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Australian republicanism a thing of the past?
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robbie_davies



Joined: 16 Jun 2013

PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2014 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bucheon bum wrote:
robbie_davies wrote:
I'm With You wrote:

You are wrong.


No I am not.

Quote:
Australia is American, by default.


You said Melbourne was an 'American' city, therefore, your opinion on anything about Australia is wrong by default.

Quote:
They are constitutionally and culturally America's right hand man.


Their constitution was written in 1901 and culturally, nothing like America.

Quote:
Again, I've spent a lot of time in Australia


I'll bet money you are lying.

Quote:
and was quite intrigued by this. Yet your typical Australian doesn't seem to even realize this.


They don't realise this because it is not true.


Have you ever lived in Australia? And it is clear you have spent little to no time in the States. He's not totally off the mark. Australia has a lot in common with the USA. Its politics are more similar to the USA than Canada's. Tony Abbot would do well as a politician in a big chunk of the USA. I doubt he'd be very successful in Canada, except maybe in Alberta. Ditto with former PM John Howard.


I lived in Australia for a fair chunk of my childhood, is that good enough for you?

He is way off the mark and we go back to politics again, you can say the UK is aligned with the US politically but the people and moreso the culture on the ground is nothing like the states.

A lot less religion, also Australians are relentless 'piss takers' you will never hear them say anything like 'oh, you are offending me' and are a lot more direct than Americans. Sport? their sporting interests are aligned towards British sports (cricket and rugby league in NSW) the cuisine is definitely more British and there are just more Brits in general with millions of Australians having more than one British grandparent.

The main one is religion though, you never hear Australians say 'God bless' or 'You are in our prayers' or the other religious mumbo jumbo Americans like to spurt out.

Oh, and Australians like to swear more with Aussie men loving to use the 'c' word that Americans take shock to.
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cabeza



Joined: 29 Sep 2012

PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2014 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Australians as the Americans of the South Pacific isn't a new idea.
As a New Zealander, Australians always seem to have a lot more self-confidence and optimism. Somewhat American qualities.

Of course this is simplistic and generalized in the extreme, but it has some truth to it.
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Scorpion



Joined: 15 Apr 2012

PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2014 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the republican thing was a passing fade. Last month Quebec tossed out its separatist government because they were going to call another referendum on independence from Canada. Most Quebeckers aren't interested. The republican terror campaign in Northern Ireland failed and now Martin McGuinness is dining with the Queen at Windsor Castle. Australians seem to have lost interest in a republic, and there are Irish voices calling for the Republic to rejoin the Commonwealth. The British Labour Party is no longer the radical 'ditch the monarchy' party it once was. Only Scotland is stirring things up now. But the referendum in September will, in all likelyhood, return an overwhelming "No" vote. It isn't going anywhere.

People are starting to realize that if something ain't broke, don't fix it. Scotland will get past this republican moment, just as it appears Australia has done, and will continue its membership as an integral part of the UK.
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jvalmer



Joined: 06 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2014 3:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Scorpion wrote:
I think the republican thing was a passing fade.

It's not a passing fade. It's just something that can be addressed way way later. In Canada it's difficult to change constitutionally since you need all premiers to agree to consider it, then put it to a referendum where you need a 2/3 yes-vote in every single province, then 2/3 of the senate and House of Commons. With all those old people still alive it would be difficult to get rid the queen from the coins. A massive waste of money, although I would love to see the monarch gone from Canada.

Also, there are tons of way more important things to deal with right now.
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aq8knyus



Joined: 28 Jul 2010
Location: London

PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 6:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jvalmer wrote:
Scorpion wrote:
I think the republican thing was a passing fade.

It's not a passing fade. It's just something that can be addressed way way later. In Canada it's difficult to change constitutionally since you need all premiers to agree to consider it, then put it to a referendum where you need a 2/3 yes-vote in every single province, then 2/3 of the senate and House of Commons. With all those old people still alive it would be difficult to get rid the queen from the coins. A massive waste of money, although I would love to see the monarch gone from Canada.

Also, there are tons of way more important things to deal with right now.


I see a similar argument in Australia. Every time I watch Q & A they say that one day it will change, but right now there are bigger issues.

The thing is there will always be bigger issues, there will never be a time when there aren't major domestic problems pushing dry and difficult constitutional changes further down the agenda.

In a way that attitude is the reason why monarchy endures, no one gets excited about the issue because they are too busy talking about more important things.

At this rate the monarchy will continue well into the next century.
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