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Stupid Packing Lists : From the Vets
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panthermodern



Joined: 08 Feb 2003
Location: Taxronto

PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2003 8:59 am    Post subject: Stupid Packing Lists : From the Vets Reply with quote

So your going home and you know that you are coming back, what do you pack for the return journey? In other words what crazy stuff did you return to Korea with?

(maybe newbies will get some idea of other stuff to bring)

panthermodern's latest packing list:

5 369g tins of Tim Horton's Coffee
10 packages of dried Swiss Chalet Sauce
10 packages of dried taco spice
10 packages of dried sloppy joe mix
10 packages of various other dired mixes (like faita ect)
10 packages of dried salad dressing (caesar)
50 packages of Neo-Citrain of various kinds
1000 asprins
2 hockey sticks
10 rolls hockey tape
5 kg of bulk kraft mac and cheese powder
10 sticks of deoderant (various flavors)
20 Mach 3 razor blades
1 L plastic bottle of Motreal Spice
1 L plastic bottle of Cajun Spice
2 copies of "Take-Out Weight Curling" SWEEP! (PC Game)
and
1 Hamilton Tiger Cats Hat (OSKIE WEE WEE!)

panthers tips of the month:

-spices are a good way of bringing home with you.
-you can buy alot of cool stuff at bulk food stores.
-by far the best luggage you can buy is a hockey goalie bag with extendable luggage tow handle and rollerblade wheel wheels.

A 250L "Team Canada" model was avalibe at Cosco for $50. Plus 50% of all profits went to the junior national team.
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hack



Joined: 24 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2003 9:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting post Panther cuz Im just starting to think about what I'll take when i return in a few weeks. You're right about the hockey bag-but I'm worried that it may draw an excess luggage charge. And great advice on the bulk food bins.
My biggest challenge is trying to figure out how to get 1000 litres of Motts Clamato juice in a small container. I wish it was in powder form.
My only addition to your list is to invest in a really good pair of walking shoes like Rockport, Eccos or something like that because you tend to do a lot of walking there. I looked at them there and if you can find your size, they are about 50% higher cost.
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panthermodern



Joined: 08 Feb 2003
Location: Taxronto

PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2003 9:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

well Hack, you can't compress liquids so your outta luck, good choice though, mmmmm bloody caesars ....

as for the shoes I only wear Dr. Martens which you can get in Seoul for less than in Canada (when you take take into account).

The baggage guy at the ariport on Dec 28 2002, said that thier would be an extra charge on hockey bags in 2003, but I would still suggest it, the money you save on the bag you can use to pay the fee.

I also have a CCM bag I bought for $35 which is 350 L !
I could use it as an emergency shelter if I had to.

CYA

panthermodern
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Bulsajo



Joined: 16 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2003 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
the hockey bag-but I'm worried that it may draw an excess luggage charge.


Yes it was an excellent suggestion. I brought a goalie bag myself- the trick is to use it only for clothing in order to stuff it to the max but not go over 30 kgs.
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The Den



Joined: 26 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2003 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Panthermodern, I'm with you on the Tim Horton's coffee. But what about the hockey sticks. Are you alluding to the fact that there is a game in Korea. Please please let me know as I am planning a trip next year and don't know how I will give it up for a whole winter. I had heard rumours of ice in Pusan and Seoul when I was there but I never checked it out. Is there anything remotely similar to rec leagues in Canada. Anyway I am dying to find out. Also, can you not buy hockey equipment there? like sticks and basic stuff like tape. Do foreigners ever get together and play road hockey or just shoot a ball around?
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jsmac



Joined: 16 Jan 2003
Location: Gangwon-do

PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2003 2:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, please elaborate on the state of hockey in Korea. Does it exist outside of Pusan, Seoul & other major metro areas? I've just been getting my game back after 3 years off skates and it's a shame to quit now.
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exportedhabster



Joined: 10 Feb 2003
Location: Suwon

PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2003 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've gotten together with some other teachers and played street hockey (in an Ajou University parking lot, Suwon City just outsite of Seoul). They play every weekend in the spring and part of the summer. Some people take it a little too seriously for my taste however. My friend played in a league with roller blades and full equipment, I don't know where. I also heard they play with roller blades and full equipment at Olympic park in Seoul. One of my students said he played real hockey in a league in Suwon, I think he said Top-dong arena. I also heard they have a league in Iteawon. Sticks are usually expensive here, but I got one in Suwon for about 40,000 won, my friend had a hard time finding a stick for a left-handed person. Hockey is here, just a matter of finding it. They also have a Korean hockey league, but it is rarely televised and isn't even the quality of high school hockey in Canada. Good fundamentals, but lacking speed and grit!!
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Zyzyfer



Joined: 29 Jan 2003
Location: who, what, where, when, why, how?

PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2003 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ESL4Kids wrote:
1 oz. REAL curry power


Currrrrrry POWER!

Er, I didn't bring an awful lot back Korea-side with me.

7 boxes Mac and Cheese(couldn't fit more)
Phantasy Star Collection(English game, yay)
Ny-quil
Benadryl
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BTM



Joined: 20 Jan 2003
Location: Back in the saddle.

PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2003 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of the guys who works with me at my university plays real hockey in a rec league here in Seoul with a bunch of other teachers. I'll mail the link to this thread to him, and maybe he can elaborate for ya.
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Manner of Speaking



Joined: 09 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2003 5:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It took coming to Korea to wean me off of Tim Horton's brew for good...used to line up every morning at the takeout at the downtown mall, me and 200 other IT workers. Honestly, they must put cocaine in the stuff or something, the way people suck it back. Went shopping today and stared longingly at the foreign food section in Walmart...olive oil, peanut butter, havarti cheese...** sigh ** (I'm on a diet so I didn' buy anything). There's not many things I miss from home but I do miss dill havarti...jarlsberg and feta cheese...greek olives...sun-dried tomatoes...jamaican patties...donairs... Sad
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atina



Joined: 19 Jan 2003
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2003 5:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bras (nothing but A cup exists here, and a few B's, C does NOT exist!!!!)

THat reminds me of a funny story: shopping for a bikini I found one I really liked but the top looked too small, however the saleslady insisted that ONE SIZE FITS ALL! so I said "Oh REALLY!" and I took the bikini top put it on and showed it to her. Her response: Oooooh! ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL!

back to the list:

toothpaste and real toothbrushes
food (try to understand that very little you like exists here and if it does- it costs 3 times what it does at home)
clothes whitener
quality shoes
noxema
bed sheets and bath towels (what you can find if you can find is very expensive)
spices
video tapes with NA television (they're worth money here!!)
movies without subtitles
condoms (korean condoms are small and poor quality- I'm a safety girl Wink )

I'll add more later
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keguri



Joined: 01 Feb 2003
Location: Jacksonville, FL

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2003 10:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One thing I am definitely bringing with me when I return to Korea is a Brita water filtration pitcher and at least a half dozen replacement filters. I hate schlepping so many bottles of water up the hills and up the stairs every couple of days (I drink a lot of water), and I also hate having to recycle all those empty bottles. Does anyone think it would be pointless to try to filter the Korean tap water? If so, do you have a better idea?
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hack



Joined: 24 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2003 10:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I took a Nikken water bottle there that had its own filter in it. I also used it in Mexico. I drank tap water all year and even filled it up several times from lakes, streams, washroom faucets and water fountains, when hiking and never once got sick. The only thing it won't filter is salt water. Apparently its such a great filter you can even filter your own urine through it but I didn't test that.
The downside is that its expensive-about $50 or more Canadian and you can only buy it from a Nikken MLM agent. Type Nikken in on your search engine-they have agents virtually everywhere.
As for the Britta-I have heard that works well in most North American environments but not sources of water that have disease in them. Apparently, Nikken can handle that, but do your own research on how far to trust it. As I said it worked fine for me in Korea and Mexico.
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em



Joined: 15 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2003 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, there's no way that a Brita would be sufficient. Maybe boiling and then Brita for taste?
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exportedhabster



Joined: 10 Feb 2003
Location: Suwon

PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2003 6:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use boiled water for instant coffee and have not had any problems that I know of!!
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