Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Korean Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Tips for insulating my apartment this winter?
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> General Discussion Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Enigma



Joined: 20 Mar 2008

PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 8:06 pm    Post subject: Tips for insulating my apartment this winter? Reply with quote

I live in an older apartment, and like most older apartments in Korea, it's bloody cold in the winter. I have a heater that I use in my bedroom, but I wouldn't mind spending a few bucks to insulate my apartment a little better to keep the cold out and the heat in.
Do any of you have any suggestions for insulating an apartment that aren't going to break the bank?

Thanks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Swampfox10mm



Joined: 24 Mar 2011

PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Buy the window kits at emart. They really make a huge diff.

And remember.. . Electricity is expensive here. Do not think you are saving money by running an electric heater.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
lemak



Joined: 02 Jan 2011

PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bubble wrap, baby!

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/how-to-insulate-with-bubble-wr-99849

Those massive Korean balcony windows are appalling for keeping the heat in and cold out. Bubble wrap works well and will keep you apartment a few degrees warmer.

*edit* and don't forget most of the doors don't seal well....often a centimeter gap between them and the walls. Taping or stuff tissue or towel around the edges will make a huge difference in stopping the cold breeze leaking through.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Cacille



Joined: 05 Oct 2011

PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 4:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Take a REALLY CLOSE LOOK at the seals between the door edge. Bottom, top, sides. Look at how much of a gap there is. Light- does it come through the edges? It shouldn't much at all. Go into your local 1000won shop or mart. In the area of tools/home improvement or something, look for window/door weatherstripping. It's wrapped in a circle in a small package, of different widths. If it's a big gap, get thicker. If it's small, get thin. If it's tiny but you feel cold coming through, get just a thin strip of plastic to attach to it.
Oh, even if you live in an apartment with your door on the inside of hallway - well they don't heat hallways. It'll still help to put weatherstripping up.

For windows - That plastic stuff that has been mentioned. Also, bubblewrap is a great idea. However, the TAPE may be an issue. YOU need to find double-sided tape (which does exist in this country, I've seen it used by my co teacher and I'm in a rural area). DO. NOT. USE. DUCT. TAPE. OR. PACKING. TAPE. It will fall apart in a bad way in the spring when you take it down. You'll wanna attach the tape to the plastic/metal/combo of the windows. Not on the walls at all.

Other issues with cold coming through someplace else weird? Ask me. I'll have ideas you can use. I used to work for the past eight years at two major home improvement places, in the departments that dealt directly with this issue. I also was a house painter for five of those years at the same time. I dealt with issues like this with clients in the line of my work.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Swampfox10mm



Joined: 24 Mar 2011

PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 6:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another huge tip: Run a humidifier.

Keeping the humidity between 48 to 55 percent will make your home feel a lot toastier. Makes a huge difference. Just be sure to clean out the humidifier twice per week by sloshing clear water through it, dumping old water, and wiping down quickly with a wet tissue where possible.

DO NOT use any of the anti-bacterial liquids that were made ILLEGAL here in Korea last year due to serious health problems they were found to cause. Some stores and online merchants are still trying to pawn them off on the public rather than take a hit on owning the crap.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
fustiancorduroy



Joined: 12 Jan 2007

PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 7:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Get an apartment with double-pane windows. Better yet, get an apartment with two layers of double-pane windows. Then you won't have any problems with cold or need extra insulation.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
highstreet



Joined: 13 Nov 2010

PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 8:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

They sell 3M double sided tape.

Or you could just move to a new apt, cause that's such a helpful idea.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Weigookin74



Joined: 26 Oct 2009

PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

fustiancorduroy wrote:
Get an apartment with double-pane windows. Better yet, get an apartment with two layers of double-pane windows. Then you won't have any problems with cold or need extra insulation.


Better yet, get a new apartment or villa built within the past 5 years that actually has insulation and modern building standards. You won't need any of that bubble wrap or other stuff. The gas will work well and efficiently.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
alongway



Joined: 02 Jan 2012

PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't run a humidifier without checking your actual humidity first. A lot of people need a dehumidifier in Korea as they get condensation on their walls and mold during the winter.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Swampfox10mm



Joined: 24 Mar 2011

PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 3:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

alongway wrote:
Don't run a humidifier without checking your actual humidity first. A lot of people need a dehumidifier in Korea as they get condensation on their walls and mold during the winter.


Yeah, the last place we were in would get mold in the East veranda and was dry as a bone in the rest of the house (a glass door separated the two). I would have to crack open a window to get dry air from outside on that veranda to control mold.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ewlandon



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Location: teacher

PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 4:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

any tips for mold (sorry to derail). My apt gets super moldy in winter. I actually had to throw away some jackets and a suitecase because they got mold all over them.

My bathroom walls turn colors and now there is a black spot on my ceiling in my bedroom.




How do you stop it so it doesnt keep ruining my clothes and breathing.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Kimchifart



Joined: 15 Sep 2010

PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 4:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Weigookin74 wrote:
fustiancorduroy wrote:
Get an apartment with double-pane windows. Better yet, get an apartment with two layers of double-pane windows. Then you won't have any problems with cold or need extra insulation.


Better yet, get a new apartment or villa built within the past 5 years that actually has insulation and modern building standards. You won't need any of that bubble wrap or other stuff. The gas will work well and efficiently.



Have the standards actually changed in reality? I saw a couple of local villas being built, they did have that silver stuff on the walls and roof insulation, but the construction still looked very flimsy.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Enigma



Joined: 20 Mar 2008

PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 5:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks to everyone for all of the replies. They're very helpful.

I actually picked up some of that weather-stripping last week and put some of it up on the window frames, however I have to pick up some more. When I bought it (at Home-Plus) I remember seeing 2 kinds. I know it comes in different lengths, widths and thicknesses, but these were 2 different kinds of the same brand, as if they were 2 different materials or had 2 different purposes. I didn't look closely so I'm not sure what the difference was. The kind I got is called 문풍지, but I can't remember what the other one was called. Does anyone know if the difference is important, and if so, which one do I want?

Thanks again
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Lazio



Joined: 15 Dec 2010

PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 6:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kimchifart wrote:
Weigookin74 wrote:
fustiancorduroy wrote:
Get an apartment with double-pane windows. Better yet, get an apartment with two layers of double-pane windows. Then you won't have any problems with cold or need extra insulation.


Better yet, get a new apartment or villa built within the past 5 years that actually has insulation and modern building standards. You won't need any of that bubble wrap or other stuff. The gas will work well and efficiently.



Have the standards actually changed in reality? I saw a couple of local villas being built, they did have that silver stuff on the walls and roof insulation, but the construction still looked very flimsy.


Yeah, that silver “insulation” what they use is about half an inch thick. Whatever high-tech material is that (doubtful) it won’t make wonders on the 6” thick concrete walls. What actually makes a difference is to have heated apartments around you. On the edge of the building or top floor it will be cold no matter new or not.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ajuma



Joined: 18 Feb 2003
Location: Anywere but Seoul!!

PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 6:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Enigma wrote:
Thanks to everyone for all of the replies. They're very helpful.

I actually picked up some of that weather-stripping last week and put some of it up on the window frames, however I have to pick up some more. When I bought it (at Home-Plus) I remember seeing 2 kinds. I know it comes in different lengths, widths and thicknesses, but these were 2 different kinds of the same brand, as if they were 2 different materials or had 2 different purposes. I didn't look closely so I'm not sure what the difference was. The kind I got is called 문풍지, but I can't remember what the other one was called. Does anyone know if the difference is important, and if so, which one do I want?

Thanks again


I was just there and picked some up. One kind is foam and the other kind is kind of a bristly rug-type thing. I went with the foam. Also, at HomePlus, you can get a 2-pack for about 1,000 won more so be sure to check all of the packages and prices as they look very similar.

You should also get one of those things that go on the bottom of the door. It will keep the drafts out. They're a bit less than 5,000.

The best way to get more humidity in your apartment (unless you have a mold problem) is to hang your clothes inside. That will help a lot. No laundry to do? Soak a few towels, wring until they don't drip, and hang them up.

If you're not planning on opening your balcony door until spring, then put plastic over it. (Also found at HP) If you DO want to open it, see if you can find some rubberized curtain lining. If you're in Seoul, go to the fabric place in Dongdaemoon. That will help to keep the heat in and the cold out.

I'm a cold-weather person and am very comfortable at 65/16 degrees. Keeping your apartment cooler and putting on more clothes when you're sitting around could save you a bundle!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> General Discussion Forum All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2013 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International