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Visa Rejection - What are the Odds?
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Ramanujan88



Joined: 29 Mar 2015

PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2015 1:29 pm    Post subject: Visa Rejection - What are the Odds? Reply with quote

Okay, I just sent all my visa documents to my recruiter for a teaching job in South Korea. Everything is in order…

1. Have a job waiting for me in SK (signed the contract)
2. Clean bill of health - no to all the questions
3. Clean Background check (no misdemeanors or crimes)
4. My Diplomas are valid and with apostilles

Are there any reasons other then mentioned above for denial? My bosses are kind and seem excited that I'm on my way and my recruiter is already telling me the next step before the Visa is processed. But I'm hoping there's nothing I'm missing that would cause visa rejection. This is my first time. I'm sure afterward, I'll understand the ropes.
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TheMeerkatLover



Joined: 26 Mar 2009

PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2015 5:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found it interesting that you felt the need to state your diploma's were 'valid' (I'll come back to this one).

You didn't receive a clean bill of health, you simply checked 'no' to the questionnaire (and you could be lying for all we know).

The way you answered #3 seems a little off.

Your writing style suggests you are not a native speaker. You state 'everything is in order', present your 'checklist' and are 'concerned' with a visa rejection.

The issues that would get you a rejection is if you failed the medical after you arrived, your degrees were purchased in Thailand or some other 3rd world market in SE Asia.

Your comment that your 'diploma' is 'valid' with apostilles is a red flag to me. These can be purchased now. I sincerely hope you're not interested in faking your way into the country like so many b4 you (and ending up badly).
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Ramanujan88



Joined: 29 Mar 2015

PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2015 6:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh no, I was afraid I would get someone like you to respond. I'm not sure if you're trolling or being seriously paranoid. Either way, you didn't answer my question. I was wondering if there's other things that the Immigration Office review when you're coming over. Not for validation of what I've already done. But to respond to your points…

Well, my Diplomas are legit (with an apostille). I'm sure the Immigration Office could get in contact with my universities and confirm that. Not worried there.

I got a physical here (so I could know ahead of time that all was in order and no surprise results came with my blood work, urine, etc). I know I have to get another one actually in SK, but unless I develop AIDS in the next few weeks, everything should be fine in that sense.

What do you mean #3 seems a little off? I either have a clean background check or I don't. I have one and the FBI sent results to prove it.

I'm a native speaker. Born and raised in the USA, speaking English. I've also been a teacher for 10 years. I'm not sure how I threw you off. I'm talking in a casual, loose tone because this is a forum not an interview room, so I'm not concerned with writing like I would to my boss.

But I guess I'm wasting my time, no matter what I tell you, you could accuse me of lying. So please open your mind a bit, and consider this. Many teachers are first time work travelers when they go overseas. So they're unfamiliar with the E-2 Visa process and maybe want to make sure they didn't make any little mistake. For instance, I read things online for people's applications getting rejected for little reasons (like having a cavity, or their diploma name having their middle initial when their passport didn't). I was asking around to see if there are things to watch out for, so one doesn't get rejected for any avoidable reason.

That's not too hard to understand. Now can you help me or not? If everything IS in order (if you don't believe me, just say hypothetically to humor your attitude), is it really hard to get a Visa? Forgive me that I'm nervous about my first time around. Though I figure a lot of people are, whether or not they are telling the truth.
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Aine1979



Joined: 20 Jan 2013
Location: Incheon

PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2015 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had similar worries, with things like leaving my job at home and then maybe not getting my visa top of my list.

As long as your documents are in order, (CBC within 6 months, everything apostilled etc), once your docs are submitted to Korean Immigration, there should be no problems getting your visa issuance number. After that it's fairly straightforward, you send the application form, visa fee and your passport off to the embassy/consulate, and get your passport back with the visa inside. If your recruiter/employer are efficient, you'll have the VIN in about 7 days.

Once you get to Korea and have your medical done, you'll get your ARC. Relax, if you've done everything properly, and from your post it sounds like you have, there won't be any problems.
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Stan Rogers



Joined: 20 Aug 2010

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 12:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just got to love the OP's post. He doesn't trust his future employer, he doesn't trust his recruiter, and he doesn't trust the Korean government but he does trust a bunch of unknown people online. I'm caught between laughing my ass off and Rolling Eyes
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schwa



Joined: 18 Jan 2003
Location: Yap

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 1:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There normally arent any sudden secret denial criteria. Seems you've got everything in order. Hope you enjoy your stint in Korea, sincerely.
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Ramanujan88



Joined: 29 Mar 2015

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 5:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Stan Rogers wrote:
Just got to love the OP's post. He doesn't trust his future employer, he doesn't trust his recruiter, and he doesn't trust the Korean government but he does trust a bunch of unknown people online. I'm caught between laughing my ass off and Rolling Eyes


Why are you being mean? First off, I'm a girl. Second, I do trust my employer, my recruiter, and the Korean government. I'm not afraid of them, and I've asked all these questions to them, but I also like getting tips from Americans online cause they suggested I do that ("research as much as you can"). Why is it so hard for people to understand that first timers may be nervous or uncertain on how things will pan out. Can you understand that? But I'm sure you've never been worried even once your life when you're about to leave everything you've ever known behind and go live/work in a whole new country.
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Ramanujan88



Joined: 29 Mar 2015

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 5:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aine1979 wrote:
I had similar worries, with things like leaving my job at home and then maybe not getting my visa top of my list.

As long as your documents are in order, (CBC within 6 months, everything apostilled etc), once your docs are submitted to Korean Immigration, there should be no problems getting your visa issuance number. After that it's fairly straightforward, you send the application form, visa fee and your passport off to the embassy/consulate, and get your passport back with the visa inside. If your recruiter/employer are efficient, you'll have the VIN in about 7 days.

Once you get to Korea and have your medical done, you'll get your ARC. Relax, if you've done everything properly, and from your post it sounds like you have, there won't be any problems.


Thank you for understanding. And thank your replying throughly and politely without stupidity or ego as some posters do. Forums should be to help each other out not mock one another. I'm pretty sure everything will work out as I've nothing to hide and have followed all the steps. But one is just nervous till they get a hold of that 1st Visa and actually start work. I'm sure I'll look back on this one day and not know what the big deal is.
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Chaparrastique



Joined: 01 Jan 2014

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 5:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are right to worry OP.

Applying for or renewing a visa is as much of a gamble as the job itself. There is no way to be sure what will happen.

I've had my visa rejected before. The fact is that no single person knows the full regulations- often including the immigration officers- who are rotated and replaced with every change in wind direction. Staff turnover at immigration is high, nobody gets to stay in any job long enough to be expert at it. And those regulations are ever-changing.
Visa stipulations can be updated at any time without recruiters or employers being made aware. Over time, the transitory nature of everything in this country and the dictatorial whims of petty officials leads to a kind of chaotic normality in which nobody can be sure of anything until it has actually happened. That's korea.
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Ramanujan88



Joined: 29 Mar 2015

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 5:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chaparrastique wrote:
You are right to worry OP.

Applying for or renewing a visa is as much of a gamble as the job itself. There is no way to be sure what will happen.

I've had my visa rejected before. The fact is that no single person knows the full regulations- often including the immigration officers- who are rotated and replaced with every change in wind direction. Staff turnover at immigration is high, nobody gets to stay in any job long enough to be expert at it. And those regulations are ever-changing.
Visa stipulations can be updated at any time without recruiters or employers being made aware. Over time, the transitory nature of everything in this country and the dictatorial whims of petty officials leads to a kind of chaotic normality in which nobody can be sure of anything until it has actually happened. That's korea.


Thank you for letting me know. That's why I'm afraid of. Well, I'm not sure what more I can do other than follow regulations. You said you've had your visa rejected before…do they let you know the reason when they do this? Hopefully, there's nothing I'm missing, and I'll be working there soon.
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Chaparrastique



Joined: 01 Jan 2014

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 6:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ramanujan88 wrote:

Thank you for letting me know. That's why I'm afraid of. Well, I'm not sure what more I can do other than follow regulations. You said you've had your visa rejected before…do they let you know the reason when they do this? Hopefully, there's nothing I'm missing, and I'll be working there soon.


My mistake was listening to my recruiter, who didn't realize the regulations vary with each nationality and even within that depending on your individual circumstances.

yes, they will let you know after the fact why your visa was rejected. In my case-years ago- it was because my CRC had been certified by my embassy at a time when they had suddenly changed the guidelines.


It sounds like you will be ok.

But I tend to be allergic to anything to do with officialdom, form-filling and government bureaucracy. The right hand doesn't know what the left is doing. This is partly why working in korea has become too much hassle and too much of a gamble. Given the intricate assault course you are expected to go through just to apply, and the perfect timing needed for all the variables to come together... there is too much margin for error. And if you find that your job sucks, your boss is a lying abuser, or someone has accidentally lost your documents at some point in the chain- well...you are the one who gets to undergo the whole performance all over again.
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Guajiro



Joined: 04 Dec 2008

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 5:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ramanujan88 wrote:
Oh no, I was afraid I would get someone like you to respond. I'm not sure if you're trolling or being seriously paranoid. Either way, you didn't answer my question. I was wondering if there's other things that the Immigration Office review when you're coming over. Not for validation of what I've already done. But to respond to your points…

Well, my Diplomas are legit (with an apostille). I'm sure the Immigration Office could get in contact with my universities and confirm that. Not worried there.

I got a physical here (so I could know ahead of time that all was in order and no surprise results came with my blood work, urine, etc). I know I have to get another one actually in SK, but unless I develop AIDS in the next few weeks, everything should be fine in that sense.

What do you mean #3 seems a little off? I either have a clean background check or I don't. I have one and the FBI sent results to prove it.

I'm a native speaker. Born and raised in the USA, speaking English. I've also been a teacher for 10 years. I'm not sure how I threw you off. I'm talking in a casual, loose tone because this is a forum not an interview room, so I'm not concerned with writing like I would to my boss.

But I guess I'm wasting my time, no matter what I tell you, you could accuse me of lying. So please open your mind a bit, and consider this. Many teachers are first time work travelers when they go overseas. So they're unfamiliar with the E-2 Visa process and maybe want to make sure they didn't make any little mistake. For instance, I read things online for people's applications getting rejected for little reasons (like having a cavity, or their diploma name having their middle initial when their passport didn't). I was asking around to see if there are things to watch out for, so one doesn't get rejected for any avoidable reason.

That's not too hard to understand. Now can you help me or not? If everything IS in order (if you don't believe me, just say hypothetically to humor your attitude), is it really hard to get a Visa? Forgive me that I'm nervous about my first time around. Though I figure a lot of people are, whether or not they are telling the truth.


In your initial post your context was a bit vague, so it was hard to know if there might be something to throw off your visa application. You answered 1 question here; native speaker born and raised in USA.

Were you educated in the USA, Canada, UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand or South Africa since the 7th grade through university?

Are you under the age of retirement for teachers in Korea?

Did you get the Apostille on your FBI check (less than 6 mos. old) from the Dept. of State in Washington, D.C.?

Did you get the state-level Apostille on your notarized degree copy?

That's all I can think of at the moment. If you followed those steps correctly and the position didn't get filled in the meantime you should be good to go.

Best of luck!
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Ramanujan88



Joined: 29 Mar 2015

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Guajiro wrote:


In your initial post your context was a bit vague, so it was hard to know if there might be something to throw off your visa application. You answered 1 question here; native speaker born and raised in USA.

Were you educated in the USA, Canada, UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand or South Africa since the 7th grade through university?

Are you under the age of retirement for teachers in Korea?

Did you get the Apostille on your FBI check (less than 6 mos. old) from the Dept. of State in Washington, D.C.?

Did you get the state-level Apostille on your notarized degree copy?

That's all I can think of at the moment. If you followed those steps correctly and the position didn't get filled in the meantime you should be good to go.

Best of luck!


Thank you very much for your follow up. I appreciate it.

Yes, I've been educated in the US all my life, including a Bachelors and Masters in English.

Yes, I'm in my 20s. Think that's young enough. But I've been teaching 10 years so am not too inexperienced.

Yes, I got an apostille for my FBI check from the Dept of State in DC (I almost missed that one by accident as my other apostilles came from my own state, but got it at the last minute).

And the position does not start till July 1st. My boss continues to talk with me online about lessons plans and info on living in Korea. Sounds like a good sign.

Thank you again for your info. Hopefully the process goes well.
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tophatcat



Joined: 09 Aug 2006
Location: under the hat

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ramanujan88 wrote:
Guajiro wrote:


In your initial post your context was a bit vague, so it was hard to know if there might be something to throw off your visa application. You answered 1 question here; native speaker born and raised in USA.

Were you educated in the USA, Canada, UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand or South Africa since the 7th grade through university?

Are you under the age of retirement for teachers in Korea?

Did you get the Apostille on your FBI check (less than 6 mos. old) from the Dept. of State in Washington, D.C.?

Did you get the state-level Apostille on your notarized degree copy?

That's all I can think of at the moment. If you followed those steps correctly and the position didn't get filled in the meantime you should be good to go.

Best of luck!


Thank you very much for your follow up. I appreciate it.

Yes, I've been educated in the US all my life, including a Bachelors and Masters in English.

Yes, I'm in my 20s. Think that's young enough. But I've been teaching 10 years so am not too inexperienced.

Yes, I got an apostille for my FBI check from the Dept of State in DC (I almost missed that one by accident as my other apostilles came from my own state, but got it at the last minute).

And the position does not start till July 1st. My boss continues to talk with me online about lessons plans and info on living in Korea. Sounds like a good sign.

Thank you again for your info. Hopefully the process goes well.


You are in your 20s and have been teaching for 10 years?
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Ramanujan88



Joined: 29 Mar 2015

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 11:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes. I'm 27. Been teaching since I was 17.
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