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Propaganda in Korean Education

 
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Raymo2



Joined: 27 May 2003

PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2003 6:25 am    Post subject: Propaganda in Korean Education Reply with quote

Check this brief clip out. It's the latest in Korean education of children.

mms://media.cast.or.kr/kndic/movie/613ani.wmv

Raymo
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jajdude



Joined: 18 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2003 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That was very unusual. What does it mean?? Question
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posco's trumpet



Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Location: Beneath the Underdog

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2003 5:19 am    Post subject: same story here Reply with quote



Last edited by posco's trumpet on Sat Dec 06, 2003 7:36 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Raymo2



Joined: 27 May 2003

PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2003 4:58 am    Post subject: Re: same story here Reply with quote

Yes, it was a horrible and terrible tragedy that those two girls lost their lives in such a manner.

But the way in which this tragedy was politicized to promote anti-Americanism is almost just as horrible and tragic.

The Korean media never ever mentioned that the General immediately personally apologized to the families twice, that U.S. officers held the first candlelight vigils for the two girls, that compensation was paid which the families accepted, the largest ever paid by U.S. military.

Thus, after that, according to Korean culture, the case is closed.

That all occured before the World Cup was over, but Koreans were too wrapped up in their illegitimate wins in the World Cup (no doubt, some linesmen were paid well during those matches against Spain and Italy), to worry about all that. While Americans were falling over backwards to apologize to and compensate the families, nothing was printed by the Korean media and not a complaint was made about the tragedy. They calculatingly waited until after the World Cup.

Now, I say it's time to stage candlelight vigils to protest the obvious criminal negligence in the case of Matthew Sellers. It's time to make such a video clip to educate the people of the U.S. about the real nature of Koreans' attitude to foreigners.

Coz if you're not Korean, you can be beat up on the subway, held by the police and drugged, and no one will take responsibility or pay compensation, and no one will be charged with a crime and it'll never be reported.

It'll just be swept under the rug until it fades away and dies, and nobody remembers.

One year from now:

"What was that American's name last year that went crazy and died while in police custody?"

Raymo
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On the other hand



Joined: 19 Apr 2003
Location: I walk along the avenue

PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2003 8:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ramo2:

Why does your brief against Korean demagogues have to veer into your own theories about the supposedly rigged World Cup game? Even if the refs were bribed to the hilt(not saying they were), who really gives a rat's a$$? Is that a major issue in your life? Aren't kids still starving in Africa? This fixation on the horrible injustices of the World Cup reminds me of Koreans who treated the speedskating incident like it was the crime of the millenium.
As for the cartoon itself: maudlin politicking aside, aesthetically it was pretty good. 7 stars outta ten.
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gatohorrible



Joined: 02 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2003 9:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The fixing of the World Cup involved serious bribes well known in Europe, allegedly.
It is importnat as it lead to the generating of a mass Korean pyschology let loose in the streetz which was quickly turned around for other purposes. It is up to the individual to decide the moral worthiness of all this- but if the Korreanz had lost when they should , versus Italia , or even before, the political whooping up would likely have been harder to stir-up .
Just my 2 roubles worth.
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Bimujang



Joined: 18 May 2003
Location: Where I shouldn't be

PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2003 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mi-son and Hyo-soon.

I was having a conversation with a Korean friend a couple of days ago about this, and when my friend mentioned these names I realized that I had not heard them before. In all the things I've read and all the discussions I've had about it over the past year, all the conversations I've had with other expat friends in bars and restaurants, not once did the names of the two girls get mentioned. We expats, the ones I hang with anyway, we always referred to the victims as "Those two girls that got killed."

Wonder what's up with that? By which I mean, what is it I was trying to accomplish by not allowing myself to give names to these children?

By the same token, I want to express a strong objection to mentioning Matt Sellers' name in this context.

Quote:
But the way in which this tragedy was politicized to promote anti-Americanism is almost just as horrible and tragic.

Two paragraphs later :
Quote:

Now, I say it's time to stage candlelight vigils to protest the obvious criminal negligence in the case of Matthew Sellers. It's time to make such a video clip to educate the people of the U.S. about the real nature of Koreans' attitude to foreigners.


If it is cynical politicization for the Korean media to have created a frenzy sufficient to determine a presidential election over this issue (and it was, make no mistake) it is exactly as much so for you to attempt to do the same in the case off this colleague of ours. Just curious, Raymo, will I see your name on a ballot somewhere in the next 6 months?

Unlike Mi-son and Hyo-soon, I met Matt Sellers on at least 2 occasions, sharing drinks in the company of friends. Therefore, he was slightly more than an image in a photograph and the topic of some discussion board conspiracy-seekers and I'm not able to avoid the fact that he was an actual human being like you and me. No, I can't do that as I did in the case of "those two Korean girls."

Raymo, I suggest you also take a look at your attitudes in these cases. Do not use the memory of an actual human being to promote a cause that seeks to divide people further who are already divided by too much. What we know about Matt indicates that he had great love and respect for Korean people and that in the time shortly before his death he was very troubled by the antiamericanism he experienced in Korea. Do you really think it serves as a fitting way to remember him, to use his death as way to continuate the animosities that distressed him so?

If you dare to answer yes to that I will have to accuse you of the same demogoguery which Koreans have been subjuected to over the past year.
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gatohorrible



Joined: 02 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2003 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bimu, as you met him , can you answert his ?

So how come Matthew wanted to leave because of anti- Americanism .
I thought he died recently, it wasn't December was it?
. IS it still that bad that someone would decide to leave Korea forever ??
Or was he the kind of person who'd be more affected by that heavy mood than other foreigners you know, in your opinion?
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On the other hand



Joined: 19 Apr 2003
Location: I walk along the avenue

PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2003 3:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gatohorrible:

Assume, for the sake of argument, that Korea's extended stay in the World Cup did, in fact, make it easier for the demagogues to rile up the mobs over the schoolgirls. That still doesn't make these "well-known-in-Europe-allegedly" bribes any more relevant. The political effect would've been the same whether the Koreans won legitimately or because of corruption. I still think that Raymo's innuendo was just a cheap ad hominem, which took his post out of the realm of political critique and into that of just another free-flowing anti-Korea rant.
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Medic



Joined: 11 Mar 2003

PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2003 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Korean teachers seem to dumb their students down when teaching them English. Most young kids are quick learners, but their teachers being inadequate in English seem to pass the same message on to their students. They had a hard time with English, so their students must have a hard time too. They can't possibly learn they say with their body language. It's too difficult.
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Raymo2



Joined: 27 May 2003

PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2003 7:45 am    Post subject: A Reply Reply with quote

[I was having a conversation with a Korean friend a couple of days ago about this, and when my friend mentioned these names I realized that I had not heard them before. In all the things I've read and all the discussions I've had about it over the past year, all the conversations I've had with other expat friends in bars and restaurants, not once did the names of the two girls get mentioned.]

I seriously doubt whether you (or your Korean friend) would remember their names if this incident had not been so highly publicized. And that's tragic as well because their names were misused as part of a propaganda campaign of hate. Those who misused their names did not care about preserving the memory of Mi-Son or Hyo-soon. The only thing they cared about was how they could calculatingly use their tragedy to advance the political purpose of anti-American, pro-North Korean sympathizers.

That's why I cited the World Cup. It's evidence that they calculatingly waited until after the games were over to begin their protests, at a time when Korean nationalism was at a peak, and then they used those mass emotions as well to carry over to the military accident involving the USFK.

It was a cold and calculating manipulation of Korean tribal emotion.

[By the same token, I want to express a strong objection to mentioning Matt Sellers' name in this context.]

Why would you object to that? When contrasting the tragedy of Matthew Sellers and the tragedy of the two girls, the hypocrisy of the Korean reactions is quite obvious.

In Matthew's case, there is more solid ground to bring about charges of criminal negligence than in the case of the military accident; yet, the Korean press has been virtually silent. The Joongang Ilbo article was a whitewash to keep the foreign community silent and it seems that they've done a pretty good job at it.

I would think that if you knew Matthew or were a friend of his you'd be even more outraged about it than someone like me who didn't even know the guy.

[If it is cynical politicization for the Korean media to have created a frenzy sufficient to determine a presidential election over this issue (and it was, make no mistake) it is exactly as much so for you to attempt to do the same in the case off this colleague of ours.]

Politicization is, in itself, neither bad nor good. In past history, politicization has often been necessary to achieve social justice. What matters is whether there was actual wrongdoing and whether or not, in the process of politicization, the truth is distorted for political ends that are often unrelated to the original cause.

Thus, if we apply this to the two situations, it is quite clear that the politicization of the deaths of Mi-son and Hyo-soon was an evil politicization because there was no actual criminal negiligence, that compensation had already been paid and accepted, and that the real cause was the cause of anti-Americanism rather than a protest over an injustice.

Matthew's case appears to be different. Granted, it hasn't been proven yet that there was criminal negligence but there certainly seems to be grounds for an investigation into that matter. And the virtual silence of the Korean press, the reluctance to ask hard questions to key people, is indicative of a cover up, in my opinion.

[Do not use the memory of an actual human being to promote a cause that seeks to divide people further who are already divided by too much.]

The only way that people are going to be unified is by the truth. Similarly, the reason that people are so divided is because they have avoided the truth and have listened to lies.


[What we know about Matt indicates that he had great love and respect for Korean people and that in the time shortly before his death he was very troubled by the antiamericanism he experienced in Korea. Do you really think it serves as a fitting way to remember him, to use his death as way to continuate the animosities that distressed him so?]

Yes, he was troubled by anti-Americanism and, as a result, he may have been murdered by it. The fitting way to remember him is to demand that the truth concerning the suspicious cirucumstances of his death be brought out in the open, that the hypocricy which seeks to hide the truth of those circumstances be shown in the light for what it is.

Raymo[/quote]
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gatohorrible



Joined: 02 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2003 8:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the whole of korea is dumbed down. Dumb it down anymore and you'd have an ESL teachers' common room.


I watch korean TV when i wanna relax. It takes the pain out of thinking.
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gatohorrible



Joined: 02 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2003 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

OTOH . yeah there was absolutley no connection betwen the euphoria of the world cup , the way KKKorea got to take part in it even, Chong's running for the election and Chong's edging out to be repalced by Comrade Roh ( now plain Mr.) . U r write.
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On the other hand



Joined: 19 Apr 2003
Location: I walk along the avenue

PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2003 8:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gato:

I did not say there was no connection between the euphoria of the world cup and subsequent political events. I merely said that the euphoria would have been there, regardless of whether the wins were legit or through bribes. I can only see bribes being relevant to a political discussion IF there were in fact a gigantic conspiracy to win the election for Noh, a conspiracy which started with rigging the Korea/Italy match. If such a conspiracy did exist, I suspect I would've heard about it from other sources besides disgruntled soccer fans on Dave's Cafe. Wouldn't the European press be all over this with investigations? Or have they all been bought off as well? As no one(to my knowledge) has come forward with credible evidence of corruption re: Italy-Korea, I think that any mention of it in a political discussion is simple ad hominem. That was my original point.
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gatohorrible



Joined: 02 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2003 2:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What matters is Lee Hoi Chang was defeated. Chung got the World Cup for korea , in an election year in which he was standing . He then got defeated in his bid to be candidate siding with Roh , and actually joining his team. Lee's defeat is the crumbling of the old order . for good or bad.
The World Cup actualy being IN Korea and the Korean team's 'success' are no co-incidences.
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