Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Korean Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

America is a Banana Republic
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... , 12, 13, 14  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Current Events Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
mises



Joined: 05 Nov 2007
Location: retired

PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/apr/03/us-bank-mexico-drug-gangs

Quote:
How a big US bank laundered billions from Mexico's murderous drug gangs

As the violence spread, billions of dollars of cartel cash began to seep into the global financial system. But a special investigation by the Observer reveals how the increasingly frantic warnings of one London whistleblower were ignored

On 10 April 2006, a DC-9 jet landed in the port city of Ciudad del Carmen, on the Gulf of Mexico, as the sun was setting. Mexican soldiers, waiting to intercept it, found 128 cases packed with 5.7 tons of cocaine, valued at $100m. But something else – more important and far-reaching – was discovered in the paper trail behind the purchase of the plane by the Sinaloa narco-trafficking cartel.

During a 22-month investigation by agents from the US Drug Enforcement Administration, the Internal Revenue Service and others, it emerged that the cocaine smugglers had bought the plane with money they had laundered through one of the biggest banks in the United States: Wachovia, now part of the giant Wells Fargo.

The authorities uncovered billions of dollars in wire transfers, traveller's cheques and cash shipments through Mexican exchanges into Wachovia accounts. Wachovia was put under immediate investigation for failing to maintain an effective anti-money laundering programme. Of special significance was that the period concerned began in 2004, which coincided with the first escalation of violence along the US-Mexico border that ignited the current drugs war.

Criminal proceedings were brought against Wachovia, though not against any individual, but the case never came to court. In March 2010, Wachovia settled the biggest action brought under the US bank secrecy act, through the US district court in Miami. Now that the year's "deferred prosecution" has expired, the bank is in effect in the clear. It paid federal authorities $110m in forfeiture, for allowing transactions later proved to be connected to drug smuggling, and incurred a $50m fine for failing to monitor cash used to ship 22 tons of cocaine.

More shocking, and more important, the bank was sanctioned for failing to apply the proper anti-laundering strictures to the transfer of $378.4bn – a sum equivalent to one-third of Mexico's gross national product – into dollar accounts from so-called casas de cambio (CDCs) in Mexico, currency exchange houses with which the bank did business.

"Wachovia's blatant disregard for our banking laws gave international cocaine cartels a virtual carte blanche to finance their operations," said Jeffrey Sloman, the federal prosecutor. Yet the total fine was less than 2% of the bank's $12.3bn profit for 2009. On 24 March 2010, Wells Fargo stock traded at $30.86 – up 1% on the week of the court settlement.

The conclusion to the case was only the tip of an iceberg, demonstrating the role of the "legal" banking sector in swilling hundreds of billions of dollars – the blood money from the murderous drug trade in Mexico and other places in the world – around their global operations, now bailed out by the taxpayer.


The real interesting information involves the other end of those accounts and what was done with the money. I hope we'll see more of this story.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
stilicho25



Joined: 05 Apr 2010

PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dude, don't be a tease. Where did the money go?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Space Bar



Joined: 20 Oct 2010

PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mises wrote:
Wild:

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7361572n

The banlsters should be hanged. The foreclosed should get back their homes.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Sun Dec 02, 2012 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.nsfwcorp.com/dispatch/journalism-as-vagrancy
Quote:
I was arrested on the night of November 30, 2011 in downtown Los Angeles while attempting to report on the LAPD's paramilitary eviction raid on Occupy LA. The shock and sweep operation was carried out by nearly 1,500 cops decked out in riot gear, many of them agitated for having to work on their off day, and itching for a fight. Something like 300 people were arrested with me that night, including two other journalists who were unexpectedly caught in the raid. One of them was a photojournalist named Tyson Header, who was brutally assaulted by a pack of stormtroopers for having the guts to protest their rough treatment of the press. The attack, which was caught on video, left Header's face a bloody and bruised mess.

I didn't get it so rough, but my experience was by no means pleasant.

A few hours before the raid, I got word that the LAPD was amassing a small army at Dodger Stadium. By the time I made my way from Venice to the Occupy LA encampment located on the lawn of City Hall in downtown LA, dozens of reporters had arrived on the scene. We were all shocked to learn of LAPD's brand new—and almost certainly illegal—press policy: All reporters who were not part of the "official press pool" were not allowed to report on the raid, and in fact would be arrested without question if they failed to leave the staging area. Official press pool? Turned out that the day before, the LAPD had selected a handful of local news organizations and given them permission to report on the action from an embedded position. If you weren't on the list, you weren't a journalist. It was that simple.

Most journalists complied, but I chose not to. The LAPD doesn't have any legal right to decide who is and who isn't a journalist, or to strip journalistic identity just because they fear negative coverage. So I stayed with the protesters behind police lines to continue my reporting, and was arrested along with everyone else.

Two cops zip-tied my hands behind my back and frogmarched me to a prisoner transport bus operated by the Los Angeles County Sheriff Department, which is infamous for the third-world brutality of its jail system, the largest in the country. There were 30 or 40 people on there, and we waited for about an hour until we were unloaded at the central city jail no more than 3 blocks away from City Hall. That entire time we listened to the piercing screams of a woman in an isolation cage at the front of the bus. She begged for someone to loosen her handcuffs, which were cutting into her skin. The guards were a few feet away from her cage, but did nothing. Everyone on that bus felt her pain—and I mean, we literally fucking felt it. The zip-tie handcuffs they used on us sliced into our flesh. It was like having our wrists garroted—which I think was the point. Intense constant pain is a pretty good way to incapacitate prisoners, if you ask me. It was impossible for us to resist, talk or do much of anything else other than squirm and fidget in our seats in pain. One of the guys on the bus already had a bloody gash forming on his wrists. Another's hands had turned a deep, almost black purple—the color of gangrene.

I spent the next two days locked up in the city's central jail. There were around a hundred of us there—all men. We spent the first night sleeping on the bare concrete floor of a secure internal prison garage, our hands handcuffed behind our back. We had no access to water or food for most of that time. People who had been hit with "less-lethal" bullets from shotguns or had been stomped and bloodied by amped-up cops in some other fashion were denied medical care. A guy who complained of a broken arm didn't get any medical attention. After a while he seemed to go catatonic from shock, and just stared straight ahead unresponsively. There was even a minor celebrity in there with us: Patrick Meighan, a writer for "Family Guy". His forehead was caked with blood—a souvenir from the LAPD, who thought it would be nice to plow the pavement with Patrick's head before frogmarching him out of the camp.

I found out from my cellies that a bunch of other people arrested during the raid had been sealed in a prison transport bus for seven hours without food, water or even bathroom breaks, forced to urinate in their seats. They remained sitting in their own piss, watching it mix together and splash around on the floor as the LA County Sheriff deputies drove the bus around the city. Hell, these boys clearly were in no rush, and even had time to stop for a late nite Pollo Loco snack break.

Later, they took away our shoelaces and crammed us into tiny holding cells. There was no place for most of us to sit or lie down, except on the grimy, urine-soaked floor. But most of us were so tired and sleep-deprived that we didn’t care. I remember waking up in daze on the floor near a toilet, looking up at a guy taking a piss no more than a few inches away from my head and then going right back to sleep again. I spent my last day passed out on a bunk with a thin jail blanket over my head to blot out the bright 24-hour fluorescent lights.


The guy opens the article with a recent quote from H. Clinton:

"Let me say publicly what I said privately earlier today: no person in any country should be detained for exercising universal freedoms of expression, assembly and conscience" —Hillary Clinton in Burma on December 1, 2011
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://edition.cnn.com/2013/02/08/us/lapd-attacks/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

See this picture of military (i mean Homeland Security - who recently bought a couple billion bullets) checkpoints on a LA free-way:

http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/130207195137-01-california-manhunt-0207-horizontal-gallery.jpg

First, note the chaos that one guy has brought to a city and the incredible overreaction by the state.

Second, read this: http://unqualified-reservations.blogspot.com/2013/02/charles-stross-discovers-cathedral.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
If you’re caught with an ounce of cocaine, the chances are good you’re gonna go to jail. If it happens repeatedly, you may go to jail for the rest of your life.

But evidently if you launder nearly a billion dollars for drug cartels and violate our international sanctions, your company pays a fine and you go home and sleep in your bed at night — every single individual associated with this. And I think that’s fundamentally wrong.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/07/elizabeth-warren-hsbc-money-laundering_n_2830166.html

Surprisingly, nobody looks into where the money went. Laundered it to where? To whom?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rollo



Joined: 10 May 2006
Location: China

PostPosted: Fri Mar 08, 2013 1:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I always look for the Chiquita sticker on the Bananas.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Sat May 04, 2013 5:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://rt.com/op-edge/moral-monstrosity-american-gulag-258/

Quote:
"According to reports issued by advocacy group Public Campaign, the three major corrections firms –Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), the GEO Group, and Cornell, have spent over $22 million lobbying Congress since 2001."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Kuros



Joined: 27 Apr 2004

PostPosted: Sat May 04, 2013 6:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's another The Atlantic article Titus will enjoy: The Case against Cronies

Timothy Carney wrote:
Naturally, all economic policies will help some interests and hurt others. Just because a company profits from a policy doesn't make it "crony capitalism." But when lawmakers go along with lobbyists' requests, they are often subordinating the public interest to private interests -- or at least showing more concern about the fate of the well-connected than the fate of the masses.

. . .

[H]ere's a quick primer of corporate-government collusion since George W. Bush's second term.

The 2005 and 2007 energy bills required drivers to buy ethanol, created a government loan-guarantee program for private sector green-energy projects, and effectively outlawed the traditional incandescent light bulb. Ethanol and the green-energy finance programs are pretty naked corporate welfare. General Electric and the light-bulb industry lobby supported the light-bulb law, which forces consumers to buy higher-profit-margin high-tech bulbs.

Then, 2008 saw an avalanche of corporate bailouts: Bear Stearns, AIG, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Then the TARP bailed out all of Wall Street, and later General Motors and Chrysler.

Obama came to power in 2009 and signed an $800 billion stimulus bill supported by the Chamber of Commerce and loaded with goodies for the likes of Google and Solyndra. Obama pushed cap-and-trade with the support of the U.S. Climate Action Partnership, a corporate coalition led by GE, which had set up a business to create and trade greenhouse-gas credits.

In June 2009, Obama signed the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, a regulatory measure that Philip Morris supported and reportedly helped write -- smaller competitors called it the "Marlboro Monopoly Act." That same month, Wal-Mart, the country's largest private-sector employer, publicly endorsed the employer mandate in health insurance that became part of Obamacare. The drug lobby wrote significant parts of Obamacare, and the hospital lobby liked the bill enough to file an amicus curiae brief with the Court defending the law from its challenge by states and the small business lobby.

Boeing and the Chamber of Commerce launched a full-court lobbying push in 2011 to save and expand the Export-Import Bank, the government agency Obama loves using to subsidize U.S. Exports -- including lots of Boeing jets. In a lesser-known case of regulatory profiteering, Obama hired H&R Block's CEO to a top position at the IRS, where he crafted new regulations on tax preparers -- rules which H&R Block supported and small tax preparers sued to overturn.

There are dozens of examples in recent years that fit a pattern worrisome to free-marketeers: big business pursuing profit by lobbying for more spending and stricter regulations.


Carney then describes how firms which rely on government support become infirm. He then asks us to vote with our dollar.

Timothy Carney wrote:
Perhaps the only way to persuade big companies to reject cronyism is for spirited free-marketeers to somehow make up the majority of their shareholders -- or their customers. If the latter sounds impossibly quixotic, consider the case of Allison and BB&T.

In 2005, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled, in Kelo v. New London, that local governments could use the power of eminent domain to take land from owners and transfer it to private companies. The ruling infuriated believers in property rights and critics of cronyism. Amid the public outcry, Allison announced that his bank, BB&T, would not finance commercial real estate deals that involved eminent domain takings.

This would seem to violate Milton Friedman's rules for corporations. "I wonder whether this stance would be found compatible with management's fiduciary duties to shareholders," wrote McGill political theory professor Jacob T. Levy at the time, "if it meant that potentially profitable loans were being ruled out because their objects, while legal, were 'just plain wrong.' "

Allison says he didn't know how the decision would affect the bank's bottom line. "The pleasant surprise is, we had thousands of individuals move their checking accounts to BB&T.... They said, look, I want to do business with a bank that acts on principle."

By sacrificing for principle, Allison ironically made a profit, because his customers were willing to take principled stands with their money, as well. Was it a profit-maximizing move for those individual foes of corporate welfare, devotees of property rights, or straight-up libertarians to switch to BB&T? More likely, this was about voting with their dollars -- supporting businesses that share your values.


Corporate governance reform will be necessary before shareholders can wield the serious political power that has been captured by Big Boardroom; CEOs sit on the boards of allied companies and vote each other extremely high compensation packages. In the meantime, voting with your dollar can provide some psychic relief, even if it will not turn this corrupt machine over entirely.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
rollo



Joined: 10 May 2006
Location: China

PostPosted: Sat May 04, 2013 6:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

chiquita are the best. But delmonte are good also. try some of those.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.thenewamerican.com/world-news/north-america/item/17396-u-s-government-and-top-mexican-drug-cartel-exposed-as-partners

Quote:
For over a decade, under multiple administrations, the U.S. government had a secret agreement with the ruthless Mexican Sinaloa drug cartel that allowed it to operate with impunity, an in-depth investigation by a leading Mexican newspaper confirmed this week. In exchange for information and assistance in quashing competing criminal syndicates, the Bush and Obama administrations let the Sinaloa cartel import tons of drugs into the United States while wiping out Sinaloa competitors and ensuring that its leaders would not be prosecuted for their long list of major crimes. Other revelations also point strongly to massive but clandestine U.S. government involvement in drug trafficking.


The full article is too long to post but worth a read.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
guavashake



Joined: 09 Nov 2013

PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

speaking of bananas...

http://www.memecenter.com/fun/1061945/obama---banana

Perhaps you have seen the photo of the Obamas mesmerized by a banana.

This insulting photo is made in layers, its a fake.

Oh, wait..... the certification of birth issued by the white house is made in layers.....

Obama is the one who is making a monkey out of people.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dU_wQw1ugzw

Maj. Gen. Paul Vallely: Obama's Forged Birth Certificate & Multiple Social Security Numbers
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://wallstreetonparade.com/2014/03/fed-nominee-stanley-fischer-has-a-citigroup-problem/

Citi, Rubin, Fischer, Grubman, Weill and trillions of losses&bailouts due to fraud etc. Oh, and the Fed.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2R0oECCuN6I
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
young_clinton



Joined: 09 Sep 2009

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 2:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Titus wrote:
http://www.thenewamerican.com/world-news/north-america/item/17396-u-s-government-and-top-mexican-drug-cartel-exposed-as-partners

Quote:
For over a decade, under multiple administrations, the U.S. government had a secret agreement with the ruthless Mexican Sinaloa drug cartel that allowed it to operate with impunity, an in-depth investigation by a leading Mexican newspaper confirmed this week. In exchange for information and assistance in quashing competing criminal syndicates, the Bush and Obama administrations let the Sinaloa cartel import tons of drugs into the United States while wiping out Sinaloa competitors and ensuring that its leaders would not be prosecuted for their long list of major crimes. Other revelations also point strongly to massive but clandestine U.S. government involvement in drug trafficking.


The full article is too long to post but worth a read.


Here we have it folks, proof! Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
young_clinton



Joined: 09 Sep 2009

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 3:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

guavashake wrote:
layers.....

Obama is the one who is making a monkey out of people.





So who would you have for president? Obama won in a landslide election.

People lost interest in the Obama birth certificate issue a long time ago, except for a few of the lunatic fringe. Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Current Events Forum All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... , 12, 13, 14  Next
Page 13 of 14

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2013 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International