Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Korean Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

The Korean Language Question And Answer Thread
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 58, 59, 60 ... 64, 65, 66  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> General Discussion Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
CrikeyKorea



Joined: 01 Jun 2007
Location: Heogi, Seoul

PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2012 6:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
As an aside, my girlfriend's mum uses this form whenever she asks me a question in writing (kakaotalk) - I've not seen anybody else do that so I'm not sure how common it is but she'll say things like "존 어디 있는지?". Never heard it in speech though. Maybe it's dialect (she's from Cheongju), but I'm not sure.


This is kinda like when you say, Hey do you know where... John... is? halfway through asking the question about John, do you know, and before you say the rest of the sentence because the rest is obvious you jump in and finish off with yeh, he is at Emart.. or wherever so that the person asking the question doesn't have to finish off the rest of the question... if that makes sense
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
thatkidpercy



Joined: 05 Sep 2010

PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2012 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know what you mean and certainly in spoken language it'd be common for the other person to interject before you finish the question, but this was in a written message which is why it threw me! This didn't happen but an example conversation might be:

Girlfriend's mum: 존 어디 있는지?
Me: 지금 이마트인데 곧 집으로 들어가요
Girlfriend's mum: 거기서 뭐 사는지?

I'm not suggesting it's wrong, but my ears expect to hear "어디 있어?" / "어디 있냐?" / "어디야?" etc. if a question is being asked about my whereabouts.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
joesp



Joined: 16 Jan 2008

PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2012 1:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alright, I have no Korean to ask

흐어 저 아름다운 4등신 몸매!! 너무 사랑스러워요 ㅠㅠ

this is from Facebook, which should only be in English BTW....
what is "4등신"?

This one girl put up a picture of a dog standing on its hind legs, with its belly exposed and front and paws in the air, if that's relevant ....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
thatkidpercy



Joined: 05 Sep 2010

PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

joesp wrote:

what is "4등신"?


I think that's how you measure the size of someone's body in heads. In this case, the dog's height standing up measures 4x the height of its head.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Enigma



Joined: 20 Mar 2008

PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2012 10:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Turning down an offer of food

I go hiking every weekend and Korean hikers sometimes offer me food. Sometimes I accept but other times I've already eaten or don't want to stop. When they offer, they usually speak very quickly so I can't catch exactly what they're saying, but it's clear they're asking if I want to join them and have something to eat with them. I'm usually caught off guard and just say the first thing that comes to my head, for example, "Kwenchanayo. Kamsahamnida." (spelling?) I believe it's correct, but I'm guessing it sounds unnatural.
So in this situation, how do I say something that says something along the lines of, "Thank you, I appreciate the offer, but no thank you." Preferably it's not too long, and also something I could pronounce that Koreans would understand.

Thanks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
thatkidpercy



Joined: 05 Sep 2010

PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2012 9:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To be honest I think what you're saying sounds fine. If you want to make it a little more emphatic, you could say something like "너무 고맙습니다만 관찮아요" (neomu gomap-seumnidaman, kwen-chan-a-yo / Thank you so much, but I'm okay)

Or, if you want to give a reason you could just change the end of the sentence:

너무 고맙습니다만...
... 시간이 없어요 (shigan-ee eobseo-yo / I don't have time)
... 빨리 가야돼요 (balli gaya-de-yo / I have to keep going quickly)
... 배가 터질 것 같아요 (be-ga teo-jil-geo gat-a-yo / I'm already full to bursting)

I'd probably go with the last one personally, if I was turning down an offer of food. In any case, I don't think what you're saying is unnatural!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jonpurdy



Joined: 08 Jan 2009
Location: Ulsan

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2012 12:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thatkidpercy wrote:
joesp wrote:

what is "4등신"?


I think that's how you measure the size of someone's body in heads. In this case, the dog's height standing up measures 4x the height of its head.


Yep. 7등신 and 8등신 are desirable as it indicates a small head and tall height. Most Koreans fall into 6등신. Feel free to joke around with friends about it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Enigma



Joined: 20 Mar 2008

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2012 5:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey thanks for the reply, thatkidpercy. You gave me some great phrases to use there.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
padme



Joined: 05 Jul 2012

PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2012 10:03 pm    Post subject: Want to improve your Korean language skills? Reply with quote

I know a really awesome tutor so just pm me and I'll give you the details (plus I won't spam you after that ^^)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
joesp



Joined: 16 Jan 2008

PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2012 3:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

파리에 사는 친구가 한 명 있어요.

Me no like space between 한 and 명 ... I hate KOrean spacing. 도와 주세요.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
eumyang



Joined: 01 Jan 2010

PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2012 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

joesp wrote:
파리에 사는 친구가 한 명 있어요.

Me no like space between 한 and 명 ... I hate KOrean spacing. 도와 주세요.

What do you need help with? Translation? 명 is a counter word for people, so 한 명 would be 1 person, 두 명 would be 2 people, and so on. As for your sentence, I would translate it this way:
There is (or I have) one friend who lives in Paris.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
joesp



Joined: 16 Jan 2008

PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2012 12:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi again.

My question is, is there a space between "한" and "명".

I finally looked this up, if it is like 명 or 마리 or 번 or 개 or 자루 then it is a 의존형사 (dependent noun) and you put a space, but if it is a 조사 (particle) then you leave no space.

====================
I have one other nagging question.

how do I know whether or not to put a 는 on 게 in this Korean-written sentence:

이 옷이 낡았을망정 내게 특별한 의미가 있는 거예요.

I have a fairly good group on 는 vs. 이 as you can see on my site subject_marker_vs._topic_marker
but I cannot figure out why they say 게는 here ....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
thatkidpercy



Joined: 05 Sep 2010

PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2012 3:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you're confusing the 게 in that sentence with a different meaning... 내게 is a contraction of 나에게, not 내것이.

To me, the 는 here is highlighting the fact that this item of clothing is special to me. Without the 는 it sounds like the clothing could be important to other people too, but using 내게 implies that it's only important to me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
joesp



Joined: 16 Jan 2008

PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2012 11:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually think you may be correct. 는 can be used to set things apart. However, there is no difference in English between it is special to me and it is special to me. Here is another example:

한국에서 외국인등록증을 영어로 "alien registration card"이라고 하다니 참 재미있어요.

why on earth do they feel the need to add 는 ? With or without the 는, I see no difference in meaning. Am I supposed to learn this, or this fall beyonds my capability given that my native language is English? Like, fixing articles for Koreans.
=========================

I actually came back here to say that I finally figured out whether to say 다선 번 or 오 번. The answer is, "both". That is, with 번 you can use either the pure Korean or the Sino-Korean numbers.

한 번
one time

일번 number one

So, when I go into McDonald's I should say "일번 세트 주세요" (set number one) and when I want to say I did it five times, that is 다섯 번 했어요
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
padme



Joined: 05 Jul 2012

PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2012 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thatkidpercy wrote:

To me, the 는 here is highlighting the fact that this item of clothing is special to me. Without the 는 it sounds like the clothing could be important to other people too, but using 내게 implies that it's only important to me.


My Korean tutor confirmed this. Adding the '는' places more emphasis on the object that it is attached to (in that sentence it places an emphasis on 'me'). I learned something new, too! Thanks for that interesting question.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> General Discussion Forum All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 58, 59, 60 ... 64, 65, 66  Next
Page 59 of 66

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2013 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International