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The Korean Language Question And Answer Thread
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out of context



Joined: 08 Jan 2006
Location: Daejeon

PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2008 1:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HapKi wrote:
what's the difference between 새 and 새로운 ?


There's a book called 국어 실력이 밥 먹여준다 that actually covers a lot of these similar-but-not-the-same word pairs and triplets. Here's what it says about 새 and 새로운:

새: Something that did not exist before has appeared for the first time, or something that already exists has changed in some essential way

새로운: Something that already existed was improved or underwent some partial change in its existing state

I don't think there's anything disrespectful about 구차하다.
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kiwiduncan



Joined: 18 Jun 2007
Location: New Zealand

PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2008 2:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ABC KID wrote:
Can anyone help me out with this one?

How do you say the following sentence in Korean?
I could tell by the way she looked at me that she had not forgotten about yesterday.



It's taken from a fiction book. My Korean is okay but I'm no expert. Here is my attempt at translating the sentence:

나는 그녀가 나를 보는 것을 통해 그녀가 어제에 대해 잊어버리지 않았었다는 것을 알라챘다.

Is my translation okay? Or can one of the Korean experts here do a better or more natural sounding job for me? Thanks, very much.


You've done a pretty literal translation of the sentence whereas I'm guessing a translation from a Korean person would take quite a different form. Don't take this as a criticism though. Your Korean looks better than mine but I think all language learners have tendency to do quite literal translations as we often don't have the depth of cultural knowledge that is required for more natural sounding speech.

If we are to stick with a more literal translation I'm wondering if '그녀가 나를 보는 모습을 통해' might be a little better as it puts more emphasis on the the woman's posture or expression.

I'm also wondering if it would be better just to say "어제를 잊어버리지 않았었다는 것" or maybe "어제 일어난 일". Again, it's moving away from a literal translation but might sound a bit more natural.

Finally, maybe "깨닫다" might be better than "알아채다" as, if the dictionary is anything to go by, "알아채다" is generally used when sensing a menace, danger or threat.

This is a really cool thread you've got going here. I hope some of the really high level speakers or even native Korean speakers will pitch in too.

I fear my own contributions will be more a case of "the blind leading the near-sighted" Very Happy
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out of context



Joined: 08 Jan 2006
Location: Daejeon

PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2008 2:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The literal translation makes sense, but it is a bit awkward, and that's something that only time can really take care of. I might say something like (그녀가) 나를 보는 모습을 보니까 어제 일어났던 일을 다 잊지 못한 것을 알 수 있었다, though that's far from perfect. A lot of the pronouns get dropped anyway when the context makes it apparent.
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ABC KID



Joined: 14 Sep 2007

PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2008 3:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kiwiduncan wrote:
Quote:
Your Korean looks better than mine


별 말씀을...

Quote:
but I think all language learners have tendency to do quite literal translations as we often don't have the depth of cultural knowledge that is required for more natural sounding speech.


A good point for people to note who are reading this thread but are still relatively new to the language.

Quote:
I hope some of the really high level speakers or even native Korean speakers will pitch in too.


나도 그래요.

Quote:
I fear my own contributions will be more a case of "the blind leading the near-sighted"


You're doing great so far... I appreciate it and I hope others do too Very Happy
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Ilsanman



Joined: 15 Aug 2003
Location: Bucheon, Korea

PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2008 5:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you mistranslated it. But only slightly.

My understanding of the meaning of 김 is 'since'. For example...

시내에 가는 김에 영화 보자

Since we're going downtown, let's see a movie (too).

I have always understood it and used it in that way, and I was always understood.

pesawattahi wrote:
It means while you were doing A B happened.
The first sentance means "When I was coming to my hometown I will go meeting my friend", did you write the sentence or see it somewhere? It looks all jacked up from my perspective, but then again I'm not a native.

As far as the markers go ㄹ is future, ㄴ is past, and 는 is present/past.
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kiwiduncan



Joined: 18 Jun 2007
Location: New Zealand

PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2008 5:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

out of context wrote:
The literal translation makes sense, but it is a bit awkward, and that's something that only time can really take care of. I might say something like (그녀가) 나를 보는 모습을 보니까 어제 일어났던 일을 다 잊지 못한 것을 알 수 있었다, though that's far from perfect. A lot of the pronouns get dropped anyway when the context makes it apparent.


I feel silly now, since your suggestion of '알 수 있었다" is the best, most natural and most literal translation of 'I could tell (know).."

One of the traps I regularly fall into is trying to use any newly acquired Korean vocabulary in some random conversation later in the day. The result is that I often use arcane and innapropriate words in the wrong context. Similarly, I'll ask a Korean student to go over something I've written and he'll end up removing a lot of the more complicated words and replacing them with the basic equivalents. Still, that's what we do for our Korean students too I guess. It's nice to see how language learners feel.
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ABC KID



Joined: 14 Sep 2007

PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 2:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been watching the news on TV alot recently and I keep hearing and seeing the same word again and again (인수위). I've also seen 잇따라 quite a few times. I'm guessing 인수위 means 'agenda' or something similar but can one of the Korean experts help me out please?

What do 인수위 and 잇따라 mean?
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out of context



Joined: 08 Jan 2006
Location: Daejeon

PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 2:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

인수위 is the committee for the transition between presidential administrations. The full name is the 제17대 대통령직인수위원회. So after Lee Myung-bak is sworn in you likely won't be seeing that word for a while.

잇따라 just means "(many incidents) following one after another".
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asylum seeker



Joined: 22 Jul 2007
Location: On your computer screen.

PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 7:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ABC KID wrote:
Cliffhanger wrote:
I have a question I have been wondering about for awhile.

What does the verb ending 잖아 mean? Not sure about the spelling there.

I always hear sentences like "blah blah 있잖아요." but don't know what they are saying.


I'm very pleased to see people suddenly start using this thread in the nature it was intended and I think I can answer this question for you...

잖아(요) means 'You know ___/You know it's ___'
잖아요? means 'Don't you know ____?'

Example (1) - Someone telephones their friend early Sunday morning.
Friend complains, 오늘은 일요일이잖아요? - Don't you know it's Sunday?

Example (2) - Someone asks if their friend wants to visit Japan.
Friend answers, 나는 돈이 없잖아요 - You know I've got no money.


Thanls for that, I've asked Koreans several times and never got a sensible answer from them Razz 매우 유용해!
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jvalmer



Joined: 06 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2008 5:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've notice that students often, especially female students, will start off with "선생님...있잖아요...blah blah..." when talking to a teacher.

I always assumed that the "있잔아요" was just some polite way to ask a question or request something from someone. Although literally it means "There is" or "you know what..."
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jackson7



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Location: Kim Jong Il's Future Fireball

PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2008 5:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My K-gf first explained 있잖아~ (because she says it A LOT) as "This is the thing..." or "What I'm trying to say is..." or "What I mean is..." which could all be close to the "Don't you know..." that others have suggested. As much of language is, this is a feeling that doesn't translate exactly into words, but times to use it appropriately seem to match up to my above suggestions.
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ABC KID



Joined: 14 Sep 2007

PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bovinerebel wrote:

I was hoping someone would invest a little of their sweet time to provide a translation in Hangul (i'm terrible at spelling in it) and maybe the english phonetic .I know most of these but for the sake of having the list on hand in case I forget , or anyone else is looking to learn. Obviously ignore in the case that their is no direct translation and adapt as necessary. I'll keep it short and people can add request and hopefully we'll get a good beginner lexicon going that'll see you by.

You asked for so many words. We are busy people! I think this should get you started. Maybe others will chip in...

Question words

Why : 왜
What : 무엇
When : 언제
How : 어떻게
Who : 누구
What time : 몇 시
Whose : 누구의
Which : 어느


Pro nouns

I/Me : 나 or 저
We : 우리
You : 당신 (and others - you have a lot to learn!!)
them : 그들을
It : 그것
These : 이것들
Those : 그것들

Possesives

My : 내
Your : 당신의 (and others - you have a lot to learn!!)
our : 우리
theirs : 그들의


other (conjunctions etc)

because : 왜냐하면
but : 하지만
and : 그리고
therefore : 그래서
instead : 그대신
then : 그러면
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bovinerebel



Joined: 27 Feb 2008

PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks ABC .....anyone want to do the verbs/adjectives etc and explain the adverbs suffix/comparitives ?

Quote:
You asked for so many words. We are busy people!


Oh sorry. I thought you were teachers like me. Thanks person...that's a good start.
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Bramble



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Location: National treasures need homes

PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bovinerebel wrote:
thanks ABC .....anyone want to do the verbs/adjectives etc and explain the adverbs suffix/comparitives ?

Quote:
You asked for so many words. We are busy people! I think this should get you started. Maybe others will chip in...


Oh sorry. I thought you were teachers like me.


Maybe MissSeoul will post something?
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bovinerebel



Joined: 27 Feb 2008

PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

These are still outstanding....

To be bored :
To be tired (sleepy):
to be tired (from exercise) :
To be hungry :
To be sad :
To be happy :
To be annoyed/irritated :
To be interested :
To be full (no longer hungry) :
To be stressed out :
To be angry :
To be disgusted :
To be exited :
To be dissapointed :
To be thirsty :
To be in love :
to love :
To be insulted :
To be amused :
to like :
to hate :
to not care about :

Adjectives

Beautiful (girl) :
Beauitufk (place) :
Handsome :
Interesting :
Ugly :
Stupid :
Smart :
Annoying :
Boring :
Old :
Young :
Tall :
Short :
Big :
Small :
Long :
Fashionable :
Lazy :
Diligent :
Naughty :
Good :
Bad :

Car :
Bus :
Train :
Station :
Restuarant :
Cinema :
Singing room :
Bar :
Movie :
Song :
Music :
Book :
Home :
Convenience store :

Prepositions of place :

In :
on :
under :
next to :
opposite :


Thanks folks..please add anything if you think it'll come up a lot in daily small talk.
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