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Male Gyopo accepted into Talk Program

 
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machew



Joined: 24 Apr 2012
Location: toronto

PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 12:44 am    Post subject: Male Gyopo accepted into Talk Program Reply with quote

Hi everyone,
I recently got accepted into the Talk program for the 2012 fall semester,
I need some clarification as to what visa I am supposed to apply for.

I am 20 and have lived in Canada my entire life.
My parents did not renounce their korean citizenship before i turned 18.
My grandfather entered my "Korean name" into the hojuk, however,
when I was born I was never legally given a korean name. My birth certificate only includes my English name.

Am I completely ruled out for an F4 application??
What are the disadvantages for a 2nd generation male to apply for a E2-2 visa? Is there a possibility I could get shipped out to the army?
Thank you and I hope to hear your responses!!!
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sml7285



Joined: 26 Apr 2012

PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 12:58 am    Post subject: Re: Male Gyopo accepted into Talk Program Reply with quote

machew wrote:

My parents did not renounce their korean citizenship before i turned 18.
My grandfather entered my "Korean name" into the hojuk, however,
when I was born I was never legally given a korean name.

Is there a possibility I could get shipped out to the army?



I'm in the same situation and I'm headed into the army in a few weeks, but voluntarily.

If they know you're in Korea, then you won't be able to leave.
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leibod1



Joined: 21 Mar 2010

PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 5:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If your father was still a Korean citizen when you were born, and your name is on the hojuk, then your name is in the Military Manpower Association database. They've been cracking down on what they deem to be "draft dodgers" over the last year and a half, as arbitrary and unfair as it may seem. My personal theory is maybe election year shenanigans? The key is whether you officially renounced your korean citizenship before the end of the year you turned eighteen (international age). If you did not, then I am sorry, there is no way out once you physically enter Korea, unless your physical check is level 5 (unsuitable for duty due to physical impairment). In that case, you would probably want to steer clear of Korea until your reach age 36, the age of ineligibility. I'm 35, and currently doing the service thing too after having been classified as a foreigner for 5 years. I fought it but to no avail. Now, if you or your family has considerable resources and connections, perhaps something could be arranged, as this is what I've heard, but it might just be an urban legend. Either way, sorry that this is not what you probably wanted to hear.
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machew



Joined: 24 Apr 2012
Location: toronto

PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've read that there is a new law where the hojuk system has become irrelevant. I'm not really worried about the hojuk. I was told my grandfather put my name in the hojuk before I was even born with my unofficial korean name and with the incorrect city (Montreal, I was born in Toronto).

http://www.korvia.com/index.php/faq/65-e2-visa-application-/685-gyopowhat-is-2nd-generation-overseas-korean-males-policy.html

this website says I am able to apply for the talk program for 1 year if i declare myself as a 2nd generation Korean to my embassy. Can anyone confirm this? I don't understand..why would the talk program even exist for current university students if only 1988 and older university students and females are eligible.
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alwaysbeclosing100



Joined: 07 Feb 2009

PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 8:03 pm    Post subject: re Reply with quote

the korvia link info seems rife with potential to be interpreted in a variety of ways. the trend seems to be going toward F visas only for males who do military service as the F visa benefits are similar to a citizen. Lets be frank......no male wants to do military service and your parents cant vote any longer in Korea so there is no liability to the govt. requiring you to do service.
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slasher



Joined: 24 May 2012

PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2012 1:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hojeok is not irrelevant, it is just changed and split into Basic registry and Family relationship records (both of them needed when applying for F4). So they will know who your parents are.

In my case, the military managed to connect the dot between when I left with a Korean passport as a child, and then came back 30 years later with a foreign passport with different English spelling of my Korean name (and no info about parents whatsoever provided). They called me to my work to require me to settle the nationality status.
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amoonbot



Joined: 29 Jul 2009

PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2012 9:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For sure, you do not qualify for an F-4 visa for two reasons.

1. You were born after May 1988.

2. During the time of your birth, your parents were Korean citizens or did not renounce their citizenship.

That being said, if you have a Korean surname (Kim, Park, Lee, etc), it will raise a red flag to immigration. Korean face plus Korean last name generally assures a search on your hojuk.

Since your English name won't match the Korean name on your hojuk, there's no way of immigration actually connecting the two. However, what they can do is request your birth certificate. They can say, "Oh, are you Korean American? We need to make sure you are not on the registry, etc, etc." On your birth certificate should be your father and mother's Korean name, which would signal a red flag on your behalf.
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sml7285



Joined: 26 Apr 2012

PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2012 11:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

amoonbot wrote:
For sure, you do not qualify for an F-4 visa for two reasons.

1. You were born after May 1988.

2. During the time of your birth, your parents were Korean citizens or did not renounce their citizenship.

That being said, if you have a Korean surname (Kim, Park, Lee, etc), it will raise a red flag to immigration. Korean face plus Korean last name generally assures a search on your hojuk.

Since your English name won't match the Korean name on your hojuk, there's no way of immigration actually connecting the two. However, what they can do is request your birth certificate. They can say, "Oh, are you Korean American? We need to make sure you are not on the registry, etc, etc." On your birth certificate should be your father and mother's Korean name, which would signal a red flag on your behalf.


Since 2005, South Korean citizens (males) have not been allowed to renounce their SK citizenship until after they have done their service.

I don't understand why there are so many threads lately about draft dodging. It's different from the US - it is required by law for a male Korean national to enter the military. Regardless of one's opinion on the matter, coming into the country with the intention of draft dodging is coming into the country with the intent to break the law.
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leibod1



Joined: 21 Mar 2010

PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 6:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, we probably want to give the OP the benefit of doubt. Being born and raised in a different country/culture, one can have different expectations of civic duties and responsibilities. I do not have a problem with people who feel that such a commitment is unfair, but sometimes that is exactly how the world works. Besides, he has not overtly stated that he intends to dodge the draft. It is quite possible that he will follow the actions of another poster whose thread I commented on and do the enlistment. Either way, I think the thread has pretty much covered what the South Korean government would classify the OP has, but maybe he'll slip through the cracks. At least the OP can now make an informed decision, and more importantly be prepared for the consequences if things do not work out in his favor.

P.S. To the OP, note that the Korvia website has a disclaimer at the bottom,

[Disclaimer] The Military Manpower Office of Korea may revoke the status of 2nd Generation Overseas Korean Male approved by the Korean Consulate/ Embassy.

The Military Manpower Office is the final authority on who has to serve and who doesn't. You should also note that to register your status as a 2nd generation male who is exempt, you have to be within Korea, which sets up a nice catch-22. So, honestly the only way to guarantee exemption is by medical waiver.
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sml7285



Joined: 26 Apr 2012

PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 2:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

leibod1 wrote:
So, honestly the only way to guarantee exemption is by medical waiver.


Yeah. I just had my ROK Army physical last week and saw some kids who were easily over 280 or so pounds get approved to serve. There was even one guy with a blood pressure level of over 170 who was approved.

Pretty much the only way you can get a medical waiver is by not having a working trigger finger or a torn ACL.
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NohopeSeriously



Joined: 17 Jan 2011
Location: The Christian Right-Wing Educational Republic of Korea

PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 7:59 am    Post subject: Re: Male Gyopo accepted into Talk Program Reply with quote

machew wrote:
I am 20 and have lived in Canada my entire life.
My parents did not renounce their korean citizenship before i turned 18.
My grandfather entered my "Korean name" into the hojuk


As a Korean-Canadian, that sounds like story from a horror movie. Every Korean who lives in Canada should renounce his or her Korean citizenship at all cost. It's the rule of thumb for every ethnic Koreans living in Canada.
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