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PeterDragon



Joined: 15 Feb 2007

PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 7:38 am    Post subject: sfasffd Reply with quote

adfs

Last edited by PeterDragon on Sun Aug 14, 2016 11:40 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Who's Your Daddy?



Joined: 30 May 2010
Location: Victoria, Canada.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 3:07 pm    Post subject: Re: Getting a divorce in Korea while not living in Korea? Reply with quote

PeterDragon wrote:
her family [have] been taking my side on all this...


That's interesting. Maybe they know she's nuts.

I'll give you these two for reference:

http://askkorealaw.com/2011/03/08/divorce/#more-1178

http://www.thekoreanlawblog.com/2013/05/getting-marital-separation-agreegment.html

==
Can you get a hold of your son's passports, and birth certificates, and family registry documents (although she can make more). That will make it harder to leave the country with your son.

I think after you divorce stateside you can get a watch put on so she'd have trouble leaving the country with your son. [But I'm just guessing this part!]

If your child is attending a kindergarten advise them of the situation; so she can't pick him up.

Keep in mind for the distant future; unless your son renounces his Korean citizenship by 16, he will be expected to do his military service. (After 16 you can't renounce until you've done the service.)
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Old Painless



Joined: 01 Jan 2014

PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe you should talk to an attorney that actually practices law in Korea. That would be a good start.
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Weigookin74



Joined: 26 Oct 2009

PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You should get divorced in America if you can. The judges over here will show you as a foriegner less favor.
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Weigookin74



Joined: 26 Oct 2009

PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 6:11 pm    Post subject: Re: Getting a divorce in Korea while not living in Korea? Reply with quote

Who's Your Daddy? wrote:
PeterDragon wrote:
her family [have] been taking my side on all this...


That's interesting. Maybe they know she's nuts.

I'll give you these two for reference:

http://askkorealaw.com/2011/03/08/divorce/#more-1178

http://www.thekoreanlawblog.com/2013/05/getting-marital-separation-agreegment.html

==
Can you get a hold of your son's passports, and birth certificates, and family registry documents (although she can make more). That will make it harder to leave the country with your son.

I think after you divorce stateside you can get a watch put on so she'd have trouble leaving the country with your son. [But I'm just guessing this part!]

If your child is attending a kindergarten advise them of the situation; so she can't pick him up.

Keep in mind for the distant future; unless your son renounces his Korean citizenship by 16, he will be expected to do his military service. (After 16 you can't renounce until you've done the service.)


The family might be lying to get you over here and then say the opposite in court. DO NOT GET DIVORCED IN KOREA.

Had a friend get divorced here and he just got the run around. Rule of law? Ha ha ha ha. Do it in America. I'll say it again: DO IT IN AMERICA.
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Who's Your Daddy?



Joined: 30 May 2010
Location: Victoria, Canada.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Korea doesn't have alimony. That might be a reason to do it in Korea. I also believe (but don't have stats) that men often get custody of children.

I understand some of you saying Korea might not be the best for a foreigner to get a fare shake, I'd worry in the US (or Western countries) men don't get a fare deal either.

But I wouldn't come to Korea.

If you live in a state with a large Korean population you might find a Korean-American lawyer.
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Sesame



Joined: 16 Mar 2014

PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

your wife sounds certifiably NUTS.
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Yaya



Joined: 25 Feb 2003
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank goodness I didn't marry a Korean woman (and I'm a Kor-Am, by the way).
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PeterDragon



Joined: 15 Feb 2007

PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2014 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

asd

Last edited by PeterDragon on Sun Aug 14, 2016 9:03 pm; edited 1 time in total
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beentheredonethat777



Joined: 27 Jul 2013
Location: AsiaHaven

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 3:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
[quote="Who's Your Daddy?"]Korea doesn't have alimony. That might be a reason to do it in Korea. I also believe (but don't have stats) that men often get custody of children
.

^^.This. I've had a few friends and associates who have experienced a divorce in Korea. But in EVERY case the children were automatically given to the men. They told me, its the Korean way. Of course, in America, its usually the other way around.
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Old Painless



Joined: 01 Jan 2014

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yaya wrote:
Thank goodness I didn't marry a Korean woman (and I'm a Kor-Am, by the way).



It'a not that bad for everyone. I myself have only suffered two fractures and a concussion and I've been married for 19 years.
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Weigookin74



Joined: 26 Oct 2009

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 5:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Who's Your Daddy? wrote:
Korea doesn't have alimony. That might be a reason to do it in Korea. I also believe (but don't have stats) that men often get custody of children.

I understand some of you saying Korea might not be the best for a foreigner to get a fare shake, I'd worry in the US (or Western countries) men don't get a fare deal either.

But I wouldn't come to Korea.

If you live in a state with a large Korean population you might find a Korean-American lawyer.


No, but women will often get the kids. They'll keep the kids and violate court orders to let you see them. Keeping the kids is a civil liability issue and not a matter of criminal law here. They'll keep the kids and the legal system won't help you even if you have joint custody and visitiation rights. If the woman is nuts and screams the loudest as well as acts emtoional in court, she gets her own way. You're screwed.


She'll use to the kids to blackmail you and demand lots of money. The court will order a split of assets in some way here.

In the US, there is alimony. But, if you have rights with the kids and the ex wife doesn't honor them, it's a criminal penalty. There's more incentive to comply.
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Who's Your Daddy?



Joined: 30 May 2010
Location: Victoria, Canada.

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 5:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

^^My understanding is:

Korean courts usually give the kids to the parent that makes money to provide for the kids (i.e. Dad). There is no alimony. And Korean women don't expect to receive half of the family assets. The woman will be left with little, and no monthly alimony.

Western courts will almost automatically give children to the mother and order the father to pay child support. A father will be left with at the most 50% of his assets and will be assessed such high monthly payments he'll live in poverty.

Korea is a man's world.

If I were the OP I'd try to get divorced in Korea (though a Korean lawyer, not in person), then get the Korean divorce recognized in the U.S. The worst case judgment I could see in Korea would probably be a normal judgment in the U.S.
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Lucas



Joined: 11 Sep 2012

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
And Korean women don't expect to receive half of the family assets.


What if there was no male heir (brother).
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