Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Korean Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Visa Issuance
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> FAQ
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Circus Monkey



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Location: In my coconut tree

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2003 12:11 am    Post subject: Visa Issuance Reply with quote

Lost Seoul was kind enough to pass along this information. Hopefully this should answer some questions. CM

Here are the laws regarding E2 visa issuance please read them carefully.
-------------------------------------
E-2 Status (Teaching Foreign Languages)
A. The Object of Visa Issuance
The E-2 visa is available to individuals who have the qualifications specified by the Minister of justice and desire to instruct foreign languages at foreign language institutions, educational institutions of elementary school and higher levels or their attached language research institutions, or language training institutions attached to public/private companies or broadcasting stations, or other institutions/organizations corresponding to such institutions as described above.
In principle, a foreign language instructor shall be a native speaker of the teaching language.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTITUTIONS OR ORGANIZATIONS:
- Educational institutions of elementary school and higher levels or their annex language research institutions
- Foreign language institutions registered according to the Act on establishment of institute.
- Language training institutions attached to public/private companies or organizations.
B. Application and Required Documents
A foreigner shall make an application for a visa to a Korean Embassy or Consulate abroad and required documents are as follows:
Passport
Application form
Required documents
- employment contract
- copy of diploma
- substantiating documents for a foundation of institution or organization
- reference
If necessary, the chief of a Korean Embassy or Consulate abroad may ask an applicant to submit more documents than required.
As you need to make an application for your visa to a Korean embassy or consulate abroad if you go out to Korea to find a job and obtain employment whilst inside the Republic of Korea you will then have to do what is known as a 'visa run.' In which you fly out of Korea to where there is a foreign Korean embassy or consulate and apply for your visa. The usual destination is Osaka (Japan) but your employer will tell you what to do and where to go, they should also pay for your flight and accommodation to wherever they send you to obtain a visa, if not I would steer clear of that institute.
When the application is approved, the chief of a Korean Embassy or Consulate abroad shall affix a visa stamp in the passport of the applicant. On a visa stamp, there are the status of sojourn(E-2), period of stay(less than 1 year) and validity of a visa.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gajackson1



Joined: 27 Jan 2003
Location: Casa Chil, Sungai Besar, Sultanate of Brunei

PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2003 4:33 am    Post subject: addendum: Reply with quote

Osaka is the usual destination for a Seoul-based Visa run; in the south, F u k u o k a is more common.

If you plan on doing ANY sort of vacationing/travel outside of Korea while you are working here (say, a holiday over in SEAM area), you will want to apply for a Multiple Re-Entry Visa/Permit; otherwise, you might be in for a nasty surprise when you have bags and tickets in hand, but Immigration/Passport control won't let you on your plane. You can usually do this at the same time as your initial Visa issuance (let your boss know), but some do it ipso facto.

Regards,

Glen
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
The Great Wall of Whiner



Joined: 24 Jan 2003
Location: Middle Land

PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2003 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And, in regards to Osaka, it is usually done within one day (go there, get visa, and get back to Korea).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kylehawkins2000



Joined: 08 Apr 2003

PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2003 1:22 pm    Post subject: Pusan Web Reply with quote

If you are heading to F u k u o k a for a visa run you may want to check out the excellent info provided on www.pusanweb.com. They have step by step instructions with photos!

Just go to the webpage and look under the 'guides' section.

Good luck all!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
blah



Joined: 08 May 2003
Location: Ulsan, Korea

PostPosted: Sun Jun 08, 2003 4:17 am    Post subject: Authentication Reply with quote

I would like to also add to your list of requirements that your diploma – even if it is the original – will need to be authenticated in the jurisdiction where it was earned. In my case, the embassy in Manila made me send mine, along with a copy of my driver’s license, to a family member in Vancouver (where I earned it), who then had to take it to the local embassy for authentication. Then my family member had to send it back to me in the Philippines.

Consular offices are rarely consistent in their interpretation of policy, so it’s always a good idea to phone ahead and find out the details before making a potentially long and costly trip for nothing.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
em



Joined: 15 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2003 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here in Toronto the Korean Consulate wants you to have the copies of your diploma notarized (I used a lawyer) before they will authenticate them - which adds yet another step to the paper trail leading to Korea. I would be sure to call your local Consulate/Embassy before you visit to find out whether or not this is the case for you - it clearly varies from one institution to another.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
blah



Joined: 08 May 2003
Location: Ulsan, Korea

PostPosted: Sat Jul 26, 2003 2:16 am    Post subject: Transcript Reply with quote

I have complied with the requirements mentioned in my previous post (above). I sent my diploma back to Vancouver to be authenticated at the Korean Consulate nearest where it was earned. I forwarded my stamped copy from said embassy to Korea for processing. And guess what?

I have been informed that they now require a transcript as well.

So all of out there should be prepared to include a transcript. Just to be safe, I would recommend getting two copies: an Official Copy (sealed in an envelope at its point of origin), and an unofficial copy (that can be photocopies as many times as you might need it). Better to have too much documentation than to be bogged down acquiring more.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
K-in-C



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Location: Heading somewhere

PostPosted: Mon Oct 20, 2003 7:09 am    Post subject: Curious Kate's immigration question. Reply with quote

Hi there,

If an employer and employee agree to break a contract will the former employee have problems getting another job? By this I mean will the Korean Immigration officials give the person a hard time?

Just wondering,

K-in-C
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
The Bobster



Joined: 15 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Mon Oct 20, 2003 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
If an employer and employee agree to break a contract will the former employee have problems getting another job? By this I mean will the Korean Immigration officials give the person a hard time?


Gonna quibble with terms, but you'll like the result.

When people agree, a contract is not "broken," it is more precisely "dissolved." You can break the contract, or your employer can, but if the two of you get together and agree on the thing, it's not broken.

EGBOK, baby. Everything's Gonna Be OK.

The only way you get to have a hard time is if your employer doesn't like you, in which case he or she will refuse to write you a letter of release. This is just a letter saying that the previous contract holder releases you of any responsibility to fulfill the previous terms, and therefore you are free to seek and obtain employment elsewhere.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
K-in-C



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Location: Heading somewhere

PostPosted: Mon Oct 20, 2003 5:58 pm    Post subject: Thanks Reply with quote

[quote="The Bobster"][quote]
Gonna quibble with terms, but you'll like the result.

When people agree, a contract is not "broken," it is more precisely "dissolved." You can break the contract, or your employer can, but if the two of you get together and agree on the thing, it's not broken.


No worries. Quibble away, cutie. Wink Thanks!

Until next time,

K-in-C
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bendrix



Joined: 14 Oct 2003

PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 3:03 pm    Post subject: Certificate for Confirmation of Visa Issuance Reply with quote

I'm still in the U.S. and I've received my Certificate for Confirmation of
Visa Issuance.

What do I do now? Do I just mail my certificate and passport to the nearest Korean Consulate? Is there a special form I should fill out first? I need to get a multi-entry visa too.

THanks in advance.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
lush72



Joined: 18 Aug 2003
Location: I am Penalty Kick!

PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 3:35 pm    Post subject: Re: Certificate for Confirmation of Visa Issuance Reply with quote

Bendrix wrote:
I'm still in the U.S. and I've received my Certificate for Confirmation of Visa Issuance.

What do I do now? Do I just mail my certificate and passport to the nearest Korean Consulate? Is there a special form I should fill out first? I need to get a multi-entry visa too.

THanks in advance.


Yes, there is a form. It is the “Republic of Korea Application for Visa”. You will need to download it from one of the Korean Consulate websites or pick it up at the K Consulate servicing your area. You also need a passport-sized photo. When you contact the consulate be sure to ask them what couriers they use for Visa processing. I have found that the process is much faster if you actually go to the consulate in person. If there isn’t a close by office just call the consulate nearest to you. A list of Korean consulates in the US can be found here http://www.asianinfo.org/asianinfo/government/embassies/south_korea.htm

When your ready get
1. Your completed form
2. Passport sized picture(s) (cant remember if you need only one- I have always used the passport picture machine so I always had 4 with me)
3. Your “blue” paper
4. Your passport
5. 45 dollars visa fee
togther and visit the Embassy. They will stamp your passport (usually you cant pick up your passport till the next day) with your new E-2!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
mb2086



Joined: 10 Feb 2004
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Sun Mar 28, 2004 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe I'm being a bit thick but let me get this right. If I come over on a visitor visa and get a job I will then have to go on a visa run for the E2 Visa. That bit I understand. What I don't understand is why my original Degree certificate (not a notarised copy) will not be sufficient - does that have to be notarised in my country in some way or not?

I would like to make another point also. In 2001 the Lonely Planet guide to Korea said that the Korean governmant were considering allowing the work visa to be issued wholly in Korea, but three years later nothing seems to have changed. This visa run thing is utter nonsense it seems to me - a complete waste of time and money for all concerned. Why do they still insist on it? If I go to Taiwan on a visitors visa I can get a work visa without leaving the country.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
just because



Joined: 01 Aug 2003
Location: Changwon - 4964

PostPosted: Sun Mar 28, 2004 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mb2086 wrote:
What I don't understand is why my original Degree certificate (not a notarised copy) will not be sufficient

Since when????? Mine always has been, original and notarised.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
oneiros



Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Location: Villa Straylight

PostPosted: Sun Mar 28, 2004 6:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mb2086 wrote:
Maybe I'm being a bit thick but let me get this right. If I come over on a visitor visa and get a job I will then have to go on a visa run for the E2 Visa. That bit I understand. What I don't understand is why my original Degree certificate (not a notarised copy) will not be sufficient - does that have to be notarised in my country in some way or not?
.


Your original degree plus transcripts will be sufficient. You just have to really trust your employer before you hand them your original degree. You might have a hard time getting it back from them (as I learned the hard way.) So, yes, it can be done with your original degree, but be careful.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> FAQ All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2013 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International