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Canadian 3-year General Degree
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Wovaki



Joined: 28 Sep 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 1:54 pm    Post subject: Canadian 3-year General Degree Reply with quote

Hi Guys!

I was just wondering if I can teach English in Korea with a 3-year "General" BA degree from a Canadian university? And, if I can, will it lower my job prospects because it's not a 4-year degree?

A lot of recruitment websites say "4-year degrees" so it made me worried about whether mine (a 3-year) will be fine or not.

Thanks!

Rob
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ttompatz



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Location: Kwangju, South Korea

PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As long as the degree parchment says, "Bachelor of _____" you are good to go and it makes no difference.

.
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Wovaki



Joined: 28 Sep 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ttompatz wrote:
As long as the degree parchment says, "Bachelor of _____" you are good to go and it makes no difference.

.


I believe it will say either "General Bachelor of Arts" or "Bachelor of Arts (General" will that make a difference at all?

I was also curious whether employers might look down on a 3-year, even if it's accepted? I know Korea is very competitive and education is extremely important to them.

Thanks!

Rob
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Ribena



Joined: 07 Apr 2011
Location: UK

PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lots of English people who teach in Korea will have a 3 year degree and that doesn't cause them a problem. They probably won't even think about it.
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ttompatz



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Location: Kwangju, South Korea

PostPosted: Wed Dec 18, 2013 4:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wovaki wrote:
ttompatz wrote:
As long as the degree parchment says, "Bachelor of _____" you are good to go and it makes no difference.

.


I believe it will say either "General Bachelor of Arts" or "Bachelor of Arts (General" will that make a difference at all?

I was also curious whether employers might look down on a 3-year, even if it's accepted? I know Korea is very competitive and education is extremely important to them.

Thanks!

Rob


It could say Bachelor of Arts in Basket Weaving ... as long as it is a bachelor's degree.....

If you want to work in a public (k-12) school then get a TESOL/TEFL/TESL cert along the way (make sure it has at LEAST 20 hours of in class time (purely on-line certs no longer cut it)).

.
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Wovaki



Joined: 28 Sep 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Jan 03, 2014 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for all the replies everyone! My biggest worry was being turned down because my degree is a 3-year degree and not a 4-year. A lot of the recruiter websites say 4-year degree so I was worried.

I also was talking with my TESOL instructor who also helps to place people into jobs and when I mentioned that I had a 3 year degree he said that he inly dealt with people with 4-year degrees and that he wasn't sure if a 3-year was fine.

Has anyone gotten into Korea with a 3 year? Can i do both public and private schools with a 3 year degree?

Thanks!

Rob
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Who's Your Daddy?



Joined: 30 May 2010
Location: The joy's in the ride.

PostPosted: Fri Jan 03, 2014 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A 3-year only matters if you tell them.
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drcrazy



Joined: 19 Feb 2003
Location: Pusan. Yes, that's right. Pusan NOT Busan. I ain't never been to no place called Busan

PostPosted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 2:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What if someone changed their major a time or two, and it took them 6 years to graduate? Do you now call that a 6 year degree and can not be used to teach here because 6 years is not 4 years? Or maybe someone worked their way threw college and was only part time and it took 8 years to get the BA. Do you now call that an 8 year degree and can not be used to teach here because 8 years is not 4 years?

No one cares how long it took you to get a BA. If you got it, you got it.

How would anyone even know unless they saw dates on your transcript, which is no longer required for an E-2. For E-1 sealed transcripts are required.
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drcrazy



Joined: 19 Feb 2003
Location: Pusan. Yes, that's right. Pusan NOT Busan. I ain't never been to no place called Busan

PostPosted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 2:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wovaki wrote:
ttompatz wrote:
As long as the degree parchment says, "Bachelor of _____" you are good to go and it makes no difference.

.


I believe it will say either "General Bachelor of Arts" or "Bachelor of Arts (General" will that make a difference at all?

I was also curious whether employers might look down on a 3-year, even if it's accepted? I know Korea is very competitive and education is extremely important to them.

Thanks!

Rob


Yes that would make a HUGE difference. 1. With "General Bachelor of Arts" the first word in the title is "General" 2. With "Bachelor of Arts General" the last word in the title is "General".

*****IN THE NAME OF GOD, PRAY THE WORD ORDER ON IT IS CORRECT.

***** Word order preferences may vary from one immigration to another, and EVEN in the same immigration it can depend on who is looking at it.
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I'm With You



Joined: 01 Sep 2011

PostPosted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OP,

It's all a crap shoot.
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Wovaki



Joined: 28 Sep 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you guys know anybody who has been rejected for having the 3 year degree instead of the 4 year?

Thanks!

Rob
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Ginormousaurus



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Location: 700 Ft. Pulpit

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

drcrazy wrote:
What if someone changed their major a time or two, and it took them 6 years to graduate? Do you now call that a 6 year degree and can not be used to teach here because 6 years is not 4 years? Or maybe someone worked their way threw college and was only part time and it took 8 years to get the BA. Do you now call that an 8 year degree and can not be used to teach here because 8 years is not 4 years?


I'm not sure if you're willfully misunderstanding the OP or not, but I'll explain:

Most undergrad degrees would typically take 4 years to complete. Of course this can vary, but for the most part it will take at least 4 years (not less). We don't refer to these as "four-year degrees" because the vast majority of undergrad degrees take four years and so it is implied.

The OP's situation is a bit different. His degree was a 3-year degree. Without knowing any more about it, one might assume that since it only takes 3 years to complete, it may not be as rigorous as the standard 4-year degree that is the norm. Since most undergrad degrees take 4 years to complete and his only took 3 years (possibly because of less content), he was concerned that his degree may not be accepted.

Nobody who takes 6 years to complete an undergrad degree refers to it as a "6 year degree".

I get the feeling you knew all this already. Wink


Last edited by Ginormousaurus on Tue Jan 07, 2014 12:24 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Wovaki



Joined: 28 Sep 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ginormousaurus wrote:

I'm not sure if you're willfully misunderstanding the OP or not, but explain:

Most undergrad degrees would typically take 4 years to complete. Of course this can vary, but for the most part it will take at least 4 years (not less). We don't refer to these as "four-year degrees" because the vast majority of undergrad degrees take four years and so it is implied.

The OP's situation is a bit different. His degree was a 3-year degree. Without knowing any more about it, one might assume that since it only takes 3 years to complete, it may not be as rigorous as the standard 4-year degree that is the norm. Since most undergrad degrees take 4 years to complete and his only took 3 years (possibly because of less content), he was concerned that his degree may not be accepted.

Nobody who takes 6 years to complete an undergrad degree refers to it as a "6 year degree".

I get the feeling you knew all this already. Wink


Exactly. Smile

The 4th year is left off. Which means about 10 classes or so. I don't know about other universities, but mine does name courses by year. COSC4XXX is a 4th year course, so I generally wouldn't take any of those courses until my 4th year of study, unless I decided to under load or overload my courses, in which case I could take those classes sooner or later. Wink

Basically, I don't write a thesis or take part in any of the 4th year courses.

I do, however, get your point drcrazy. But the wording of the degree will change based on whether it's a 3 or 4 year. In Canada, a 4-year degree is an "honours bachelor's" and a 3-year is a "general bachelor's."

And transcripts are still required for the E2 VISA in Canada. Smile
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ttompatz



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Location: Kwangju, South Korea

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And again, provided the parchment says "Bachelor of ______" it makes NO DIFFERENCE insofar as immigration or the consulate are concerned.

.
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Numpty



Joined: 19 Dec 2013

PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2014 2:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ginormousaurus wrote:
drcrazy wrote:
What if someone changed their major a time or two, and it took them 6 years to graduate? Do you now call that a 6 year degree and can not be used to teach here because 6 years is not 4 years? Or maybe someone worked their way threw college and was only part time and it took 8 years to get the BA. Do you now call that an 8 year degree and can not be used to teach here because 8 years is not 4 years?


I'm not sure if you're willfully misunderstanding the OP or not, but I'll explain:

Most undergrad degrees would typically take 4 years to complete. Of course this can vary, but for the most part it will take at least 4 years (not less). We don't refer to these as "four-year degrees" because the vast majority of undergrad degrees take four years and so it is implied.

I don't know about the UK or South Africa but in Oz and NZ almost all undergrad degrees are three-year degrees. And there's no problem with those being accepted in Korea. The only ones I can think of off the top of my head which aren't three-year degrees in Oz and NZ are law, medicine and engineering.
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