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Korean Food for Newbies
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supernick



Joined: 24 Jan 2003
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 1:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe a new thread should be opened up dedicated to food.

It takes time to know what to order in Korea. Korean restaurants outside of Korea don't really represent some of the best of Korean food.

A great summer food in cold buck wheat noodles called naeng myun. A noodle dish served with ice, which is a real treat during the summer.

There's also the great selection of man-do. Originally Chinese wan-tahn, but the Korean version is great, and I would say better. You can have them steamed or fried.

Most Korean food is not hot. Just because host of it's red means nothing.

Any other good food suggestions to help out newbies?
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The Lemon



Joined: 11 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 1:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi supernick - thought it was a great idea so I split this off into its own thread & gave it a title. Thanks!
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Corporal



Joined: 25 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 2:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Neng myeon tastes like ****.
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katydid



Joined: 02 Feb 2003
Location: Here kitty kitty kitty...

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 3:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd add you can't go wrong with any kind of kimbab or dwenjang chigae. I love that stuff. Smile

And I think Naengmyun is good too, though I like the mul naengmyun better than the bibim naengmyun now, as it is less likely to stain my clothes. (Nothing like slurping a stubborn noodle that leaves little lines of gochujang on your white shirt.) There is a girl in my Korean class whom I had dinner with once....she saw the ice cubes floating in my naengmyun and was like "What is that??" Smile

My friend MIGHT be making her way as a tourist (not a crazy ESL teacher) Wink sometime in October, so I'll have to keep the food suggestions in mind for when she comes here. (Though out in L.A., when we went to this "Korean" restaurant -- just kalbi, just kimchi -- she found she liked the kimchi very much. Good for her. Heh.)
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Zyzyfer



Joined: 29 Jan 2003
Location: who, what, where, when, why, how?

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 3:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Honestly, kalbi is a good starter for the newly-arrived foreigner. Donggasuh also tends to go over well. Other food tends to be preferential...
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YiSunSin



Joined: 08 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 3:50 am    Post subject: MMMMMM Reply with quote

Chapchaebap
Hottok
Pulgogi
Kalbi
Kimchi

Safe bets anywhere.

Anyone else like the odd bit of hottok?
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Thomas



Joined: 25 Mar 2003

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 5:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's the food list I originally posted a while back... see the Job Information Journal... If your computer reads Korean, the original post has the Korean spellings as well... (Lots of delicious research went into this!)



When I first came here, I was taken out for many, many meals. Of course, every Korean wanted me to "try" the bibimbap and bulgogi. Granted, these are quite good, but after having bibimbap for lunch 38 times in a row and bulgogi for dinner 38 times in a row, (I am exaggerating), I decided to start trying new stuff on my own and from teachers' recommendations. I kept a little notebook with the Korean names and an English description. I hope you find this helpful. (In my humble opinion, Korean food is awesome.. I love it!)
1. (Sam Gyeop Sal) - Roasted side pork, usually wrapped in lettuce with seasoned soy bean paste.
2. (Kam Ja Tang) - A hearty stew made with potatoes and pork bones.
3. καġ (Too Boo Kimchee) - A plate of warm tofu and kimchee, often served with soju.
4.  (Bee Gee Chee Gay) - A thick stew made from the skins of the soybeans.
5. (In Jeol Mee) - Round or rectangular rice cakes brushed with bean powder.
6. ä (Jhap Chay) - A dish of clear noodles mixed with various vegetables.
7.  (Tien Jang Chee Gay) - A hearty stew of soy bean paste, tofu and vegetables.
8. Į (Kal Gook Soo) - Broad white flour noodles in a rich broth.
9. ġ (Cham Chee Boke Um) - Stir-fried tuna and kimchee with rice.
10. ø (Naeng Myeon) - Cold buckwheat noodles, served in an icy broth with various vegetables, a boiled egg and mustard paste.
11. (Kimbap) - Vegetables and ham rolled in rice and seaweed.
12. ġ (Cham Chee Kimbap)- Tuna and vegetables rolled in rice and seaweed.
13. (Noo Duh Kimbap) - Vegetables and other ingredients rolled in seaweed and rice with the rice facing out.
14. Ұ (Bool Gogi)- Marinated beef with mushrooms and other vegetables cooked in a pot.
15. ޱſ (Maegi Mae Oon Tang) - Spicy stew made with whole catfish.
16. (Tokk Boke Ee) - Cylindrical rice cakes boiled in hot sauce.
17. (Tokk Gook) - Flat round rice cakes in a thin broth, commonly served on Lunar New Year's Day.
18. (Nae Jang Tang) - Spicy soup made from fish intestines and vegetables.
19. ܹ (Tole Sut Bap) - Rice and vegetables served in a hot stone bowl.
20. ȣΰ (Hoe Doo Gwa Ja) - Sweet walnut cakes made in the shape of a walnut, famous in Chonan.
21. (Say Ooh Cheot) - Salted shrimp, used as a seasoning for pork or for making kimchee.
22. (So Long Tang) - A soup made from beef broth, spring onions, rice, salt, and red pepper paste.
23. ߰ (Tak Kal Bi) - Boneless chicken seasoned with spring onions, red pepper paste, sweet potatoes, rice cakes and garlic; usually wrapped in lettuce with seasoned soy bean paste.
24. (Tak Jook) - Thick porridge made from chicken broth, sticky rice, ginseng, garlic and salt.
25. (All Tang) - Spicy soup made from fish eggs, red pepper, spring onions and other seasonings.
26.  (Jang Oh Goo Ee) - Marinated and barbecued eel filets wrapped in lettuce.
27. (Sam Gye Tang) - A whole chicken stuffed with rice, jujubes, garlic and ginseng and boiled whole.

Posted: July 3, 2001


Taken from : http://www.eslcafe.com/jobinfo/asia/sefer.cgi?display:994208288-22530.txt
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The Lemon



Joined: 11 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 6:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great post, Thomas! Everyone else, if you can't read his hangul, go up to "view" in IE and change the "encoding" to Korean.
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Cedar



Joined: 11 Mar 2003
Location: In front of my computer, again.

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 7:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I was new to Korea I found that Kalguksu (knife cut noodles) was a great way to go. As spicy as you add the sauce to it, and very filling. Not the ideal summer weather food, though. I like Naengmyun in the summer but it doesn't fill me up, for filling cold noodles try "Koengguksu" which looks like noodles in milk. It's really a bean powder thing in the water.
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Son Deureo!



Joined: 30 Apr 2003

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fun topic. Thank you, Thomas. Your post in the job information journal went a long way towards improving my diet in my first few months in Korea.

My personal favorite for cheap, good Korean food is the kimbap restaurants. They have a lot more than kimbap, they're fast, and rarely cost more than 4000 won for a meal. Here are a few of my favorite kimbap restaurant meals that aren't listed above:


(Jeh Yook Deop Bap) - Spicy pork with vegetables over rice.
(Yook Gae Jahng) - Spicy chopped beef soup
Ұһ (Bulgogi Ddook Bbae Ghee) Bulgogi with vegetables served boiling hot in a clay bowl

I'm also a big fan of:

(Saeng Seon Ghoo Ee) Broiled fish. If you don't mind your dinner looking back at you, it's hard to go wrong with this one. There are lots of great varieties of fish to try here. Looking up the names in a Korean-English dictionary wasn't much help because I'd never heard of them in English.
ߵ (Dalk Doe Rhee Tahng) Spicy chicken stew. Usually only seems to come in portions big enough to feed 3 or more people.
(Jjeem Dalk) Chicken, sweet potato noodles (same stuff that's in ChapChae), potatoes, and hot peppers in soy sauce. I haven't met a Westerner yet who didn't love this (unless they couldn't handle spicy). If you can, get the boneless () version, much easier to eat with chopsticks
(Mohk Sahl) Pork neck steak. Much more appetizing than it sounds. When you're at a pork restaurant, give this a try instead of dwaeji kalbi or samgyeopsal. IMHO a much better cut of pork for (usually) the same price as samgyeopsal.
ȣ (Hoe Bahk Jook) Pumpkin soup. Not really a meal, served as a side dish, and can even make a good dessert. It's sweet, and kind of reminds me of warm tapioca pudding for reasons I can't explain.

And of course, the quintessential Korean summer dessert:

Ϻ- (Paht Bing Soo) A bowl of shaved ice with sweetened red bean paste, fruit, and little candies and/or sugar coated rice cake bits with condensed milk or ice cream. Just try it. If the idea of beans for dessert freaks you out you can always have Ϻ (fruit bing soo) instead. In the summer you can get Paht Bing Soo just about everywhere, including McDonalds and Lotteria.
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Hyalucent



Joined: 16 Jan 2003
Location: British North America

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Something else for new people to know, (I hope nobody else said it already) is that if you go into a restaurant and order "Baekban", you'll get a simple, cheap meal of rice and "soup of the day" along with a number of side dishes. The best part is that when you don't speak a lot of Korean, you only have to memorize the one word and you'll end up with a fair bit of variety each time.
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little mixed girl



Joined: 11 Jun 2003
Location: shin hyesung's bed~

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

...

Last edited by little mixed girl on Tue Apr 15, 2008 5:46 am; edited 1 time in total
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Sliver



Joined: 04 May 2003
Location: The third dimension

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 4:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Something else for new people to know, (I hope nobody else said it already) is that if you go into a restaurant and order "Baekban", you'll get a simple, cheap meal of rice and "soup of the day" along with a number of side dishes. The best part is that when you don't speak a lot of Korean, you only have to memorize the one word and you'll end up with a fair bit of variety each time.


This is similar to Jeong shik.

I can't believe no one has mentioned Korean pancake. In Pusan usually called Pa Jeon and I think in Seoul Buchingae. It differs marketly from area to area. If anyone ever comes to Pusan I recommend going on the cable car to the top of the mountain in OncheonJang and ordering Pa Jeon. A little expensive up there (7000 won) but delicious when cooked fresh and eaten with the view from atop the mountain.
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em



Joined: 15 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The loveliest thank-you possible to Thomas, Son Deureo, hyalucent, and Sliver!! When I started reading this new thread I thought "oh, great, they are talking to each other again! Wink All these food names mean nothing to me." Your descriptions are extremely helpful.

One question about the pancakes. At the Korean restaurant that I go to here in Toronto, they always give us Kimchee Pancakes to start - mmmmmm, yummy! But no one here has mentioned the kimchee variety of pancake - do they make 'em in Korea???
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Wombat



Joined: 28 May 2003
Location: slutville

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Korean pancakes are fantastic! Eat them! Eat them at every chance! Push out the jive, bring in the Love!

Actually - don't eat them heaps; they're fairly oily. But delicous.

Another groovy food (but a huge shock to the Western palette, possibly) is Janbon; I'm not sure how to transliterate it. It's insanely spicy Chinese soup; it's red, got bits of squid and cockels in it; some noodles; onion and capsicum. It's great it you like spice.

Wombat Smile
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