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Salaries stagnant for the last 20 years
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goat



Joined: 23 Feb 2010

PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2017 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
Higher inflation rates are most likely coming. The Boss will have to cut corners. Salary increases for foreigners will be the last thing on the agenda. The supply of foreign teachers will be strong. 1,900,000 is around the corner.


I've already seen hagwons advertise for 1.8. If it becomes the norm, well, good luck to the newbies.

I can't see public school increases for many years. Luckily they still cough up the bonus, pension and 2 mill for flights. Not the best deal; not the worst, either.


1.8 isn't bad for 20-30 hours of work each week with all the benefits, perks, and extras thrown in. That's 4X minimum wage.


1.8 ain't bad if you're straight out of uni and want to blog about your show box apartment, a typical day at work and things you love and hate about Korea. It's also good for the Hongdae and drinking soju outside of CU on plastic chairs as a night out set.

I was on 2.3 in 2006 and 3.6 with after school money in 2007.

1.8 is not worth going to Korea for IMHO in 2017.


Some school owners have seen their income drop since 2006 and 2007. Some have went out of business. The market can only afford to pay so much.
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World Traveler



Joined: 29 May 2009

PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2017 8:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

goat wrote:
But a first year hagwon worker will make as much as a first year bus driver once all the extra goodies are thrown in for the hagwon newbie. Too, the hagwon newbie will work about half as many hours as the bus driver.
But that's not true. Not any more. Go to the most recent job ad. It's this: http://www.eslcafe.com/jobs/korea/index.cgi?read=72404 Within the link are 11 jobs. ALL are for 40 hours a week or more. That's the norm for hagwons jobs now.
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edwardcatflap



Joined: 22 Mar 2009

PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2017 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

World Traveler wrote:
goat wrote:
But a first year hagwon worker will make as much as a first year bus driver once all the extra goodies are thrown in for the hagwon newbie. Too, the hagwon newbie will work about half as many hours as the bus driver.
But that's not true. Not any more. Go to the most recent job ad. It's this: http://www.eslcafe.com/jobs/korea/index.cgi?read=72404 Within the link are 11 jobs. ALL are for 40 hours a week or more. That's the norm for hagwons jobs now.


This is true, if I was teaching 30 contact hours of kids a week, I'd be putting in a lot more hours than a bus driver. Or my lessons would be total mayhem.
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goat



Joined: 23 Feb 2010

PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2017 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

World Traveler wrote:
goat wrote:
But a first year hagwon worker will make as much as a first year bus driver once all the extra goodies are thrown in for the hagwon newbie. Too, the hagwon newbie will work about half as many hours as the bus driver.
But that's not true. Not any more. Go to the most recent job ad. It's this: http://www.eslcafe.com/jobs/korea/index.cgi?read=72404 Within the link are 11 jobs. ALL are for 40 hours a week or more. That's the norm for hagwons jobs now.


For the sake of argument, I will agree with you. Perhaps the 24 (50 minute) classes per week isn't the norm now.

Perhaps schools were overpaying teachers 10 years ago! A teacher is worth what the market is willing to pay.
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goat



Joined: 23 Feb 2010

PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 2017 1:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

World Traveler wrote:
Korean minimum wage is 7,530 an hour. Times four is 30,120.

Assuming a 40 hour work week (which is required at public schools, and increasingly at hagwons) 1.8 would be 10,344 an hour.

So, it's more than a part time high school student worker...

...but less than a bus driver...
Quote:
“Drivers who have worked for four to seven years earn an average of 40 million won per year, a similar level to the annual salary of subway engine drivers with five years experience,” a Seoul city official said.

A better comparison might be the median yearly income for an American college grad- $60,343. That's five thousand dollars a month.

When you look at it that way is 1.8 to 2.1 a month at a hagwon a good deal?


Most likely the people coming here aren't earning the average American median yearly income of $60,343. They were probably earning $17,000.
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JohnML



Joined: 05 Jul 2015

PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2017 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

goat wrote:
World Traveler wrote:
Korean minimum wage is 7,530 an hour. Times four is 30,120.

Assuming a 40 hour work week (which is required at public schools, and increasingly at hagwons) 1.8 would be 10,344 an hour.

So, it's more than a part time high school student worker...

...but less than a bus driver...
Quote:
“Drivers who have worked for four to seven years earn an average of 40 million won per year, a similar level to the annual salary of subway engine drivers with five years experience,” a Seoul city official said.

A better comparison might be the median yearly income for an American college grad- $60,343. That's five thousand dollars a month.

When you look at it that way is 1.8 to 2.1 a month at a hagwon a good deal?


Most likely the people coming here aren't earning the average American median yearly income of $60,343. They were probably earning $17,000.


I think you'd be surprised, I know a lot of people who were in office jobs earning that or above it and bored with their life so came here taking huge salary cut. A lot of people do it for just the life/adventure/women etc... Considering a degree is also required, that automatically means we are not dealing with the average American - we are dealing with an above average demographic. No matter what way you spin it, the outlook is bleak.

People will still continue to come though even despite knowing this, there are even those who do it for free.
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weigook744



Joined: 12 Sep 2017
Location: Hangook

PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2017 11:06 am    Post subject: Re: Inflation coming up, Min. Wage Increase Reply with quote

gerald.in.korea wrote:
As of 2018 the minimum wage in Korea is going up to around 15,000,000 KRW. While most of the Foreign Teachers are already being paid more than that and usually get additional housing (another 2-500 K KRW) and Airfare (one way at least) the issue for the Teaching Companies will be that all the support staff and Korean Teachers wages will increase. It was not uncommon for a Qualified Korean who taught English (crystal clear English) and Kyopo's to get 2/3 to 1/2 of a Foreign Teachers wage.

Now the out going costs for the supporting staff (and some of the Korean Teachers and Korean Teaching Assistants) will increase, and in some cases up by 50% to 100% (literately).

The Korean Economy traditionally buried it's inflation in the land prices, where as the USA Economy buried it in the Stock Market, the jump in minimum wage will create up wards inflationary pressure and the effects will be felt starting January 2018.

The good news is that the cost difference between a Foreign Teacher and a Korean Teacher will be less, the bad news is that rental housing will go up, food will go up etc.


Wow! If this is true, it will be a huge drop in living standards for foreign English teachers. It will be time to get out by next decade.
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weigook744



Joined: 12 Sep 2017
Location: Hangook

PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2017 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
Higher inflation rates are most likely coming. The Boss will have to cut corners. Salary increases for foreigners will be the last thing on the agenda. The supply of foreign teachers will be strong. 1,900,000 is around the corner.


I've already seen hagwons advertise for 1.8. If it becomes the norm, well, good luck to the newbies.

I can't see public school increases for many years. Luckily they still cough up the bonus, pension and 2 mill for flights. Not the best deal; not the worst, either.


1.8 isn't bad for 20-30 hours of work each week with all the benefits, perks, and extras thrown in. That's 4X minimum wage.


1.8 ain't bad if you're straight out of uni and want to blog about your show box apartment, a typical day at work and things you love and hate about Korea. It's also good for the Hongdae and drinking soju outside of CU on plastic chairs as a night out set.

I was on 2.3 in 2006 and 3.6 with after school money in 2007.

1.8 is not worth going to Korea for IMHO in 2017.


1.8? Added to the living cost spike next year? How would any young person pay off their student loans and credit cards? I think personally the minimum starting teaching wage should be 2.7 or 2.8 a month, but even that would be less than wages in 2006 when inflation is factored in.
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SuperfuzzBigmuff



Joined: 12 Mar 2017

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

weigook744 wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
Higher inflation rates are most likely coming. The Boss will have to cut corners. Salary increases for foreigners will be the last thing on the agenda. The supply of foreign teachers will be strong. 1,900,000 is around the corner.


I've already seen hagwons advertise for 1.8. If it becomes the norm, well, good luck to the newbies.

I can't see public school increases for many years. Luckily they still cough up the bonus, pension and 2 mill for flights. Not the best deal; not the worst, either.


1.8 isn't bad for 20-30 hours of work each week with all the benefits, perks, and extras thrown in. That's 4X minimum wage.


1.8 ain't bad if you're straight out of uni and want to blog about your show box apartment, a typical day at work and things you love and hate about Korea. It's also good for the Hongdae and drinking soju outside of CU on plastic chairs as a night out set.

I was on 2.3 in 2006 and 3.6 with after school money in 2007.

1.8 is not worth going to Korea for IMHO in 2017.


1.8? Added to the living cost spike next year? How would any young person pay off their student loans and credit cards? I think personally the minimum starting teaching wage should be 2.7 or 2.8 a month, but even that would be less than wages in 2006 when inflation is factored in.


2.7-2.8 sounds reasonable for those with actual teaching experience in the public system.

I don't think some "teachers" here should be getting much more than 2.1 if they have no experience and an online TEFL.

2.1 seems fair for newbie hagwoners and newbies should NOT be teaching in public schools. That should be for those with actual teaching experience and training, but, saying that, my experience and training doesn't count for much in the joke that is a Korean English public school class.

Take out the bonuses, and this is a very sad caper indeed; especially when 2.7 is the max for most jobs. 1.8? Might as well be stacking shelves in a supermarket back home.
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goat



Joined: 23 Feb 2010

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
weigook744 wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
Higher inflation rates are most likely coming. The Boss will have to cut corners. Salary increases for foreigners will be the last thing on the agenda. The supply of foreign teachers will be strong. 1,900,000 is around the corner.


I've already seen hagwons advertise for 1.8. If it becomes the norm, well, good luck to the newbies.

I can't see public school increases for many years. Luckily they still cough up the bonus, pension and 2 mill for flights. Not the best deal; not the worst, either.


1.8 isn't bad for 20-30 hours of work each week with all the benefits, perks, and extras thrown in. That's 4X minimum wage.


1.8 ain't bad if you're straight out of uni and want to blog about your show box apartment, a typical day at work and things you love and hate about Korea. It's also good for the Hongdae and drinking soju outside of CU on plastic chairs as a night out set.

I was on 2.3 in 2006 and 3.6 with after school money in 2007.

1.8 is not worth going to Korea for IMHO in 2017.


1.8? Added to the living cost spike next year? How would any young person pay off their student loans and credit cards? I think personally the minimum starting teaching wage should be 2.7 or 2.8 a month, but even that would be less than wages in 2006 when inflation is factored in.


2.7-2.8 sounds reasonable for those with actual teaching experience in the public system.

I don't think some "teachers" here should be getting much more than 2.1 if they have no experience and an online TEFL.

2.1 seems fair for newbie hagwoners and newbies should NOT be teaching in public schools. That should be for those with actual teaching experience and training, but, saying that, my experience and training doesn't count for much in the joke that is a Korean English public school class.

Take out the bonuses, and this is a very sad caper indeed; especially when 2.7 is the max for most jobs. 1.8? Might as well be stacking shelves in a supermarket back home.


I disagree. The 2.1 or 1.8 should be going to the public school "teachers."

The 2.7 should be going to the hagwoners who have proved themselves worthy of 2.7 in the private market. 2.7 isn't that difficult in the private market if one has some experience and the skills.
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SuperfuzzBigmuff



Joined: 12 Mar 2017

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 10:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

goat wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
weigook744 wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
Higher inflation rates are most likely coming. The Boss will have to cut corners. Salary increases for foreigners will be the last thing on the agenda. The supply of foreign teachers will be strong. 1,900,000 is around the corner.


I've already seen hagwons advertise for 1.8. If it becomes the norm, well, good luck to the newbies.

I can't see public school increases for many years. Luckily they still cough up the bonus, pension and 2 mill for flights. Not the best deal; not the worst, either.


1.8 isn't bad for 20-30 hours of work each week with all the benefits, perks, and extras thrown in. That's 4X minimum wage.


1.8 ain't bad if you're straight out of uni and want to blog about your show box apartment, a typical day at work and things you love and hate about Korea. It's also good for the Hongdae and drinking soju outside of CU on plastic chairs as a night out set.

I was on 2.3 in 2006 and 3.6 with after school money in 2007.

1.8 is not worth going to Korea for IMHO in 2017.


1.8? Added to the living cost spike next year? How would any young person pay off their student loans and credit cards? I think personally the minimum starting teaching wage should be 2.7 or 2.8 a month, but even that would be less than wages in 2006 when inflation is factored in.


2.7-2.8 sounds reasonable for those with actual teaching experience in the public system.

I don't think some "teachers" here should be getting much more than 2.1 if they have no experience and an online TEFL.

2.1 seems fair for newbie hagwoners and newbies should NOT be teaching in public schools. That should be for those with actual teaching experience and training, but, saying that, my experience and training doesn't count for much in the joke that is a Korean English public school class.

Take out the bonuses, and this is a very sad caper indeed; especially when 2.7 is the max for most jobs. 1.8? Might as well be stacking shelves in a supermarket back home.


I disagree. The 2.1 or 1.8 should be going to the public school "teachers."

The 2.7 should be going to the hagwoners who have proved themselves worthy of 2.7 in the private market. 2.7 isn't that difficult in the private market if one has some experience and the skills.


Given the fact that public school teachers are on a pretty good deal with bonus and pension, nice vacation time, and that they are working in an actual Korean government public school with teachers with education degrees, I think experience should be mandatory and 2.7 the minimum.

Most hagwons are a nasty and cynical money-making scheme. "No experience necessary". (Granted, most PS jobs don't require experience which is utterly pathetic).

1.8 is fair for those hagwoners with zero experience. For those teaching kids with content like "what's she doing?", I think 2.1 max; higher for the fraction teaching high-level adults in the private system.
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goat



Joined: 23 Feb 2010

PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 3:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
weigook744 wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
Higher inflation rates are most likely coming. The Boss will have to cut corners. Salary increases for foreigners will be the last thing on the agenda. The supply of foreign teachers will be strong. 1,900,000 is around the corner.


I've already seen hagwons advertise for 1.8. If it becomes the norm, well, good luck to the newbies.

I can't see public school increases for many years. Luckily they still cough up the bonus, pension and 2 mill for flights. Not the best deal; not the worst, either.


1.8 isn't bad for 20-30 hours of work each week with all the benefits, perks, and extras thrown in. That's 4X minimum wage.


1.8 ain't bad if you're straight out of uni and want to blog about your show box apartment, a typical day at work and things you love and hate about Korea. It's also good for the Hongdae and drinking soju outside of CU on plastic chairs as a night out set.

I was on 2.3 in 2006 and 3.6 with after school money in 2007.

1.8 is not worth going to Korea for IMHO in 2017.


1.8? Added to the living cost spike next year? How would any young person pay off their student loans and credit cards? I think personally the minimum starting teaching wage should be 2.7 or 2.8 a month, but even that would be less than wages in 2006 when inflation is factored in.


2.7-2.8 sounds reasonable for those with actual teaching experience in the public system.

I don't think some "teachers" here should be getting much more than 2.1 if they have no experience and an online TEFL.

2.1 seems fair for newbie hagwoners and newbies should NOT be teaching in public schools. That should be for those with actual teaching experience and training, but, saying that, my experience and training doesn't count for much in the joke that is a Korean English public school class.

Take out the bonuses, and this is a very sad caper indeed; especially when 2.7 is the max for most jobs. 1.8? Might as well be stacking shelves in a supermarket back home.


I disagree. The 2.1 or 1.8 should be going to the public school "teachers."

The 2.7 should be going to the hagwoners who have proved themselves worthy of 2.7 in the private market. 2.7 isn't that difficult in the private market if one has some experience and the skills.


Given the fact that public school teachers are on a pretty good deal with bonus and pension, nice vacation time, and that they are working in an actual Korean government public school with teachers with education degrees, I think experience should be mandatory and 2.7 the minimum.

Most hagwons are a nasty and cynical money-making scheme. "No experience necessary". (Granted, most PS jobs don't require experience which is utterly pathetic).

1.8 is fair for those hagwoners with zero experience. For those teaching kids with content like "what's she doing?", I think 2.1 max; higher for the fraction teaching high-level adults in the private system.


I agree with much of your post.

What do you think are reasonable salaries for a public school teacher;

* newbie, no experience, BA Women's Studies

* 3 years experience, BA English Secondary Education

What do you think are reasonable salaries for a hogwon teacher;

* newbie, no experience, BA Women's Studies

* 3 years experience, BA English Secondary Education

* 4 years experience, MA English Secondary Education, Star Teacher, Prime Academy, In the Top, ETC
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Chia Pet



Joined: 23 Jun 2013

PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 1:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

goat wrote:
The 2.7 should be going to the hagwoners who have proved themselves worthy of 2.7 in the private market. 2.7 isn't that difficult in the private market if one has some experience and the skills.

You mean 2.7 wouldn't be that difficult for successful hagwons to pay if they chose to, but hagwons are rarely willing to pay that much for experience and "qualifications" (not that qualifications cause someone to be a good teacher). Are you actually working in this industry? Your assumptions that performance is rewarded here and that this is like a free market are pretty far off. Frankly, a typical hagwon isn't necessarily going to get more students with a highly competent teacher vs. a mediocre one, as most directors are selling their academy's system to the parents, who usually don't even monitor their kids' progress. But to actually do what's right for the students would often mean deviating from the system. Most directors (and some parents) don't appreciate this and just want someone who follows the curriculum and doesn't get complaints. Conspicuous extra effort or skills might get you favorable treatment, but rarely a serious increase in salary. (The situation is probably different for those with F visas who teach privately, and it may be different at test prep academies.) On top of this, many Korean directors will be insulted if you dare disagree with their decisions, and thus actually prefer to hire a teacher who doesn't know too much.

SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
1.8 is fair for those hagwoners with zero experience. For those teaching kids with content like "what's she doing?", I think 2.1 max; higher for the fraction teaching high-level adults in the private system.

Now this is bull and disrespectful to all the dedicated kindy and elementary teachers out there. To effectively teach lower-level children is more difficult than teaching adults and experience is more important for it. If you can do well with kids teaching adults is often a breeze. I'm not sure why you said this, but also said public school NETs should get 2.7 minimum. Your statements make me think you probably aren't very good at teaching kids on your own.
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goat



Joined: 23 Feb 2010

PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chia Pet wrote:
goat wrote:
The 2.7 should be going to the hagwoners who have proved themselves worthy of 2.7 in the private market. 2.7 isn't that difficult in the private market if one has some experience and the skills.

You mean 2.7 wouldn't be that difficult for successful hagwons to pay if they chose to, but hagwons are rarely willing to pay that much for experience and "qualifications" (not that qualifications cause someone to be a good teacher). Are you actually working in this industry? Your assumptions that performance is rewarded here and that this is like a free market are pretty far off. Frankly, a typical hagwon isn't necessarily going to get more students with a highly competent teacher vs. a mediocre one, as most directors are selling their academy's system to the parents, who usually don't even monitor their kids' progress. But to actually do what's right for the students would often mean deviating from the system. Most directors (and some parents) don't appreciate this and just want someone who follows the curriculum and doesn't get complaints. Conspicuous extra effort or skills might get you favorable treatment, but rarely a serious increase in salary. (The situation is probably different for those with F visas who teach privately, and it may be different at test prep academies.) On top of this, many Korean directors will be insulted if you dare disagree with their decisions, and thus actually prefer to hire a teacher who doesn't know too much.

SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
1.8 is fair for those hagwoners with zero experience. For those teaching kids with content like "what's she doing?", I think 2.1 max; higher for the fraction teaching high-level adults in the private system.

Now this is bull and disrespectful to all the dedicated kindy and elementary teachers out there. To effectively teach lower-level children is more difficult than teaching adults and experience is more important for it. If you can do well with kids teaching adults is often a breeze. I'm not sure why you said this, but also said public school NETs should get 2.7 minimum. Your statements make me think you probably aren't very good at teaching kids on your own.


Yes, I'm working in this industry. I teach speaking, listening, reading, and writing. I edit work and do other various things in the field of English. My salary is far more than 2.7.

Teaching kindy and elementary isn't necessarily more difficult than teaching adults. This is where qualifications in this area become handy.
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SuperfuzzBigmuff



Joined: 12 Mar 2017

PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

goat wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
weigook744 wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
SuperfuzzBigmuff wrote:
goat wrote:
Higher inflation rates are most likely coming. The Boss will have to cut corners. Salary increases for foreigners will be the last thing on the agenda. The supply of foreign teachers will be strong. 1,900,000 is around the corner.


I've already seen hagwons advertise for 1.8. If it becomes the norm, well, good luck to the newbies.

I can't see public school increases for many years. Luckily they still cough up the bonus, pension and 2 mill for flights. Not the best deal; not the worst, either.


1.8 isn't bad for 20-30 hours of work each week with all the benefits, perks, and extras thrown in. That's 4X minimum wage.


1.8 ain't bad if you're straight out of uni and want to blog about your show box apartment, a typical day at work and things you love and hate about Korea. It's also good for the Hongdae and drinking soju outside of CU on plastic chairs as a night out set.

I was on 2.3 in 2006 and 3.6 with after school money in 2007.

1.8 is not worth going to Korea for IMHO in 2017.


1.8? Added to the living cost spike next year? How would any young person pay off their student loans and credit cards? I think personally the minimum starting teaching wage should be 2.7 or 2.8 a month, but even that would be less than wages in 2006 when inflation is factored in.


2.7-2.8 sounds reasonable for those with actual teaching experience in the public system.

I don't think some "teachers" here should be getting much more than 2.1 if they have no experience and an online TEFL.

2.1 seems fair for newbie hagwoners and newbies should NOT be teaching in public schools. That should be for those with actual teaching experience and training, but, saying that, my experience and training doesn't count for much in the joke that is a Korean English public school class.

Take out the bonuses, and this is a very sad caper indeed; especially when 2.7 is the max for most jobs. 1.8? Might as well be stacking shelves in a supermarket back home.


I disagree. The 2.1 or 1.8 should be going to the public school "teachers."

The 2.7 should be going to the hagwoners who have proved themselves worthy of 2.7 in the private market. 2.7 isn't that difficult in the private market if one has some experience and the skills.


Given the fact that public school teachers are on a pretty good deal with bonus and pension, nice vacation time, and that they are working in an actual Korean government public school with teachers with education degrees, I think experience should be mandatory and 2.7 the minimum.

Most hagwons are a nasty and cynical money-making scheme. "No experience necessary". (Granted, most PS jobs don't require experience which is utterly pathetic).

1.8 is fair for those hagwoners with zero experience. For those teaching kids with content like "what's she doing?", I think 2.1 max; higher for the fraction teaching high-level adults in the private system.


I agree with much of your post.

What do you think are reasonable salaries for a public school teacher;

* newbie, no experience, BA Women's Studies

* 3 years experience, BA English Secondary Education

What do you think are reasonable salaries for a hogwon teacher;

* newbie, no experience, BA Women's Studies

* 3 years experience, BA English Secondary Education

* 4 years experience, MA English Secondary Education, Star Teacher, Prime Academy, In the Top, ETC


I can see what you're trying to do here, so I won't bother answering your post specifically. What I will say, though, is that experience trumps your degree. I think women's studies would involve more reading and essay writing than say, a bachelor of engineering, and, as a result, it would be a more useful degree to be teaching English with. I don't think the actual degree matters unless it's a Ba.TESOL. Having an actual degree in education would be good as you'd have learnt classroom management skills and teaching methods.

I will say that public school teachers should have 2+ years' experience in the age group chosen (ie.,elem/middle school, high school) as they are often seen as the person "in the know" and should have the skills to show the qualified, but often inept local teacher, who usually only knows endless testing and rote-memorization as teaching techniques, other types of teaching. Therefore, one should have a CELTA or equivalent. Even though it doesn't really help here in the public school system, I do use parts of what I learnt in that course as well as strategies I've learnt through experience.

In short, I think that public school teachers are seen to be a kind of mentor for the Korean teacher and they should therefore get more money than a hagwon teacher. If someone with experience or a bachelor's of education is working at a hagwon, that's their problem and they should aim higher.


Last edited by SuperfuzzBigmuff on Tue Oct 10, 2017 5:35 pm; edited 1 time in total
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