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Korea's frusterating lack of whole grains....bread delivery?
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itiswhatitis



Joined: 08 Aug 2011

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 4:38 am    Post subject: Korea's frusterating lack of whole grains....bread delivery? Reply with quote

Hopefully when I make a visit to Korea as an old man they will FINALLY be eating more whole grains. Some of the E-Marts have recently started selling oatmeal, Costco has Oatmeal and Whole Grain Roman bread (IF you live near a Costco) and I've seen Whole Grain Roman Bread and Oatmeal at Lotte and Hyandai department stores (if you happen to live near one). Whole grains seem to be considered somewhat of a luxery item that are catered to wealthy and educated Koreans who are likely to have lived/studied abroad. In Canada/America etc whole grains are pretty much standard at any somewhat respectable supermarket.

For oatmeal and whole grain pasta I order from Iherb but what about for whole grain bread? There must be a bakery that sells whole grain bread and that will deliver. I'm thinking of getting a few loaves at a time (my fridge has a descent sized frezer to freeze the bread).

Any suggestions for getting whole grain bread delivered?
I live in Yongin btw.

As an aside.......(and I don't mean to take a shot at Korea).....why are Koreans so slow to start eating whole grains? Any thoughts? Smoking rates have dropped signifincantly in the past decades, gyms are ubiquitous in most neighbourhoods and they have first rate internet and public transportation.

My theory: whole grains would be replacing something that is considered Korean whereas things like smart phones and gyms are adding and not replacing.
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schwa



Joined: 18 Jan 2003
Location: sokcho

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 5:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many Paris Baguette outlets offer a solid loaf of sourdough rye & there are health food stores here & there with organic whole grain bread. Seek & ye shall find. (This from a town much smaller than Yongin.)
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nicwr2002



Joined: 17 Aug 2011

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 5:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is because rice is the staple food here not bread. Bread is considered a snack here.
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Kepler



Joined: 24 Sep 2007

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 6:35 am    Post subject: Re: Korea's frusterating lack of whole grains....bread deliv Reply with quote

itiswhatitis wrote:
Hopefully when I make a visit to Korea as an old man they will FINALLY be eating more whole grain.

I think that Korea would be better off not embracing whole grain propaganda.

"It’s all nonsense, of course, but whole grain propaganda is still annoyingly pervasive. Even educated people who should know better still fall hook line and sinker for the totally unfounded whole grain health claims. Recently, I received an email from one Jane Karlsson, PhD, vigorously asserting that whole grains were wonderfully healthy foods that could immensely benefit humankind. I wrote back and told Jane she was wrong and challenged her to back her assertions with some real clinical evidence. The following exchange is reprinted below."
http://anthonycolpo.com/the-whole-grain-scam/
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yodanole



Joined: 02 Mar 2003
Location: La Florida

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can get popcorn almost anywhere...
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crescent



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Location: yes.

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

schwa wrote:
Many Paris Baguette outlets offer a solid loaf of sourdough rye & there are health food stores here & there with organic whole grain bread. Seek & ye shall find. (This from a town much smaller than Yongin.)

Yeah, I see Whole wheat in every single Tous Les Jours, Paris Baguette, and every department store bakery I've shopped in.

잡곡
통밀
호밀
곡물

If you shop after 6-7pm, however, you run a great risk of it being sold out.
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Deja



Joined: 18 Mar 2011

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 4:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you'd be better off buying a normal bag og OATS (they are awesome at E-Mart!) or whole rice or something similar. I like oats, and was looking for them before anything else, so I didn't check everything they have, even though I had years to do that Razz

Korea is not accepting bread in general... 12 years ago, all I could find, with an amaizing translator, was just some sweet corn bread (and as someone who ate WHITE bread until that point, I couldn't stomach any of it, and it was a great point in life, where I literally stopped eating breads Smile).
Korea had a campaign to reduce the consumption of rice, as a catalist for diabetes. And they aren't going for whole rice, because it takes longer to cook. That's what I was told by another good translator.

Works for me, though.
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Steelrails



Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Location: Earth, Solar System

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
As an aside.......(and I don't mean to take a shot at Korea).....why are Koreans so slow to start eating whole grains? Any thoughts? Smoking rates have dropped signifincantly in the past decades, gyms are ubiquitous in most neighbourhoods and they have first rate internet and public transportation.

My theory: whole grains would be replacing something that is considered Korean whereas things like smart phones and gyms are adding and not replacing.


My theory, not resenting people for what their culture eats and not expecting them to change their dietary habits in order to make YOU happy (in other words these people don't exist in order to make you happy), and changing that whole attitude will be far more beneficial to your stress levels, and thereby your overall health than any bowl of oatmeal.

You know what Koreans (and other immigrants) do overseas when they can't find something? They either grow it or they find the base ingredients and prepare it from scratch. They don't whine that the local Ralph's or Kroger's or Aldi doesn't carry Korean food X. Do the same.
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byrddogs



Joined: 19 Jun 2009
Location: Shanghai

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steelrails wrote:
My theory, not resenting people for what their culture eats and not expecting them to change their dietary habits in order to make YOU happy (in other words these people don't exist in order to make you happy), and changing that whole attitude will be far more beneficial to your stress levels, and thereby your overall health than any bowl of oatmeal.

You know what Koreans (and other immigrants) do overseas when they can't find something? They either grow it or they find the base ingredients and prepare it from scratch. They don't whine that the local Ralph's or Kroger's or Aldi doesn't carry Korean food X. Do the same.


They usually just box up a bunch of crap and take it with them or have it sent by relatives?
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crescent



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Location: yes.

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steelrails wrote:

My theory, not resenting people for what their culture eats and not expecting them to change their dietary habits in order to make YOU happy (in other words these people don't exist in order to make you happy), and changing that whole attitude will be far more beneficial to your stress levels, and thereby your overall health than any bowl of oatmeal.

You know what Koreans (and other immigrants) do overseas when they can't find something? They either grow it or they find the base ingredients and prepare it from scratch. They don't whine that the local Ralph's or Kroger's or Aldi doesn't carry Korean food X. Do the same.

Wow dont bust an artery.
He was obviously asking why Koreans aren't adopting more healthy grains that don't involve heavy processing since Koreans are showing more awareness and attention to healthier practices; not asking for changes to make him happy.

As usual, you respond with a poor comparison. Koreans abroad get their stuff shipped over if it's not available. Fortunately, most other countries offer a wider variety of choices so it's less of a problem.
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Captain Corea



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know that my in-laws have pretty much given up white rice for a "mixed" rice instead (not exactly sure what's in there, but it looks like husks, beans, and other stuff).
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drydell



Joined: 01 Oct 2009

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 10:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's cos Koreans associate bread with cake..
Whereas we would mostly think of bread more like rice- a staple savoury starch. Koreans have put it in the sugary dessert category - because... Err well I don't know - maybe cos it's western so it must have lots of sugar in it. That's why so much of the bread here is crap.. Buttery sugary stuff.. Sugar on garlic bread etc...

Good news is I think it's about to change- great new selection of fresh whole wheat breads in my Homeplus arrived recently...
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Epuhnee



Joined: 22 Apr 2010

PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can order the roman meal bread from Gmarket. Comes in packages of 3 loaves.

http://item2.gmarket.co.kr/English/detailview/item.aspx?goodscode=299972166
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Return Jones



Joined: 06 Feb 2004
Location: I will see you in far-off places

PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not sure where the confusion is coming from.... I'm not an apologist, but sometimes people tend to shortchange Korea when in actuality they just don't understand what's going on.

The rice aisle of any major grocery store in Korea has more whole grains than you would ever find in any western grocery store. Just put them in your rice cooker and voila!

Take a look at Gmarket:

http://search.gmarket.co.kr/search.aspx?selecturl=total&sheaderkey=&SearchClassFormWord=goodsSearch&keywordOrg=%C0%E2%B0%EE&keywordCVT=%C0%E2%B0%EE%2C%C0%E2%B0%EE%BC%B1%B9%B0%BC%BC%C6%AE&keywordCVTi=1&keyword=%C0%E2%B0%EE&x=0&y=0

If you're in Yongin, go to the Nonghyup supermarket at Ori station. More grains than you could ever imagine!
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Steelrails



Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Location: Earth, Solar System

PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 3:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

crescent wrote:

As usual, you respond with a poor comparison. Koreans abroad get their stuff shipped over if it's not available. Fortunately, most other countries offer a wider variety of choices so it's less of a problem.


If I want Korean stuff back home I either have to go to the Korean grocery or make do with a small rack of crappiness at the local Kroger or Ralph's. Sorry for a great many ethnicities out there they either use local ingredients and prepare things from scratch and trade them within their community OR they start an ethnic grocery. For Koreans in big cities, there is usually a Korean grocery. For those in small towns, you either have some stuff shipped or you make a once a month 6 hour car ride somewhere.

What they don't do is whine about how Americans aren't eating like them and upset that the local grocery store doesn't stock item X. They don't feel entitled to it. There is a world of difference in attitude between a person who asks "Where can I find whole grain products" vs. "Why aren't the people here into whole grains? When will they FINALLY eat more?" There is something in the attitude of the writer of the second sentence that suggests entitlement and a belief that the people of Korea exist to make him happy.
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