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Who Still Can't Eat at America's Table

 
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 11, 2014 12:09 am    Post subject: Who Still Can't Eat at America's Table Reply with quote

Americans have come a long way in their thinking since 1964. Does the fact that Americans have come so far suggest that continued education and vigilance is needed or have Americans reached a level of maturity where issues of equality are no longer needed?

Editor's note: Stephanie Coontz teaches at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington, and is director of research and public education at the Council on Contemporary Families.

(CNN) -- Fifty years ago today, the House of Representatives passed the Civil Rights Act, which made it illegal to discriminate against individuals on the basis of race, national origin, religion or gender. We've come a long way since then, according to a report issued last week by the Council on Contemporary Families. Yet troubling inequalities persist.
Gone are the days when segregationists in Congress proudly declared they would resist "social equality" and racial "intermingling" to "the bitter end," and when the head of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission flatly refused to enforce the act's provisions against gender discrimination.
In 1964, fewer than 5% of Americans approved of interracial marriage. Today, 77% do, according to a Gallup poll. In 1970, a majority of Americans still opposed efforts to end gender inequality. By 2010, 97% of Americans supported equal rights for women, according to the Pew Research Center.

You can read the rest of the article here: http://edition.cnn.com/2014/02/10/opinion/coontz-civil-rights-act/index.html?hpt=hp_t5
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