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Revised homeward-bound thread
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morrisonhotel



Joined: 18 Jul 2009
Location: Gyeonggi-do

PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2011 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PatrickGHBusan wrote:
morrisonhotel wrote:
Has anyone left Korea and gone straight in to NGO/government work back home? That's what I'm aiming to do and would like to hear how you wrote about your experience on your CV.


I did.

PM me if you want details.

However, my situation was not all that common.


Will do. Thanks.
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pedrotaves



Joined: 02 Mar 2011

PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 6:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the same vein as the question about government/NGO work, does anyone have experience going from Korea to an International Relations-ish graduate program in the States?

I'd like to know how much a factor it plays--if at all--in the admissions process. I'll have spent a year in Korea by the time I would enroll for school.
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morrisonhotel



Joined: 18 Jul 2009
Location: Gyeonggi-do

PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pedrotaves wrote:
In the same vein as the question about government/NGO work, does anyone have experience going from Korea to an International Relations-ish graduate program in the States?

I'd like to know how much a factor it plays--if at all--in the admissions process. I'll have spent a year in Korea by the time I would enroll for school.


Same question from me but for Europe instead of the US.
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Adventurer



Joined: 28 Jan 2006

PostPosted: Sat Sep 10, 2011 5:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pedrotaves wrote:
In the same vein as the question about government/NGO work, does anyone have experience going from Korea to an International Relations-ish graduate program in the States?

I'd like to know how much a factor it plays--if at all--in the admissions process. I'll have spent a year in Korea by the time I would enroll for school.


Did you learn much Korean? I did apply to graduate school and became a teaching assistant while I got my M.A. in TESOL. However, I spoke three languages, so I was considered useful. It depends on your grades and what you know. Simply just teaching English in Korea on its own doesn't cut it, is my guess.
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Konglishman



Joined: 14 Sep 2007
Location: Nanjing

PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2011 1:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am actually now planning to go back to graduate school next year in the US either in Fall 2012 or in Spring 2013. It is going to be hard to leave Korea.
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Captain Corea



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2011 4:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Two links about starting up Health Care in Canada (after living abroad).

General
Quote:
Waiting for health insurance coverage to begin

Depending on which province or territory you decide to make your new home, you may have to wait a period of time before you are eligible for public health insurance. During this time, you should apply for temporary private health insurance coverage.

Private insurance companies are listed in the yellow pages of the telephone book, usually under Insurance. You must buy this private insurance within five days of arriving in your province or territory or insurance companies may not provide coverage for you.

Refugee claimants who cannot afford private health insurance and refugee claimants living in provinces that have a three-month waiting period can receive emergency and essential health services at no cost. The cost for these services is covered by the Interim Federal Health Program.


And specific for what I may be more interested in...
Quote:
You are not covered for medical services under the AHCIP until all the required information is received and your application is processed. However, any medical services you receive and pay for before your application is processed, may be reimbursed once you have your personal health card, and can show eligibility for the period when you received the services.
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chicken_shake



Joined: 01 Mar 2011

PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2012 5:32 am    Post subject: taxable income Reply with quote

I hope this is a good place for this question...

My inquiries are directed for those of you who have been in Korea for a few years or so and managed to save a sizable chunk of money.

When you take this money back to America, have you had any IRS tax-related problems, considering this is income earned in a foreign country. How did you go about handling these matters?

-did you just transfer it from your bank in Korea to your bank in the states?
-did you line your suitcases with 10's of thousands of dollars?!
-how were you (or were you even) reporting your income in Korea over the years when filing taxes in the US?

If I have over $100,000 in savings, how do I bring it back to the States???

Thanks all!
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PatrickGHBusan



Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Location: Busan (1997-2008) Canada 2008 -

PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2012 12:13 pm    Post subject: Re: taxable income Reply with quote

chicken_shake wrote:
I hope this is a good place for this question...

My inquiries are directed for those of you who have been in Korea for a few years or so and managed to save a sizable chunk of money.

When you take this money back to America, have you had any IRS tax-related problems, considering this is income earned in a foreign country. How did you go about handling these matters?

-did you just transfer it from your bank in Korea to your bank in the states?
-did you line your suitcases with 10's of thousands of dollars?!
-how were you (or were you even) reporting your income in Korea over the years when filing taxes in the US?

If I have over $100,000 in savings, how do I bring it back to the States???

Thanks all!


Check the tax laws before you do anything. That can mean talking to a specialist. You can always visit the Government website and search for tax related issues that mirror your situation. I would say that you NEED to do this before doing anything else.

You may have to pay some income taxes or you may not...its best to get a straight answer from someone who actual has the facts on this.

Good luck.
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cincynate



Joined: 07 Jul 2009
Location: Jeju-do, South Korea

PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't line your suitcase with 10's of thousands of dollars. The maximum you are allowed to walk into the US with is $10,000. If you have more, they will confiscate it whether it is legitimate or not.

You should have been reporting your income over the years on your yearly tax return. Anything under $80,000 earned abroad is tax free, so you wouldn't pay any tax on it. If you make a sizable transfer to a US bank account, (say $100,000), the bank will report the transfer to the IRS, but you would have your previous tax returns to prove the income was reported. Easy as that.

If you have not been filing tax returns, then you need to talk to a tax attorney before transferring ANY money home. Thanks to the PATRIOT act, the government monitors incoming and outgoing wire transfers more closely and a $100,000 transfer will through up red flags, especially if you haven't filed a tax return in the past 5 years.

Good luck!
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NilesQ



Joined: 27 Nov 2006

PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For any Canadians heading home, take some of your money and take a trade at a community college in Alberta. If you are even an apprentice Welder, Pipefitter, Heavy Equipment Mechanic or Operator, etc you quite reasonably expect to earn up to $100,000 per year. Best way is to get a camp job where you fly in and fly out and live in an area with a lower cost of living.

There are lots of jobs out there, you just need to get training that is directed at a specific job. Blue collar work is where the money is in Canada's oil economy right now. Choose carefully and your skilled trade will be transferable to many industries. With the right situation, skilled trade work will allow you to work half the year and still travel or do whatever else you enjoy the rest of the time.
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No_hite_pls



Joined: 05 Mar 2007
Location: Don't hate me because I'm right

PostPosted: Mon May 20, 2013 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cincynate wrote:
Don't line your suitcase with 10's of thousands of dollars. The maximum you are allowed to walk into the US with is $10,000. If you have more, they will confiscate it whether it is legitimate or not.


If you tell the customs agents that you have over 10,000 USD and you explain why they will sign a form. You can have more than 10,000 in cash you just have claim it. They do not confiscate it.
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BackRow



Joined: 28 Jul 2010

PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm starting to worry about settling in back in canada. I plan to relocate to toronto when I'm done here in another year or two and while I'll have atleast 30k in the bank and good credit I wont have a job or rental history to help me rent an apartment

how have others worked through situations similar to this?
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ttompatz



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Location: Kwangju, South Korea

PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BackRow wrote:
I'm starting to worry about settling in back in canada. I plan to relocate to toronto when I'm done here in another year or two and while I'll have atleast 30k in the bank and good credit I wont have a job or rental history to help me rent an apartment

how have others worked through situations similar to this?


Just explain where you were, show a copy of your ARC and you have your passport with stamps abroad to back it all up.

.
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bbud656



Joined: 15 Jun 2010

PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2014 5:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was in Korea from 2010-2014, roughly 3.5 years teaching in elementary school and kindergarten mostly. I loved living in Korea, but the reason I had to leave was because I didnt see many opportunities there to advance in a career (Visa requirements, protectionist laws, chaebol mafia, etc.). I had just turned 28 and I felt my resume was taking a massive hit outside of the teaching field.

I had quite a bit of vacation due to an affiliation with my school and a university. I met a lot of interesting people on vacation and stayed in touch with many of them. 6 months before I decided to leave Korea I started a company with a friend from home and one of the people I became friends with on my travels. About a month before I was to head home, another friend I had met networking in Asia invited me to intern at a branch office of a global company in China. After working there for 3 months I found an opportunity to start my own company in China. Now I study Chinese in the morning, intern in the afternoon, and work on running 2 companies that have my name listed as the owner (50 % and 51%). I wouldn't call myself successful. The companies I am involved in haven't proven themselves fully. But what I learned and am learning being an entrepreneur in two countries is invaluable. Really, all I wanted out of this experience was something to boost my resume to make up for all the fun I had for the last 4 years teaching and backpacking in Asia. I have no idea how it will all turn out, but I'm glad I took the chances I did.

My biggest piece of advice would be to network, network, network! If you are feeling frustrated or trapped in Korea, you aren't alone. For foreigners, Korea is not a place filled with opportunities outside of the teaching profession. If that isn't your passion, I suggest you go somewhere else.
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