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Letter from Revenue Canada
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itiswhatitis



Joined: 08 Aug 2011

PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 10:15 pm    Post subject: Letter from Revenue Canada Reply with quote

My parents got a letter from Revenue Canada today saying that I should file a 2012 tax return within 30 days.

Weird since I have not been back for a visit since 2010 and I have been working in Korea since 2007.

I have not filed since 2007.

As an aside, I have not lived at my parents home since 2001 so it is strange that the mail is even coming there.

The non residency form is not a requirment for Canadian. I've been wanred by other expats that I ought to tell Revenue Canada only what they need to know and that offering information may only put me on their radar screen.

I'm thinking to ignore the letter. I plan on living abroad for 4 more years and I own no assests and have virtually no ties to Canada (except being a citizen).

Anyone else got a letter like this?

Am I best to ignore?

Thanks in advance.
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Weigookin74



Joined: 26 Oct 2009

PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 11:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did you tell them you were a non resident? I declared to them I was a non resident back in 2007. I filed taxes for the 2006 year as I spent part of it in Canada. I wrote a letter to go with the income tax form I filled out telling them I was living in Korea and was a non resident of Canada. They sent a letter back acknowledging me as a non resident. Some Canadians in the past had a hard time being declared a non resident. A non resident doesn't have to pay taxes.

If you got a letter telling them you were a non resident, you should be covered. If not, you may have to file.

Recently, I met a dude who did some temp work for Revenue Canada and he was saying that we are suppose to file returns even if not being a resident of Canada. No taxes to be paid. But, since they haven't sent a letter to any addresses in Canada, I'll let sleeping dogs lie. Maybe I'll contact them in a couple of years to make sure. This guy tried to tell me a small penalty might be charged for not filing. But, who knows if it's true or hearsay?

Let's hope it's not some crack down and that this is a case of you just not communicating your intentions with Revenue Canada. Thankfully Revenue Canada is nothing like the American IRS.
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Stan Rogers



Joined: 20 Aug 2010

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 12:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe its identity theft. Sombody there could be pretending to be you.
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Who's Your Daddy?



Joined: 30 May 2010
Location: The joy's in the ride.

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 1:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wouldn't just ignore it. I'd respond with a letter saying you live in South Korea and have been a resident here since 200X, and are paying taxing as a South Korean resident.
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PEIGUY



Joined: 28 Mar 2004
Location: Omokgyo

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 3:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Weigookin74 wrote:
Did you tell them you were a non resident? I declared to them I was a non resident back in 2007. I filed taxes for the 2006 year as I spent part of it in Canada. I wrote a letter to go with the income tax form I filled out telling them I was living in Korea and was a non resident of Canada. They sent a letter back acknowledging me as a non resident. Some Canadians in the past had a hard time being declared a non resident. A non resident doesn't have to pay taxes.

If you got a letter telling them you were a non resident, you should be covered. If not, you may have to file.

Recently, I met a dude who did some temp work for Revenue Canada and he was saying that we are suppose to file returns even if not being a resident of Canada. No taxes to be paid. But, since they haven't sent a letter to any addresses in Canada, I'll let sleeping dogs lie. Maybe I'll contact them in a couple of years to make sure. This guy tried to tell me a small penalty might be charged for not filing. But, who knows if it's true or hearsay?

Let's hope it's not some crack down and that this is a case of you just not communicating your intentions with Revenue Canada. Thankfully Revenue Canada is nothing like the American IRS.


This is the right thing to do. I did the same thing (twice) as I went back to school after 4 years in Korea. Both times I paid taxes on the income I made in Canada and told them that I would be a non resident for tax purposes when it came time to file.
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Wildbore



Joined: 17 Jun 2009

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Got many of those. Report your income at whatever the *beep* you want, and pocket the GST cheques (about 1000 bucks itself) and Working income credit, which is about another 1000 bucks a year.

Been doing it for several years now and have been laughing my way to the bank, keeping my provincial health insurance (and using the *beep* out of it on my vacations), while at the same time paying no Canadian taxes and getting a *beep* load of REFUNDABLE tax refunds.

Payments to NHIC (Korean national health) are tax deductable, and payments to Korean income tax are a credit.

Those who "claim" non residency in Korea are just dumb in most cases as ESL teachers are concerned. You can get a lot more from Canada, unless you are in a high-income bracket, if you just file with your permanent resident address in Canada.

Just file with your normal credits, deductions, and benefits and you will pocket a lot. Quite easy but ESL teachers are usually just dumb ignorant people to begin with.
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wanderkind



Joined: 01 Jan 2012
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 4:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wildbore wrote:
Got many of those. Report your income at whatever the *beep* you want, and pocket the GST cheques (about 1000 bucks itself) and Working income credit, which is about another 1000 bucks a year.

Been doing it for several years now and have been laughing my way to the bank, keeping my provincial health insurance (and using the *beep* out of it on my vacations), while at the same time paying no Canadian taxes and getting a *beep* load of REFUNDABLE tax refunds.

Payments to NHIC (Korean national health) are tax deductable, and payments to Korean income tax are a credit.

Those who "claim" non residency in Korea are just dumb in most cases as ESL teachers are concerned. You can get a lot more from Canada, unless you are in a high-income bracket, if you just file with your permanent resident address in Canada.

Just file with your normal credits, deductions, and benefits and you will pocket a lot. Quite easy but ESL teachers are usually just dumb ignorant people to begin with.


How do you retain your provincial health insurance? Mine was cancelled on me after I'd been out of the country for 16 months or something along those lines, and I was told I can't get it back until I've lived in Canada for 3 months again... (and proved such by providing rent and bill docs).

Do you own a house and rent it out to someone maybe?
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jvalmer



Joined: 06 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 5:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

wanderkind wrote:
Wildbore wrote:
Got many of those. Report your income at whatever the *beep* you want, and pocket the GST cheques (about 1000 bucks itself) and Working income credit, which is about another 1000 bucks a year.

Been doing it for several years now and have been laughing my way to the bank, keeping my provincial health insurance (and using the *beep* out of it on my vacations), while at the same time paying no Canadian taxes and getting a *beep* load of REFUNDABLE tax refunds.

Payments to NHIC (Korean national health) are tax deductable, and payments to Korean income tax are a credit.

Those who "claim" non residency in Korea are just dumb in most cases as ESL teachers are concerned. You can get a lot more from Canada, unless you are in a high-income bracket, if you just file with your permanent resident address in Canada.

Just file with your normal credits, deductions, and benefits and you will pocket a lot. Quite easy but ESL teachers are usually just dumb ignorant people to begin with.


How do you retain your provincial health insurance? Mine was cancelled on me after I'd been out of the country for 16 months or something along those lines, and I was told I can't get it back until I've lived in Canada for 3 months again... (and proved such by providing rent and bill docs).

Do you own a house and rent it out to someone maybe?

Just file your taxes every year. Put down a token income amount in the range of a few thousand bucks. But unlike the above poster, I only get the GST checks in the range or $65 every 3 months.
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Wildbore



Joined: 17 Jun 2009

PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

wanderkind wrote:
Wildbore wrote:
Got many of those. Report your income at whatever the *beep* you want, and pocket the GST cheques (about 1000 bucks itself) and Working income credit, which is about another 1000 bucks a year.

Been doing it for several years now and have been laughing my way to the bank, keeping my provincial health insurance (and using the *beep* out of it on my vacations), while at the same time paying no Canadian taxes and getting a *beep* load of REFUNDABLE tax refunds.

Payments to NHIC (Korean national health) are tax deductable, and payments to Korean income tax are a credit.

Those who "claim" non residency in Korea are just dumb in most cases as ESL teachers are concerned. You can get a lot more from Canada, unless you are in a high-income bracket, if you just file with your permanent resident address in Canada.

Just file with your normal credits, deductions, and benefits and you will pocket a lot. Quite easy but ESL teachers are usually just dumb ignorant people to begin with.


How do you retain your provincial health insurance? Mine was cancelled on me after I'd been out of the country for 16 months or something along those lines, and I was told I can't get it back until I've lived in Canada for 3 months again... (and proved such by providing rent and bill docs).

Do you own a house and rent it out to someone maybe?


Quite easy to just use your parents address. Unlike many countries, Canada doesn't keep records of when citizens enter and leave the country, and even if they started, the provinces (that run the health system) would not have automatic access to that info.

So if you establish residency abroad, the province has no clue unless you volunteer to fill out the change of address form.
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wings



Joined: 09 Nov 2006

PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Got many of those. Report your income at whatever the *beep* you want, and pocket the GST cheques (about 1000 bucks itself) and Working income credit, which is about another 1000 bucks a year.

Been doing it for several years now and have been laughing my way to the bank, keeping my provincial health insurance (and using the *beep* out of it on my vacations), while at the same time paying no Canadian taxes and getting a *beep* load of REFUNDABLE tax refunds.

Payments to NHIC (Korean national health) are tax deductable, and payments to Korean income tax are a credit.

Those who "claim" non residency in Korea are just dumb in most cases as ESL teachers are concerned. You can get a lot more from Canada, unless you are in a high-income bracket, if you just file with your permanent resident address in Canada.

Just file with your normal credits, deductions, and benefits and you will pocket a lot. Quite easy but ESL teachers are usually just dumb ignorant people to begin with.


A friend of mine did this (not a friend of a friend, a person I know very well). She got audited and had to pay the government of Canada a lot of money. This was in 2010. She went back to Canada to do a master's and ended up having to hand over all of her savings from her time in Korea, plus borrow from her parents to pay all the tax. The odds are it won't happen, but if it does it is a bitch.
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Wildbore



Joined: 17 Jun 2009

PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 2:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

wings wrote:
Quote:
Got many of those. Report your income at whatever the *beep* you want, and pocket the GST cheques (about 1000 bucks itself) and Working income credit, which is about another 1000 bucks a year.

Been doing it for several years now and have been laughing my way to the bank, keeping my provincial health insurance (and using the *beep* out of it on my vacations), while at the same time paying no Canadian taxes and getting a *beep* load of REFUNDABLE tax refunds.

Payments to NHIC (Korean national health) are tax deductable, and payments to Korean income tax are a credit.

Those who "claim" non residency in Korea are just dumb in most cases as ESL teachers are concerned. You can get a lot more from Canada, unless you are in a high-income bracket, if you just file with your permanent resident address in Canada.

Just file with your normal credits, deductions, and benefits and you will pocket a lot. Quite easy but ESL teachers are usually just dumb ignorant people to begin with.


A friend of mine did this (not a friend of a friend, a person I know very well). She got audited and had to pay the government of Canada a lot of money. This was in 2010. She went back to Canada to do a master's and ended up having to hand over all of her savings from her time in Korea, plus borrow from her parents to pay all the tax. The odds are it won't happen, but if it does it is a bitch.


Not a problem if you get letters from your employer verifying the amount made (even if its under-reported). Korean bosses do this all the time in Korea and will have no problem writing you said letter for whatever reason you may need it for.

CRA will accept an employer letter, on official letter head, as proof of income earned. Again, your friend just didn't have her ducks in a row.
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Rockhard



Joined: 11 Dec 2013

PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 4:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wildbore wrote:
wings wrote:
Quote:
Got many of those. Report your income at whatever the *beep* you want, and pocket the GST cheques (about 1000 bucks itself) and Working income credit, which is about another 1000 bucks a year.

Been doing it for several years now and have been laughing my way to the bank, keeping my provincial health insurance (and using the *beep* out of it on my vacations), while at the same time paying no Canadian taxes and getting a *beep* load of REFUNDABLE tax refunds.

Payments to NHIC (Korean national health) are tax deductable, and payments to Korean income tax are a credit.

Those who "claim" non residency in Korea are just dumb in most cases as ESL teachers are concerned. You can get a lot more from Canada, unless you are in a high-income bracket, if you just file with your permanent resident address in Canada.

Just file with your normal credits, deductions, and benefits and you will pocket a lot. Quite easy but ESL teachers are usually just dumb ignorant people to begin with.


A friend of mine did this (not a friend of a friend, a person I know very well). She got audited and had to pay the government of Canada a lot of money. This was in 2010. She went back to Canada to do a master's and ended up having to hand over all of her savings from her time in Korea, plus borrow from her parents to pay all the tax. The odds are it won't happen, but if it does it is a bitch.


Not a problem if you get letters from your employer verifying the amount made (even if its under-reported). Korean bosses do this all the time in Korea and will have no problem writing you said letter for whatever reason you may need it for.

CRA will accept an employer letter, on official letter head, as proof of income earned. Again, your friend just didn't have her ducks in a row.


You are going to get busted so bad. First, they'll find out you weren't really a resident for all these years and force you to pay back all that HST money. Or, they'll accept you were a resident and find out you lied about your income and fine you for tax evasion. Enjoy it while it lasts but eventually your file will come across someone's desk and they will nab you.
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Rockhard



Joined: 11 Dec 2013

PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 4:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

To the OP. You need to tell the government you are a non-resident. They'll find out eventually anyways. You think they are just going to let this go. They'll audit you if you ignore their request for a tax return. You have to fess up to being a non-resident and pay back all those HST checks. Sorry you got caught. Everyone does eventually.
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Wildbore



Joined: 17 Jun 2009

PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 6:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rockhard wrote:
To the OP. You need to tell the government you are a non-resident. They'll find out eventually anyways. You think they are just going to let this go. They'll audit you if you ignore their request for a tax return. You have to fess up to being a non-resident and pay back all those HST checks. Sorry you got caught. Everyone does eventually.


Another ignorant post. There is no way to "tell" the government you are a non-resident. They decide, based on several facts. Probably most of us keep our health insurance, driver's license, passport, and bank account. As well as memberships in different organizations (political party, organization, religious body, etc.)

You may also have a "home" in Canada. This could mean your parents house, or friends house, or any other place the CRA decides you could live.

From CRA website:
Significant residential ties to Canada include:

a home in Canada;
a spouse or common-law partner in Canada; and
dependants in Canada;

Secondary residential ties that may be relevant include:

personal property in Canada, such as a car or furniture;
social ties in Canada, such as memberships in Canadian recreational or religious organizations;
economic ties in Canada, such as Canadian bank accounts or credit cards;
a Canadian driver's licence;
a Canadian passport; and
health insurance with a Canadian province or territory.

The residential ties you establish or maintain in other countries may also be relevant.
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Stan Rogers



Joined: 20 Aug 2010

PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 4:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The government does keep a list of people coming and going from the country. I knew a guy who was drawing EI while teaching in Korea years ago. He got caught and was forced to pay every cent of it back.

For those of you messing around and thinking you'll get away with it, all I can say is; if they want to put the screws to you they can.
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