Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Korean Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

The Depression Thread
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 102, 103, 104 ... 107, 108, 109  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Current Events Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2013 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/9826857/Britain-is-experiencing-worse-slump-than-during-Great-Depression.html

Quote:
Britain is experiencing 'worse slump than during Great Depression'

Ministers today admitted Britain is facing "very, very grave difficulties" after figures showed the economy did not grow at all in 2012.

Both George Osborne, the Chancellor, and Danny Alexander, the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, said they do not underestimate the scale of the challenge but insisted the Goverment is on a "path of repairing our public finances".

Despite their optimism, City analysts warned that the economy is still "in crisis", more than four years after the financial crash of autumn 2008.

Economists from the Royal Bank of Scotland said the last four years have produced the worst economic performance in a non post-war period since records started being collected in the 1830s.


If it is worse than the Great Depression how can it be called a slump?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.mybudget360.com/pension-crisis-pensions-underfunded-americans-covered-by-pensions

I do not know how states are going to cover their pension costs. I do not know how cities will either. The population is invested (if they have anything) in terrible 401k's that Goldman et al periodically blow up and look.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-01-18/retirement-savings-accounts-draw-u-s-consumer-bureau-attention.html

Quote:
The U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is weighing whether it should take on a role in helping Americans manage the $19.4 trillion they have put into retirement savings, a move that would be the agency’s first foray into consumer investments.


What's the over/under these funds would be thrown into t-bills?

[/quote]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Kuros



Joined: 27 Apr 2004

PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 7:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A B.A. will get you a job as a file clerk

Consider a law firm.

Quote:
Like other employers across the country, the firm hires only people with a bachelor’s degree, even for jobs that do not require college-level skills.

This prerequisite applies to everyone, including the receptionist, paralegals, administrative assistants and file clerks.

Even the office “runner” — the in-house courier who, for $10 an hour, ferries documents back and forth between the courthouse and the office — went to a four-year school.

. . .

Economists have referred to this phenomenon as “degree inflation,” and it has been steadily infiltrating America’s job market. Across industries and geographic areas, many other jobs that didn’t used to require a diploma — positions like dental hygienists, cargo agents, clerks and claims adjusters — are increasingly requiring one, according to Burning Glass, a company that analyzes job ads from more than 20,000 online sources, including major job boards and small- to midsize-employer sites.

. . .

“I am over $100,000 in student loan debt right now,” said Megan Parker, who earns $37,000 as the firm’s receptionist. She graduated from the Art Institute of Atlanta in 2011 with a degree in fashion and retail management, and spent months waiting on “bridezillas” at a couture boutique, among other stores, while churning out office-job applications.


Allow Americans to bankrupt any debt. Stimulus is for assholes and Keynesians.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Art Institute of Atlanta is 50pc owned by Goldman.

There probably isn't much we can do to help someone who thought spending 100K at an art institute in Atlanta a good idea, less preventing her from having the freedom to make such stupid decisions in the first place. A fool and her future income are quickly parted. A debt jubilee is a good start, but she'll find another innovative way to blow up her life soon after. She's miserable because she's free. The knock off effect of her being free is that we're (meaning the non-spacecase community) going to have to clear her debts.

No, best go after the problem. Usury. I'm beating a dead horse.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2013 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.businessinsider.com/nouriel-roubini-turns-bullish-2013-2

Quote:
Of course, a financial asset bubble implies good news for stock prices, at least until it bursts.

"Off camera, Roubini sums up his analysis of all this as 'short-term bullish, long-term catastrophic,'" writes Task.

The bottom line for Roubini: "The outcome of it could be a credit bubble that's bigger than the one we had in 2007."


It's almost funny, right? Americans are completely powerless to stop it.

http://www.businessinsider.com/millennials-arent-who-you-think-they-are-2013-2

Quote:
Millennials Are Starting To Act Like The Great Depression Generation
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Fri Mar 08, 2013 7:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This Grillo fellow in Italy is on to something:

http://www.commondreams.org/view/2013/03/07-9?print
Quote:
• unilateral default on the public debt;
• nationalization of the banks; and
• a guaranteed “citizenship” income of 1000 euros a month.


Agree 100%.

Here comes the international campaign against him:

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4353870,00.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 6:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-03-12/hungary-threatens-to-take-over-foreign-banks-amid-clash-with-eu.html
Quote:
Hungary Wants to Curb Foreign Banks Amid EU Democracy Clash

Prime Minister Viktor Orban plans to curb foreign banks’ presence in Hungary, risking a deepening clash with the European Union and lifting the cost of insuring the country’s bonds against default to a five-month high.

Hungary seeks to lift local bank-industry ownership to at least 50 percent, Orban said today in Budapest. Intesa Sanpaolo SpA (ISP) may cut its presence, CEO Enrico Tommaso Cuchicani said today, calling Hungary a “nightmare,” while Danske Bank (DANSKE) A/S said the move is “in effect threatening to nationalize” part of the industry. Erste Group Bank AG (EBS), KBC Groep NV (KBC), Raiffeisen Bank International AG (RBI), UniCredit SpA (UNIP), Bayerische Landesbank and Citigroup Inc. (C) are among those also active in Hungary.

The proposal threatens to widen the rift between the EU’s most-indebted eastern state and the rest of the 27-nation bloc over changes to the constitution Hungarian lawmakers passed yesterday that limit court independence. Investors have sold the forint this month on concern the central bank will lower interest rates more after Orban appointed Gyorgy Matolcsy to lead the institution in a push to overhaul policy making amid a deepening recession.

“If the Hungarian government and the new central bank leadership continue to pursue such a highly unorthodox policy, there is a serious risk of a major market meltdown,” analysts at Danske Bank led by Lars Christensen said in the note. “We find it difficult to see how the Hungarian government will fund itself on international capital markets if the government and the central bank don’t move very soon to calm market fears.”

The European Commission would seek to force Hungary to modify the constitutional amendments if a review shows that they violate European norms and values, Olivier Bailly, a spokesman for the EU’s executive, told reporters today in Brussels.

“It’s an unhealthy situation that foreigners have such a high degree of ownership in Hungary’s banking system,” Orban said today. “While respecting international treaties and relevant economic norms, we must strive to increase the Hungarian ownership ratio within the Hungarian banking system. The government has a target number -- we would like at least 50 percent of the Hungarian banking system to be in Hungarian hands.”

..

Worsening perceptions of creditworthiness lifted the cost of credit default swaps protecting Hungary’s debt by 21 basis points to 341, the biggest jump in 14 months and the highest level in five months. The swaps pay the buyer face value in exchange for the underlying securities or the cash equivalent should an issuer fail to adhere to its debt agreements.

The “contentious changes to the constitution overshadow relations between the country and Germany and the EU,” the German government said in a statement today.

...

The government may use Takarekbank, a network of savings cooperatives, the post office and other state organizations to build a network which can help ease the country’s funding shortage “on a national level,” Orban said.

Hungarian stocks fell, led by a 2.1 percent drop in OTP. Mortgage provider FHB Jelzalogbank Nyrt. slid 1.2 percent to its lowest close this year.

“Orban wants to force foreign banks out of the country, but this is a democracy and free market, which means it is not acceptable,” John Milton, director of Ipopema Securities SA (IPE)’s unit in Budapest, wrote in e-mailed comments today.


Hungary just changed her constitution in an attempt to further the de-communize the nation. The internationalist media is in attack mode.

I liked this line:
Quote:
Orban wants to force foreign banks out of the country, but this is a democracy and free market, which means it is not acceptable


Then I guess we know what the problems are.

xxxxxxxx

http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/beppe-grillo-on-the-money-system-stand-up-show-1998.html

This guy knows his economics. He has seen through the scam. It is exciting that he's found popularity in Italy.

xxxxxxxxx

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-fdic-settlements-20130311,0,3871291.story

Quote:
Three years ago, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. collected $54 million from Deutsche Bank in a settlement over unsound loans that contributed to a spectacular California bank failure.

The deal might have made big headlines, given that the bad loans contributed to the largest payout in FDIC history, $13 billion. But the government cut a deal with the bank's lawyers to keep it quiet: a "no press release" clause that required the FDIC never to mention the deal "except in response to a specific inquiry."

The FDIC has handled scores of settlements the same way since the mortgage meltdown, a major policy shift from previous crises, when the FDIC trumpeted punitive actions against banks as a deterrent to others.


Governance in the modern world is little more than an elaborate public relations campaign for oligarchs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 6:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-16/europe-does-it-again-cyprus-depositor-haircut-bailout-turns-saver-panic-bank-runs-br
Quote:

Late last night, after markets closed for the weekend, following an extended discussion the European finance ministers announced their "bailout" solution for Russian oligarch depositor-haven Cyprus: a €13 billion bailout (Europe's fifth) with a huge twist: the implementation of what has been the biggest taboo in European bailouts to date - the impairment of depositors, and a fresh, full blown escalation in the status quo's war against savers everywhere.

Specifically, Cyprus will impose a levy of 6.75% on deposits of less than €100,000 - the ceiling for European Union account insurance, which is now effectively gone following this case study - and 9.9% above that. The measures will raise €5.8 billion, Dutch Finance Minister Jeroen Dijsselbloem, who leads the group of euro-area ministers, said.


Bankers win again. They get 6.75 to 9.9% of all deposits in the country. That would piss me off.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
slothrop



Joined: 03 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 6:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

edit

Last edited by slothrop on Mon Jun 10, 2013 7:18 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

slothrop wrote:
i heard(read)they were trying to get 40%.
at this point, there is no turning back for the banksters, unelected leaders of the european union, or the elected(and in some cases unelected)leaders of the countries within the eurozone. for any of them to lose their position atop the food chain now would likely result in being tried for treason, fraud, and in some cases crimes against humanity. that is, if they ever made it to the courthouse. they may end up being dragged through the streets like mussolini.


The pressure put on the societies in intense. Should any thought towards leaving the EU or that the EU is in and of itself corrupt is met with intense media shaming. If a Hungarian pol wants to clean up the central bank (as is being done in Hungary) the international media, with total and perfect homogeneity, starts trotting out the references to WW2.

70% of Spaniards want to remain in the Euro, despite 24% unemployment, and this is entirely the result of decades of relentless guilt-tripping propaganda.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 7:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For example:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/sns-rt-us-hungary-centralbankbre92d0v1-20130314,0,5679721.story

Quote:
Hungary's central bank reels from sweeping takeover


Reels from sweeping takeover.

How can a bank "reel". And a "takeover" from whom, to whom?

Quote:
BUDAPEST (Reuters) - The biggest meeting room at the National Bank of Hungary, once a sanctuary for academic debate between the bank's experts and leaders, is now the preserve of one of new Governor Gyorgy Matolcsy's closest aides.


"A sanctuary for academic debate" means "internationalist agents of usury" conspiring to loot the country.

Quote:
The change of use is symbolic of a sweeping takeover during which some of the bank's most respected economists were dismissed within less than a week, several sources at the bank told Reuters on condition of anonymity.


What the economists were doing was not working so they were fired. By the time Reuters gets it these become "the bank's most respected economists". According to whom? The people who are looting earth? Respected by whom?

Quote:
Investors expressed concern about the bank's independence with the appointment of Matolcsy, a close associate of Prime Minister Viktor Orban who has been accused by the European Union and United States of undermining Hungary's young democracy.


Ah, there we go. Investors. Investors are worried the bank will be independent of them and subordinate to the government.

The "young democracy" part is thrown in to diminish the validity of the agency of the Hungarian people. They're inexperienced with democracy.. These are just growing pains.

Quote:
The new governor, who hiked taxes on banks and key sectors and nationalized private pension assets in his previous role as economy minister, is only in his second week in the job.


Hiked taxes on banks? Go on.

Quote:
He has not yet outlined what the bank will do, although he says he is considering new tools to help the sickly economy. The bank says the dismissals were designed to keep a lid on costs and there were other rooms where debates could be held.

But his early decisions about how the bank itself will run suggest Matolcsy does not want an organization that will question his plans, a concern for investors who believe the central bank should be a brake on any government policies that could weaken the currency.


In other words, if you use the national currency for national growth, the "investors" (foreign banks) will conspire against your currency.

Quote:
During a process which the sources described as "surreal" and "brutally arrogant", newcomers strode the bank's corridors and took pictures of rooms where employees were sitting without giving them any information.

"What you can feel now is a sense of uncertainty which makes people feel intimidated," one of the sources said.


Surreal, brutally arrogant, uncertainty, intimidated.

What sources? Who are they? What is their track record?

...

Quote:
The changes signal that the professional culture within the bank, which has made it the top workshop for economic analysis in Hungary, could change markedly, sources at the bank said.

The main risk is that the bank's operation could become less transparent, with less professional dialogue and independent thinking within the bank's thick walls.


The professional culture would change in the sense that the pricks running the bank for Goldman et al will be fired.

The "main risk" is transparency? Central banks are more secretive than the CIA. All of them. By "transparency" they mean: "we wont be fed insider information".

Quote:
"There's been a culture of debate within the bank, anybody could say Mr. Governor you are wrong. Nobody was afraid to express their views even if those contradicted those of the governor or his deputies," one of the sources said.


BS.

Quote:
Among the first asked to leave within days of Matolcsy's arrival were Aron Gereben, the head of financial analysis and the bank's chief economist Agnes Csermely.

Peter Benczur, the head of research department, was also dismissed, the bank said. He was regarded as one of the top brains at the bank with a Ph.D in economics from the Massachussetts Institute of Technology and had worked at the bank since 2001.

xxx

Matolcsy demoted two of the deputy governors, Julia Kiraly and Ferenc Karvalits, who were appointed under a previous government and might oppose monetary expansion.

The third vice governor, Matolcsy's right-hand man Adam Balog, saw his role enhanced greatly.


Firing an MIT economist. Bernanke is from MIT. Grand idea.

xxx

Quote:
"We will see a dramatic scaling back of research being published and no criticism of the government," he said. "The key risk is that policy changes are slipped out under the radar ... as we go down the road of unorthodoxy."


The "down the road of unorthodoxy" is the key phrase in the whole article. Orthodox economics is neo-liberal, screw the people, crap. Hungary is working to free itself from the banksters.

The internationalist media is awful. It uses emotional triggers, lies, loose references to history to keep the globe in line. It's really effective. Hungary is going to become a pariah. All the American covers for usury (Open Society, NED, Democrat and Republican institutes) will be pouring money in there to create a "color revolution". Before you know it, the idiot liberals in your company will be "supporting the feminist resistance" in Hungary, as they do with P.Riot in Russia. The whole thing is a sick joke.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
slothrop



Joined: 03 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 7:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

edit

Last edited by slothrop on Sun Mar 17, 2013 7:19 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Titus



Joined: 19 May 2012

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I googled Hungary and Orban:

Hungary's Orban defies foreign criticism over laws

Hungary's Orban stages assault against democracy

Hungarian premier Orban rejects constitutional criticism

Hungary's new constitution: Time to sanction Orbán?

Constitution changes no threat to democracy, says Hungary PM

Hungarian Leader Takes Right-wing Defiance to Brussels

Viktor Orbán's Hungarian power grab

Viktor Orban's Dismantling of Hungarian Democracy

etc.

The issue is that Hungary won't allow foreign banks to have majority control over Hungarian banks. That's #1.

Secondary to this, is that the new constitution lowers the retirement age for judges. This is an attempt to clear the judiciary of the communist and socialist appointed judges. Solid idea.

Thirdly, the judges are now only allowed to rule on "procedural grounds", meaning they can't legislate from the bench (subvert the deliberative process). Legislating from the bench is the preferred method of leftists (who are servants of internationalist usury, if they know it or not) to "move the country forward" etc. See Canada for this. A law is passed, the judge upends it and the media refers to the new law created by the judge as "the law". etc.

The next big bug up the oligarchy ass is the media law. Yes, Hungary is going after international banks and the media.

http://www.hrw.org/news/2012/07/02/hungary-failings-media-warrant-eu-action
Quote:
Ongoing problems with Hungary’s media laws include a politicized appointments process for the Media Council, the main media regulator, evidenced by the direct appointment of its president by the prime minister and the nine-year tenure of its members, which can only be ended by a supermajority of parliament. Further concerns include the requirement for “balanced” reporting, which in practice has a chilling effect on investigative journalism and leads to self-censorship.


It's no problem if the appointments are politicized. That's how it works all over Europe. The difference here is that Hungary has a right wing government, and the only potential opposition to the ruling party is an actual fascist political party, so it's clear that all future appointments will be right wing. The goal is international control over the media and not sanctity of process.

We're going to be hearing a lot about Hungary in the new few years. And the majority of you (all, maybe less GF and potentially Fox) will be fooled by it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Fox



Joined: 04 Mar 2009

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Titus wrote:
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-16/europe-does-it-again-cyprus-depositor-haircut-bailout-turns-saver-panic-bank-runs-br
Quote:

Late last night, after markets closed for the weekend, following an extended discussion the European finance ministers announced their "bailout" solution for Russian oligarch depositor-haven Cyprus: a €13 billion bailout (Europe's fifth) with a huge twist: the implementation of what has been the biggest taboo in European bailouts to date - the impairment of depositors, and a fresh, full blown escalation in the status quo's war against savers everywhere.

Specifically, Cyprus will impose a levy of 6.75% on deposits of less than €100,000 - the ceiling for European Union account insurance, which is now effectively gone following this case study - and 9.9% above that. The measures will raise €5.8 billion, Dutch Finance Minister Jeroen Dijsselbloem, who leads the group of euro-area ministers, said.


Bankers win again. They get 6.75 to 9.9% of all deposits in the country. That would piss me off.


Sounds like things might end up going a little bit better for low-amount depositors than that:

Quote:
Update: There is a plan to revise the deposit tax, from Matina Stevis "Exclusive: plans to revise #cyprus deposit tax on wires: under 5% for €0-100k, under 10% for €100-500k, around 13% for €500k+"
Read more at http://www.calculatedriskblog.com/2013/03/cyprus-update.html#hhsSF6HYyELSHQBo.99


I'd still be outraged if I was told, "Hey, we're going to take 5% of your guaranteed bank deposits, because if we don't, the bank would crash and our deposit protection scheme can't afford to actually work." Here's the thing, though: Cyprus was able to be bullied into accepting this because they don't control their own currency. They literally, physically cannot fulfill their deposit-insurance obligations so long as they operate on the Euro. The Euro is worse than the gold standard ever was; at least a nation operating on the gold standard could hypothetically find and dig up some more gold, but the Euro is completely controlled by what is probably best characterized as a hostile party.

Cyprus needs to bail on the Euro. So does Greece. So does Italy (who is already being sized up for a not dissimilar sort of bullying).

Quote:
While some argue that Cyprus was "one of the biggest money-washing machines for Russian criminals," and others that Cyprus ex-Pat community and energy resources brough deposits (not to say their high deposit interest rates), it seems the European Union (IMF et al.) have decided that the route to crisis stabilization, just as we outlined here over a year ago and updated here, is through a wealth tax.

However, as Handelsblatt reports, the gross distortions of wealth distribution among both core and peripheral nations (evident in the chasm between 'mean' and 'median' net assets - or wealth) makes some nations more 'capable' of 'giving' and as Commerzbank's chief economist notes, median wealth in Italy is EUR164,000 (as opposed to Austria's median of around EUR76,000 and mean of around EUR265,000) meaning that in theory Italy has no debt crisis (with net assets at 173% of GDP) - significantly more than the Germans at 124% - "so it would make sense, in Italy a one-time property tax levy," he suggested.

"A tax rate of 15% on financial assets would probably be enough to push the Italian government debt to below the critical level of 100% of gross domestic product." So there you have it, the 'new deal' in Europe, as we warned, is 'wealth taxes' and testing the "capacity of Cypriots" appears to be the strawman on what the public will take before social unrest becomes intolerable.


I'm not even against wealth taxes in principle. The problem here isn't taxation, it's what those taxes are being used for. In this case, they're being used to transfer said wealth to societal parasites.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Kuros



Joined: 27 Apr 2004

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 5:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Titus wrote:

Thirdly, the judges are now only allowed to rule on "procedural grounds", meaning they can't legislate from the bench (subvert the deliberative process). Legislating from the bench is the preferred method of leftists (who are servants of internationalist usury, if they know it or not) to "move the country forward" etc. See Canada for this. A law is passed, the judge upends it and the media refers to the new law created by the judge as "the law". etc.


The Hungarian Fourth Amendment guts judicial review.

Hungary Steps Away From European Democracy

Quote:
Among the most controversial aspects of the reform are severe limitations on the power of the constitutional court. The court will now be allowed to review the constitution or amendments to it based only on formal procedural aspects, not on their actual content. Additionally, all the court's decisions prior to the date when the country's new constitution came into force in 2012 are to be invalidated, essentially eliminating precedence.

Freedom of expression is also to be limited when it damages the broadly defined "dignity of the Hungarian nation." Students will be required to stay and work in Hungary for a certain time after finishing a university degree, or else pay tuition fees -- a measure meant to curb the emigration of highly-educated workers and academics.


An independent judiciary is a cornerstone of the modern democratic system. Under the Fourth Amendment, one-fourth of the Parliament must request judicial review of a law before the judiciary may act. Watch as Viktor Orban's right-wing bloc attempts to gradually make that impossible with various procedural barriers.

But first the EU High Court will step in and overturn this constitutional amendment.

Hungary is not Iceland, people.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Current Events Forum All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 102, 103, 104 ... 107, 108, 109  Next
Page 103 of 109

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2013 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International