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Dual Citizenship - Why doesn't Korea allow it?
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Hanson



Joined: 20 Oct 2004

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 1:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
No. In other words, "natural". People naturally associate with those most like them.


You really are bending over backwards trying to justify Korea's dual citizenship process.

Once again, cuz you still haven't answered:

Hanson wrote:
Quote:
Other posters already answered why dual citizenship is usually not a good idea for Korea


What, other than military service and possibly the fact that Korea is technically at war, are these good ideas you speak of?


Look at all the other countries I listed above. Why do those countries see it fit to allow dual citizenship, but Korea (namely) doesn't? Your answer is the equivalent of "just because".

This is a big reason why Korea gets a bad rep internationally. They aren't accepting of people who are not pure Korean. That's racism. If the gov't set the example, people would change their xenophobic views over time.
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Hanson



Joined: 20 Oct 2004

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 1:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adventurer wrote:

Hanson said the Arab countries allow it so why doesn't Korea? Egypt is the only Arab country that allows it, and it's a relatively new law. It did not exist in 2001 when I was teaching English there. They were talking about it, but it does look bad when a country that is less advanced then Korea allows it and most OECD countries allow it.


Actually...
Quote:
Unlike South Korea, nationals of most Arab countries besides Saudi Arabia permit multiple citizenship


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Korean_nationality_law

Adventurer wrote:
You said it is good for Korea? I disagree. The laws penalize Korean Americans and Korean Canadians and Korean Russians as well who are of their ethnicity and Korea has a low birth-rate, and it could help them
tap into skilled people from their ethnicity at least. They should at least change that. Also, if they allow foreigners who are married to Koreans to become citizens it encourages Koreans to adapt more international norms when it comes to doing business in order to compete with foreigners in the domestic market, and it's necessary for Korea's long-term growth. Anyway, the citizenship law is sexist. Why? It allows a
child of a Korean father to become a citizen, but it doesn't allow a child who has a British father to be a citizen. The biggest loser is Korea when it comes to this. They need people with creative ideas.


Agreed wholeheartedly.
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ryouga013



Joined: 14 Sep 2007

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 1:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why would you want to be anything other than Korean? Showing your desire to be something other than Korean means you're already less than pure, so you should get the hell out - a nationalistic Korean's thoughts on dual citizenship
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Geckoman



Joined: 07 Jun 2007

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 5:06 am    Post subject: Koreans Rush to Guam and Saipan for US Citizenship Babies! Reply with quote

This reminds me of how Koreans have been rushing to Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands (NMI) -- of which the largest island is Saipan -- to give birth so that their new born baby will have American citizenship. It has been going on for years and has created a whole industry in those two American territories.

See: http://forums.eslcafe.com/korea/viewtopic.php?t=97500&highlight=

Cool
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Scotticus



Joined: 18 Mar 2007

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 5:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Captain Corea wrote:

Do not many countries have a clause about children being born on their soil?


The only one I know of is the US. I'm sure other countries have clauses like that, but I think they're the exception rather than the rule.
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skdragon



Joined: 28 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 5:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hanson wrote:
justaguy wrote:
Too many Koreans would claim to be a foreigner so they could skip out on their military service obligations.

Korean guys generally do not like people who try to weasel out of their army service.


Ok, so why not say "If you do your military service - you can have both..."? At least that way they could carry both. I'm not saying it would be worth it to go through two-plus years of military, I'm just saying the possibility could be offered, if that's the only obstacle to outright dual citizenship.

We all know it is not just the 2+ years, but they have to go back for training throughout their life.
So, if your wife switched to being Aussie then can you tell me your visa class? I maybe facing a similar situation soon.
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Rob'sdad



Joined: 12 May 2008
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 5:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In Germany, you had to choose by your 18th birthday. If you selected German citizenship then you could be drafted into the Bundeswehr.

But unlike Korea, Germans could choose to work in the Red Cross or the local (dorf) volunteer fire department. In our small town, training consisted of learning about some hazardous chemicals and then ingesting beer until closing.

If you have an Irish grandparent you can qualify for Irish citizenship. Great grandparents....no
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Hanson



Joined: 20 Oct 2004

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 5:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

skdragon wrote:
Hanson wrote:
justaguy wrote:
Too many Koreans would claim to be a foreigner so they could skip out on their military service obligations.

Korean guys generally do not like people who try to weasel out of their army service.


Ok, so why not say "If you do your military service - you can have both..."? At least that way they could carry both. I'm not saying it would be worth it to go through two-plus years of military, I'm just saying the possibility could be offered, if that's the only obstacle to outright dual citizenship.

We all know it is not just the 2+ years, but they have to go back for training throughout their life.
So, if your wife switched to being Aussie then can you tell me your visa class? I maybe facing a similar situation soon.


My wife became a naturalized Australian long before I met her. I'm on a work visa through my uni.
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Unposter



Joined: 04 Jun 2006

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 6:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Obviously, the reason why South Korea does not allow dual citizenship is because every Korean who could afford a plane ticket to Guam would have dual citizenship and try to avoid the draft.

I heard that until 1986 when Kim Youngsam became President, Koreans could not travel abroad (for any reason) without government aproval. Basically, only essential government and business related travel was allowed. I guess they wanted to keep the rats from jumping ship.

Korea really needs to end compulsary military service. It creates more problems than it solves. One of these problems is dual citizenship.

I truly hope that this law changes before my kids are 18. It would really make me sad if my kids would have to turn their back on part of their heritage over something like this.

Minimumly, Korea really should offer special dual citizenship for the children of international marriages. But, I guess it is hard to find National Assembly Members to really care, much less make the effort to submit such legislation.
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Thiuda



Joined: 14 Mar 2006
Location: Religion ist für Sklaven geschaffen, für Wesen ohne Geist.

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 6:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adventurer wrote:


Anyway, the citizenship law is sexist. Why? It allows a
child of a Korean father to become a citizen, but it doesn't allow a child who has a British father to be a citizen.


Where do you get your information? My daughter holds German/Korean citizenship; her mother is Korean. When she reaches the age of majority, she'll have to choose whether or not to keep her Korean citizenship in lieu of the others, but until then she can hold Korean citizenship and travel on a Korean passport.
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Thiuda



Joined: 14 Mar 2006
Location: Religion ist für Sklaven geschaffen, für Wesen ohne Geist.

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 6:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rob'sdad wrote:
In Germany, you had to choose by your 18th birthday. If you selected German citizenship then you could be drafted into the Bundeswehr.

But unlike Korea, Germans could choose to work in the Red Cross or the local (dorf) volunteer fire department. In our small town, training consisted of learning about some hazardous chemicals and then ingesting beer until closing.

If you have an Irish grandparent you can qualify for Irish citizenship. Great grandparents....no


So, where's your Dorf? In our small town (29614), training consisted in squishing a CPR doll and then ingesting beer until closing.
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Chris_Dixon



Joined: 09 Jan 2008

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 6:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Medic wrote:
Robert Holley the owner of the Gwangju Foreign school where CPN taught had to tear up his U.S. passport when he became a Korean citizen. Doesn't mean a hell of beans though, because you will always be a citizen of where you were born. All one has to do is go back to ones home country and apply for a passport again. He can still sponsor his family to be permanent residents and eventually U.S. citizens.


yeah i dont understand what people are complaining about. hand in your passport, then apply again for one??

Wouldnt this work?
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poohbear



Joined: 08 Feb 2008
Location: toronto for now

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

well i think it has to do w/ perception of what IS a korean and what is an american, and it is a touchy subject.

For immigrant countries (canada & US and to a lesser extent australia), what it means to be Canadian & American changes from generation to generation. Whereas in alot of the non immigrant countries like Korea/France/Germany what it means to be Korean/French/German has been etched in stone for centuries. In the 40's you'd be hard pressed to tell a white guy that blacks were equal Americans, but today blacks are seen as part of american culture. same w/ indian/asian/hispanic americans. They 'd all be considered americans today in most of the US, but 40 years ago very doubtful, regardless of their citizenship. Heck even caucasion italians were looked down upon when they first arrived in the US in the 20's, but today nobody would question how american a 3rd generation italian american would be.

Just because france/germany allow dual citizenship doesnt mean they consider you french/german. Tell that to the descendant of algerian/african immigrants in France or Turkish immigrants in Germany. When my friend was studying french in paris (from canada) they told his group of friends that the black guy with them couldnt enter the night club because he was "too black". My friend snapped and ended up arguing w/ the bouncers, but it just was'nt gonna happen even though the black guy in the group was born and raised in france and had french citizenship. This was in Paris, not some backwoods part of France.
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marlow



Joined: 06 Feb 2005

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Having second citizenship would not exclude being in the army. You'd have to follow two countries' rules, and still have to do the service. It's not an issue for females anyway.

Plus, Koreans can't just pick up citizenships at the local supermarket. So, allowing dual citizenship is not going to set off a shopping spree. As well, I think those who wanted to be a citizen elsewhere have probably done so.

Personally, I think their law is dumb. My sons don't have dual citizenship because I think Korea's "decide on one when you are eighteen" policy is stupid. I'd rather give them just Canadian and have them not have to bother with renouncing anything.
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