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The Korean Language Question And Answer Thread
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jitter



Joined: 16 Mar 2007

PostPosted: Sat Aug 31, 2013 12:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello, sorry for a bit of spam but I thought posters in this thread might also like to support http://area51.stackexchange.com/proposals/56835/korean-language-usage-klu

If you are already a user of other stack exchange sites, you will know that it's a format that works really well.
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ttompatz



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Location: Kwangju, South Korea

PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I need some help from someone whose Korean is better than mine.
(I'm working on a syntax project and need some help with relative clauses).

How would you say/write (in hangul) the equivalent of:

"She is wrapping the package that is for Christmas."

Many thanks.
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Fox



Joined: 04 Mar 2009

PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

그녀는 크리스마스를 위한 선물을 포장하고 있다.

Something needs to be emphasized: Korean doesn't use relative clauses in the same way as English, they'll just modify the noun instead.

Edit: also, without thinking about it, I wrote wrapping a present instead of wrapping a package. If you really want package specifically, you can use 소포 instead of 선물.
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ttompatz



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Location: Kwangju, South Korea

PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 7:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fox wrote:
그녀는 크리스마스를 위한 선물을 포장하고 있다.

Something needs to be emphasized: Korean doesn't use relative clauses in the same way as English, they'll just modify the noun instead.

Edit: also, without thinking about it, I wrote wrapping a present instead of wrapping a package. If you really want package specifically, you can use 소포 instead of 선물.


I know they don't use relative clauses... but I wanted to make sure about the grammar form for the syntax presentation.

Thanks

.
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T-J



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Location: Seoul EunpyungGu Yonshinnae

PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2013 4:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fox wrote:
그녀는 크리스마스를 위한 선물을 포장하고 있다.

Something needs to be emphasized: Korean doesn't use relative clauses in the same way as English, they'll just modify the noun instead.

Edit: also, without thinking about it, I wrote wrapping a present instead of wrapping a package. If you really want package specifically, you can use 소포 instead of 선물.


I'm leaning toward disagreeing with this statement as most relative clauses in English modify a noun as well. The difference as a drunkenly type is that in Korean the clause comes before and is juxtaposed with the noun which makes it easier to identify than its English equivalent.
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Fox



Joined: 04 Mar 2009

PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2013 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

T-J wrote:
Fox wrote:
그녀는 크리스마스를 위한 선물을 포장하고 있다.

Something needs to be emphasized: Korean doesn't use relative clauses in the same way as English, they'll just modify the noun instead.

Edit: also, without thinking about it, I wrote wrapping a present instead of wrapping a package. If you really want package specifically, you can use 소포 instead of 선물.


I'm leaning toward disagreeing with this statement as most relative clauses in English modify a noun as well. The difference as a drunkenly type is that in Korean the clause comes before and is juxtaposed with the noun which makes it easier to identify than its English equivalent.


Relative statements do not modify the original noun, they use a relative pronoun. "My mother, who I like, is beautiful." "I like" doesn't (and can't) modify "my mother," it modifies "who," and it's only the fact that "who" relatively refers to "my mother" which produces a link. It's the lack of need of a relative pronoun (or even the ability to use one) which creates a difference. It's not simply a different word order, it's mechanically different.
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Drew345



Joined: 24 May 2005

PostPosted: Sun Nov 24, 2013 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I need to answer this question to join a cafe (probably a bot-check)

한국어 교육의 대상은 누구인가?

I'm thinking their asking me for: 세종대왕
but I get "wrong answer" for that .
Any idea how to answer above question (in 10 characters or less.)
Thanks,
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tatertot



Joined: 21 Oct 2008

PostPosted: Sun Dec 01, 2013 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Drew345 wrote:
I need to answer this question to join a cafe (probably a bot-check)

한국어 교육의 대상은 누구인가?

I'm thinking their asking me for: 세종대왕
but I get "wrong answer" for that .
Any idea how to answer above question (in 10 characters or less.)
Thanks,

I asked my daughters and they said you should try 학생 and 아이 or 아이들. Good luck!
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World Traveler



Joined: 29 May 2009

PostPosted: Fri Jan 03, 2014 11:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

흔하다 means commonplace.

흔치 않다 means rare.

흔치 않다 is a shortened form of 흔하지 않다, but most people don't say 흔하지 않다.

Are there other words which shorten ~하지 않다 to ~치 않다? I would think so, but my Korean tutor said 흔치 않다 is the only one. True?
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Fox



Joined: 04 Mar 2009

PostPosted: Fri Jan 03, 2014 11:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

World Traveler wrote:
흔하다 means commonplace.

흔치 않다 means rare.

흔치 않다 is a shortened form of 흔하지 않다, but most people don't say 흔하지 않다.

Are there other words which shorten ~하지 않다 to ~치 않다? I would think so, but my Korean tutor said 흔치 않다 is the only one. True?


A use I've seen which immediately springs to mind 여의치 않다: to not turn out as one expects. Here's the thing, though: this is a standard contraction, isn't it? I'm pretty sure you can use it anytime you have ~하지 않다. 중요하지 않다 --> 중요치 않다, etc.
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wanderkind



Joined: 01 Jan 2012
Location: Japan

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 11:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

World Traveler wrote:
흔하다 means commonplace.

흔치 않다 means rare.

흔치 않다 is a shortened form of 흔하지 않다, but most people don't say 흔하지 않다.

Are there other words which shorten ~하지 않다 to ~치 않다? I would think so, but my Korean tutor said 흔치 않다 is the only one. True?


I think the -잖아요 ending started as -지 않아요 but the meaning isn't quite the same any more. The way I understand it it went from being ", is it not?" to spanning a wider range of meanings like ", don't you know/see?" or even "....obviously." etc. indicating an expectation that the listener knows something is a certain way.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
For my own question:
Can anyone succinctly explain the core and broader concept/usage of 되다?

Or, (as probably is the case) if that is too much hassle, could you direct me to a good explanation of it?

I've had only a vague understanding of it since it was never really explained in the texts I've been using, but as I watched more Korean TV I hear it CONSTANTLY yet the meaning often escapes me / if there's subtitles they usually aren't what I expect it to mean (like, "Forget it." or "It's over."...and about a dozen other things).
아직 의미를 알아잡을 수 없으니까 나한테 도와를 주세요!

A Korean friend said these days Koreans get kind of sloppy and use it more often than they should which was probably confusing to foreigners, ...but that didn't really help me at all.
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javis



Joined: 28 Feb 2013

PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2014 5:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

wanderkind wrote:

For my own question:
Can anyone succinctly explain the core and broader concept/usage of 되다?

Or, (as probably is the case) if that is too much hassle, could you direct me to a good explanation of it?

I've had only a vague understanding of it since it was never really explained in the texts I've been using, but as I watched more Korean TV I hear it CONSTANTLY yet the meaning often escapes me / if there's subtitles they usually aren't what I expect it to mean (like, "Forget it." or "It's over."...and about a dozen other things).
아직 의미를 알아잡을 수 없으니까 나한테 도와를 주세요!

A Korean friend said these days Koreans get kind of sloppy and use it more often than they should which was probably confusing to foreigners, ...but that didn't really help me at all.


This is like asking what the word "to be" means. The meaning is mostly dependant on what words it is combined with. That said, I'll summarize the most commonly used definitions of the word itself for you.

되다, verb
1. to take on a new identity or status
2. to change into something else
3. to arrive at a certain time, period or state

As for what it means when it is used in combination with other words, you'll have to be more specific.
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jazzmaster



Joined: 30 Sep 2013

PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't get my head around when to use 는/은 or 가/이. Can someone simplify this for me?
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wanderkind



Joined: 01 Jan 2012
Location: Japan

PostPosted: Sun Jul 06, 2014 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jazzmaster wrote:
I can't get my head around when to use 는/은 or 가/이. Can someone simplify this for me?

So, I'll qualify this by saying I still don't understand it completely myself, but since no one else has got back to you, I'm gonna synthesize the explanation in my grammar text briefly and include some of its examples. Hopefully it will help or at least prompt someone else to correct me.

-는/은 is a post-positional particle (조사) used to indicate the sentence topic, or convey emphasis/contrast. In short, you stick it on a word to highlight it.
sentence topic:
이 연필 참 좋아요.

아침에 일찍 일어납니다.


contrast:
기 가게에서 사과 파는데 포동 없어요.


Most commonly it overwrites the subject marker 이/가 but it might also overwrite the object marker 를/을 (I'm not very familiar with this employment)
애기가 밥은 잘 먹습니다.

And then to really add colour to the whole affair, it can be tacked on to other particles, adverbs, connective/verb endings and show up as 은/ㄴ

제가 아침 바빠요.

이 문장 조금 이해합니다.

돈이 있으면 사겠어요.
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jitter



Joined: 16 Mar 2007

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2014 11:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jazzmaster wrote:
I can't get my head around when to use 는/은 or 가/이. Can someone simplify this for me?

가/이 - gets affixed to the noun in the sentence to show what is the actor or the subject of the verb in the sentence. The verb in question does not have to be an action verb - descriptive verbs can also have a subject.

는/은 - shows the thing you are talking about.

Here's a single sentence that uses both:

철수는 머리가 좋습니다

철수는 - "OK, we are talking about Cholsu"
머리가 - his head is doing something
좋습니다 - being good

or, more simply, "Cholsu is smart".

There are other usages of both, but basically, they mean distinct things. The cause of confusion is probably the fact that the thing you are talking about is often also the subject of the verb! In this case, 는 will 'win' over 가.

In informal sentences you often don't need to use either! Try leaving them off totally, and then if people get confused, you will start seeing the need to use one or the other.
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