It is just stuff. If you want to bastardize the English language go right ahead, but don't claim, wrongly as is your habit, that it's correct or in general usage.

The CORPUS OF CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN ENGLISH gives 476 examples of stuffs. Other than a few foodstuffs, all other examples are verbs.

And as mentioned above, it's Konglish. Koreans have problems with plurals and often pluralize words that are already plural such as staffs for staff members. You've got a lot of stuff to learn.


Dude, its called slang and casual speaking. Of course its incorrect and its not in general usage.

No, its not Konglish. It's like a blend of hillbilly and ebonics. I'm sorry I should have put a 'z' instead of an 's' to make it proper. 'Stuffz'.

Sometimes you speak the King's English. Sometimes you talk corner or trailer. Dave's is a place where you can talk both.

Lighten up Francis and go have some grape drank.

It's Konglish. It's not slang.

Besides, what do you know about how hillbillies and black people speak? What you've seen at the movies?

Just stop talking out of your hat and admit your error. Instead of lightening up with a kid's drink, why not man up--there's your slang.
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Steelrails



Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Location: Earth, Solar System

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 11:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

atwood wrote:

It's Konglish. It's not slang.

Besides, what do you know about how hillbillies and black people speak? What you've seen at the movies?

Just stop talking out of your hat and admit your error. Instead of lightening up with a kid's drink, why not man up--there's your slang.


When said by a Korean, its Konglish. When said by someone from back home, its just the way peoples speak.

You know like "Me and my peoples" rather than "Me and my people". Haven't you ever listened to a rap song? This wasn't some essay. This was a 2 line post on Dave's blasting IKEA.

I grew up on a farm and my roommate of 5 years was black and half my coworkers were black, the other half were trailer/redneck.

For the jury- Say these lines with the appropriate accent. Does it fly?


"Yo get yo stuffs off my desk".

"Ya'll better get your stuffs outta the truck".



And it's not drink. It's drank.

Lighten up Francis.
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Captain Corea



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 11:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

atwood wrote:
Steelrails wrote:
atwood wrote:

It is just stuff. If you want to bastardize the English language go right ahead, but don't claim, wrongly as is your habit, that it's correct or in general usage.

The CORPUS OF CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN ENGLISH gives 476 examples of stuffs. Other than a few foodstuffs, all other examples are verbs.

And as mentioned above, it's Konglish. Koreans have problems with plurals and often pluralize words that are already plural such as staffs for staff members. You've got a lot of stuff to learn.


Dude, its called slang and casual speaking. Of course its incorrect and its not in general usage.

No, its not Konglish. It's like a blend of hillbilly and ebonics. I'm sorry I should have put a 'z' instead of an 's' to make it proper. 'Stuffz'.

Sometimes you speak the King's English. Sometimes you talk corner or trailer. Dave's is a place where you can talk both.

Lighten up Francis and go have some grape drank.

It's Konglish. It's not slang.

Besides, what do you know about how hillbillies and black people speak? What you've seen at the movies?

Just stop talking out of your hat and admit your error. Instead of lightening up with a kid's drink, why not man up--there's your slang.


I've never heard Koreans use it. Can't say I'd call it Konglish.

Foodstuff

Craftstuff
Homestuff
Motorstuff

Sure, those last ones are incorrect, but I could see them being names of business and the like - and people understanding them. You seem to simply want to call out SR on this... and ignore that others are not bothered by it.

Me thinks this has more to do with your feelings about a poster than what is posted.
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atwood



Joined: 26 Dec 2009

PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2013 1:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Captain Corea wrote:
atwood wrote:
Steelrails wrote:
atwood wrote:

It is just stuff. If you want to bastardize the English language go right ahead, but don't claim, wrongly as is your habit, that it's correct or in general usage.

The CORPUS OF CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN ENGLISH gives 476 examples of stuffs. Other than a few foodstuffs, all other examples are verbs.

And as mentioned above, it's Konglish. Koreans have problems with plurals and often pluralize words that are already plural such as staffs for staff members. You've got a lot of stuff to learn.


Dude, its called slang and casual speaking. Of course its incorrect and its not in general usage.

No, its not Konglish. It's like a blend of hillbilly and ebonics. I'm sorry I should have put a 'z' instead of an 's' to make it proper. 'Stuffz'.

Sometimes you speak the King's English. Sometimes you talk corner or trailer. Dave's is a place where you can talk both.

Lighten up Francis and go have some grape drank.

It's Konglish. It's not slang.

Besides, what do you know about how hillbillies and black people speak? What you've seen at the movies?

Just stop talking out of your hat and admit your error. Instead of lightening up with a kid's drink, why not man up--there's your slang.


I've never heard Koreans use it. Can't say I'd call it Konglish.

Foodstuff

Craftstuff
Homestuff
Motorstuff

Sure, those last ones are incorrect, but I could see them being names of business and the like - and people understanding them. You seem to simply want to call out SR on this... and ignore that others are not bothered by it.

Me thinks this has more to do with your feelings about a poster than what is posted.

That's partially correct. But it's also that his explanations are inane and are the kind of half-baked information too many foreign "teachers" in Korea foist upon unsuspecting students.

And unless he's black, the peoples thing is just posing.
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optik404



Joined: 24 Jun 2008

PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2013 2:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I see atwood has a hard-on for SR. It's cute seeing him picking a fight over a word.
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Captain Corea



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2013 2:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lets drop it, guys. we already lost one thread today to personal scraps (of which I was a contributor).
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atwood



Joined: 26 Dec 2009

PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2013 5:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

optik404 wrote:
I see atwood has a hard-on for SR. It's cute seeing him picking a fight over a word.

Optik sees--that's cute.
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Steelrails



Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Location: Earth, Solar System

PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2013 7:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

atwood wrote:
Captain Corea wrote:
atwood wrote:
Steelrails wrote:
atwood wrote:

It is just stuff. If you want to bastardize the English language go right ahead, but don't claim, wrongly as is your habit, that it's correct or in general usage.

The CORPUS OF CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN ENGLISH gives 476 examples of stuffs. Other than a few foodstuffs, all other examples are verbs.

And as mentioned above, it's Konglish. Koreans have problems with plurals and often pluralize words that are already plural such as staffs for staff members. You've got a lot of stuff to learn.


Dude, its called slang and casual speaking. Of course its incorrect and its not in general usage.

No, its not Konglish. It's like a blend of hillbilly and ebonics. I'm sorry I should have put a 'z' instead of an 's' to make it proper. 'Stuffz'.

Sometimes you speak the King's English. Sometimes you talk corner or trailer. Dave's is a place where you can talk both.

Lighten up Francis and go have some grape drank.

It's Konglish. It's not slang.

Besides, what do you know about how hillbillies and black people speak? What you've seen at the movies?

Just stop talking out of your hat and admit your error. Instead of lightening up with a kid's drink, why not man up--there's your slang.


I've never heard Koreans use it. Can't say I'd call it Konglish.

Foodstuff

Craftstuff
Homestuff
Motorstuff

Sure, those last ones are incorrect, but I could see them being names of business and the like - and people understanding them. You seem to simply want to call out SR on this... and ignore that others are not bothered by it.

Me thinks this has more to do with your feelings about a poster than what is posted.

That's partially correct. But it's also that his explanations are inane and are the kind of half-baked information too many foreign "teachers" in Korea foist upon unsuspecting students.

And unless he's black, the peoples thing is just posing.


Pick your battles atwood. This rite here...not the best hound to kick...

Lighten up Francis.
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atwood



Joined: 26 Dec 2009

PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2013 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steelrails wrote:
atwood wrote:
Captain Corea wrote:
atwood wrote:
Steelrails wrote:
atwood wrote:

It is just stuff. If you want to bastardize the English language go right ahead, but don't claim, wrongly as is your habit, that it's correct or in general usage.

The CORPUS OF CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN ENGLISH gives 476 examples of stuffs. Other than a few foodstuffs, all other examples are verbs.

And as mentioned above, it's Konglish. Koreans have problems with plurals and often pluralize words that are already plural such as staffs for staff members. You've got a lot of stuff to learn.


Dude, its called slang and casual speaking. Of course its incorrect and its not in general usage.

No, its not Konglish. It's like a blend of hillbilly and ebonics. I'm sorry I should have put a 'z' instead of an 's' to make it proper. 'Stuffz'.

Sometimes you speak the King's English. Sometimes you talk corner or trailer. Dave's is a place where you can talk both.

Lighten up Francis and go have some grape drank.

It's Konglish. It's not slang.

Besides, what do you know about how hillbillies and black people speak? What you've seen at the movies?

Just stop talking out of your hat and admit your error. Instead of lightening up with a kid's drink, why not man up--there's your slang.


I've never heard Koreans use it. Can't say I'd call it Konglish.

Foodstuff

Craftstuff
Homestuff
Motorstuff

Sure, those last ones are incorrect, but I could see them being names of business and the like - and people understanding them. You seem to simply want to call out SR on this... and ignore that others are not bothered by it.

Me thinks this has more to do with your feelings about a poster than what is posted.

That's partially correct. But it's also that his explanations are inane and are the kind of half-baked information too many foreign "teachers" in Korea foist upon unsuspecting students.

And unless he's black, the peoples thing is just posing.


Pick your battles atwood. This rite here...not the best hound to kick...

Lighten up Francis.

Ignorance in any shape or form is worth battling. Also pretense.
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KimchiNinja



Joined: 01 May 2012
Location: Gangnam

PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2013 7:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Captain Corea wrote:
Lets drop it, guys. we already lost one thread today to personal scraps (of which I was a contributor).


What?! I missed all the fun. Sad
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dairyairy



Joined: 17 May 2012
Location: South Korea

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

FWIW it seems that Ikea wants to enter the Korean market, later this year, with their first three major stores already approved. This must be for political reasons after seeing how Costco's growth has been limited by the Korean government in the name of protectionism.


http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/article.aspx?aid=2983108&cloc=joongangdaily|home|newslist2

Quote:
A third branch of Sweden’s famous Ikea furniture store could be set up in southeastern Seoul as early as 2017.

Ikea’s first two Korean stores are scheduled to open in Gyeonggi in the second half of this year and in two to three years. According to the Gangdong District government yesterday, Ikea has expressed its intention to buy 13,000 square meters (3.21 acres) of land in Godeuk commercial zone, southeastern Seoul.

The local government is still negotiating with the Swedish company. Even if the local government inks an agreement with Ikea in the first half of this year, final approval from the Seoul City government is required.

Ikea announced it would enter the Korean market in late 2011.

After a six-month negotiation with the local government of Gwangmyeong in western Gyeonggi, south of the Han River, the Swedish company received approval to open its first branch in August. The first store is scheduled to open in the second half of the year on a 78,000-square-meter plot of land next to the Gwangmyeong KTX station.

Four months after that approval, Ikea Korea announced late last month that it had bought a 51,200-square-meter plot of land in Goyang, Gyeonggi, northwest of the Han River, for its second branch.

This was an unusual move because Ikea usually decides on a second branch in a country after monitoring its first branch for two or three years.

While the first two branches are expected to attract customers in the western part of greater Seoul, the third branch, although smaller in size, is expected to attract customers in the eastern Seoul area, including Bundang.

Local governments such as Gangdong expect Ikea to boost their regional economies.

However, approval from the Seoul government is uncertain because it always worries that retail giants like Ikea could have a negative impact on smaller merchants and furniture businesses.


BTW, what Korean companies sell quality furniture in Korea? So who are they "protecting" from Ikea? Sounds like the same tune the government is whistling about Costco and other large companies.
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