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Ron Paul wins in Maine, Nevada and NOW Minnesota
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ontheway



Joined: 24 Aug 2005
Location: Somewhere under the rainbow...

PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 10:33 am    Post subject: Ron Paul wins in Maine, Nevada and NOW Minnesota Reply with quote

Early reports reveal that Paul has won 22 of 25 national delegate spots in Nevada, at least 15 of 24 in Maine.

While the media has reported "wins" for Romney and others, the final selection of delegates is what counts.

Dozens of other Ron Paul delegates have been selected in various states who are bound to another candidate only for the first round of voting at the Republican National Convention.

While it looks like Romney will win on the first round, if enough delegates can be torn away to push the voting to a second round anything can happen.



Edit:

Quote:
"Victories in Minnesota and other states demonstrate that Ron Paul supporters possess the adaptability, organizational muscle, and unmatched enthusiasm required to continue winning delegates in upcoming contests," Paul campaign manager John Tate said in a statement.

Paul's victory means 32 of Minnesota's 40 national delegates will now be committed to Paul at this summer's Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla. The libertarian-leaning GOP candidate is remaining in the presidential race to compete for delegates in the hopes of shaping the convention and influencing the party platform.


Last edited by ontheway on Mon May 21, 2012 10:47 am; edited 1 time in total
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ontheway



Joined: 24 Aug 2005
Location: Somewhere under the rainbow...

PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

more ...

Quote:
Although they’re pledged to back Romney (who won the state’s primary), 17 of 27 delegates selected at the Massachusetts caucuses last weekend support Paul.

Paul won 20 of 24 delegates allocated at congressional district conventions in Minnesota,

and they did very well in Louisiana last weekend – winning four and a half of six congressional district caucuses, which gives them 74 percent of the delegates to the state convention next month.

Paul supporters now co-chair the party in Alaska,

and they include a majority in the Iowa Republican State Central Committee.


Quote:

If Paul were to end up with a plurality of delegates from five states, he could be nominated from the convention floor.


http://news.yahoo.com/mitt-romney-worry-ron-paul-125020160.html
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ontheway



Joined: 24 Aug 2005
Location: Somewhere under the rainbow...

PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Early reports from Maine show Paul has won at least 15 of 24 delegates to the Republican national convention with nine still uncertain.


http://news.yahoo.com/paul-wins-majority-delegates-maine-gop-174422402.html

Quote:

Ron Paul supporters wrested control of the Maine Republican Convention and elected a majority slate supporting the Texas congressman to the GOP national convention, party officials said as the two-day convention neared its end Sunday. The results gave the Texas congressman a late state victory.

The names of 15 at-large delegates from Maine to the GOP nominating convention in Tampa, Fla., were posted Sunday as votes for the other delegation seats remained undecided. Maine is allotted a total of 24 delegates to the national convention.
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comm



Joined: 22 Jun 2010

PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's a pretty impressive push. If Romney wins the nomination, he's going to have to work pretty hard to keep Paul's team happy or there'll be chaos at the convention.

It's also worth noting the number of party positions Paul supporters have claimed recently. I'm looking forward to seeing what long-term effects his campaign has.
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Leon



Joined: 31 May 2010

PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's interesting that the champion of liberty can only win using procedural rules and trickery rather than any sort of mass popular will. I wonder if those procedural rules are any where to be found in the constitution.
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caniff



Joined: 03 Feb 2004
Location: All over the map

PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Leon wrote:
It's interesting that the champion of liberty can only win using procedural rules and trickery rather than any sort of mass popular will.


What could also be noteworthy is the fact that most of the "mass" is an obese, short-sighted, and extremely naive electorate that wouldn't understand a basic economic principle if it sat on it's collective face and wiggled.

America needs Ron Paul a hell of a lot more that it needs a conniving sociopathic douche of the likes of Mitt Romney.

(We here in Massachusetts have dealt with Mittens before, and can attest to his utter douchebaggery.)
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comm



Joined: 22 Jun 2010

PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Leon wrote:
It's interesting that the champion of liberty can only win using procedural rules and trickery rather than any sort of mass popular will. I wonder if those procedural rules are any where to be found in the constitution.

So in the Constitution, does the person who wins the popular vote automatically take office? People quickly forget that the Constitution establishes a republican form of government explicitly because democracy is a bad idea. Most people are stupid, ignorant, indifferent, petty, or a combination of all of the above. The idea behind elected representatives (or in this case, elected delegates) is to avoid democracy. I can't think of a more Constitution-based system than delegate election.
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Leon



Joined: 31 May 2010

PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

caniff wrote:
Leon wrote:
It's interesting that the champion of liberty can only win using procedural rules and trickery rather than any sort of mass popular will.


What could also be noteworthy is the fact that most of the "mass" is an obese, short-sighted, and extremely naive electorate that wouldn't understand a basic economic principle if it sat on it's collective face and wiggled.

America needs Ron Paul a hell of a lot more that it needs a conniving sociopathic douche of the likes of Mitt Romney.

(We here in Massachusetts have dealt with Mittens before, and can attest to his utter douchebaggery.)


Sounds like a pretty authoritarian view point to me. Most people are stupid, and need us to take care of them. As to the economics thing, Paul's economic ideas have been discredited, not by the masses, but by economists so many times that this idea that he is the last word on economics is pretty laughable.
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Leon



Joined: 31 May 2010

PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

comm wrote:
Leon wrote:
It's interesting that the champion of liberty can only win using procedural rules and trickery rather than any sort of mass popular will. I wonder if those procedural rules are any where to be found in the constitution.

So in the Constitution, does the person who wins the popular vote automatically take office? People quickly forget that the Constitution establishes a republican form of government explicitly because democracy is a bad idea. Most people are stupid, ignorant, indifferent, petty, or a combination of all of the above. The idea behind elected representatives (or in this case, elected delegates) is to avoid democracy. I can't think of a more Constitution-based system than delegate election.


Funny that the two people who rush to defend Paul on this both bad mouth democracy, liberty takes a bit of an Orwellian turn with you guys I guess. Again, I'm not sure that you realize this, but your position on this sounds strongly authoritarian. People are stupid and need others to decide what to do for them. They need help and guidance, not the power to decide for themselves.

At most this will get Paul some concessions, hopefully social ones, but that isn't likely as Romney needs social conservatives more than Pauls crowd. Also, Paul's crowd isn't going to vote for him in large numbers anyways so I don't really see how it is in Romney's interest to go to lengths to try and placate him.
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visitorq



Joined: 11 Jan 2008