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What is a ricecake?
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billybrobby



Joined: 09 Dec 2004

PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2005 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyways, you're all insane. This is a ricecake:



and nothing else.

is some kind of marginally edible building compound.
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desultude



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Location: Dangling my toes in the Persian Gulf

PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2005 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

billybrobby wrote:
Anyways, you're all insane. This is a ricecake:



and nothing else.

is some kind of marginally edible building compound.


Those are styrofoam insolation or packing material. Never were edible. That's why they are so low calorie- it's not really food.

Song Pyun are soooo delicious.

(I did wonder about "rice cakes" when I first arrived here- thought they were tasteless wads of uncooked something. But for some odd reason I have grown to love them, well, most of them, anyway. A student brought me some made with mountain mugwort, and they were really vile.)
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VanIslander



Joined: 18 Aug 2003
Location: Geoje, Hadong, Tongyeong,... now in a small coastal island town outside Gyeongsangnamdo!

PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2005 2:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back in 2002 I first heard Ddokbokki () described by a Korean teacher at my hagwon as "thick rice noodles" in a hot sauce. It stuck. And I've taught it as that ever since.

But now that I've had more experience with other rice products, it could just as well be describes as the same as a wet rice cake, though it is in small tube shapes formed like noodles are through a machine, and they look like noodles, so the Korean teacher's original description stands for me: "thick rice noodles". (I think she's more enlightened than the average though.)

I won't be calling anything that is made like noodles are and looks like noodles are, a cake.

But then again, I don't accept the konglish (and partially international) use of "hand phone". It's a "mobile phone" or "cell phone". So my refusal to use "rice cakes" to describe an ingredient in ddokbokki runs deep.
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keithinkorea



Joined: 17 Mar 2004

PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2005 7:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Swiss James wrote:
keithinkorea wrote:

I cook at home because I'm a much better cook than 99.9% of Koreans who work in restaurants! I like the availability of good ingredients here, it is a challenge as Korea has such restrictions on imports so it is very seasonal. I'm from the UK so I can cook or make anything at anytime of the year and whilst there is a bit of a seasonal thing going on in the UK it is nothing compared to here.

Where I used to live come aspharagus season it is heaven! Aspharagus is the king of vegetables. In Korea it is pretty annoying-challenging and wallet wrenching to just cook what you want and eat as you want.

Korea needs to open its markets to imports from countries that produce better food than the Korean climate allows. A fresh asparagus kimchi thing would be pretty tasty I imagine.


wow- now there's a guy who really thinks his ddong doesn't stink


Well James most poo stinks doesn't it? and I'm sure mine is no exception. How much cooking is done in most Korean restraunts against how much let's all just chuck it in a pan and boil it up! Korean home cooking can be great but most restaraunts here are not good.

What do you have against getting better produce and Koreans markets being opened to competition? If they were'ny so molly coddled by protectionist government policies then they would have to produce better stuff.
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