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"Frankly speaking" and "Take a rest"
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Do you use "take a rest" and "frankly speaking"?
I don't use either expression
53%
 53%  [ 17 ]
I use both expressions
12%
 12%  [ 4 ]
I only use "frankly speaking"
6%
 6%  [ 2 ]
I only use "take a rest"
28%
 28%  [ 9 ]
Total Votes : 32

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Engrish Mufffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2013

PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2013 11:21 pm    Post subject: "Frankly speaking" and "Take a rest" Reply with quote

I'm curious about these two expressions, has anyone actually heard these expressions being used regularly in their home country?

It's no secret Koreans love to use these two and by use I actually mean overuse.

I was first asked this my first year in Korea, back 5 years ago, and ever since then I've always tried to be conscious of when people used it in real life, movies and TV shows. There's not a single instance where I've heard "frankly speaking" with friends back home or on TV shows and movies. However, I have had some native speakers here in Korea say people use it.

A search on Dave's gave me quite a few results of people on here using "frankly speaking." It is however no secret that native speakers who have been here for awhile start picking up bad English and even start using Konglish.

For "take a rest" I've heard it on a few occasions including on a workout video. However, "take a rest" seems to be used unnaturally and overused by Koreans. Take a break, get some rest, relaxing, hanging out are some alternatives (depending on the context).

For "frankly speaking" I've never heard anyone outside of Korea using it. Instead you often hear or read: frankly, to be frank, quite frankly, to be honest, and honestly.

In my opinion and in my short research, Americans don't really use either expression. I'm curious about the UK/Canada/Australia. Do you use the expression or not? Why do Koreans love to use these expressions in their textbook?
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Steelrails



Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Location: Earth, Solar System

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 12:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frankly speaking my dear I don't think I've ever heard that used.
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jammo



Joined: 12 Dec 2008

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 12:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

쉬세요/설직히 말하면....

thats your answer right there. commonly used phrases translated to English. Nothing more complex than that. Good question!
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Engrish Mufffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2013

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 1:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jammo wrote:
쉬세요/설직히 말하면....

thats your answer right there. commonly used phrases translated to English. Nothing more complex than that. Good question!

That could be it, but I would think that if it was from only one book, but it seems like it's in a ton of school books.
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Ocalmy



Joined: 18 Oct 2011

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 3:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Frankly speaking" is a term that might come up in the dialogue of a Hawthorne novel, but I don't hear anyone using it regularly. Its appeal for Koreans might be that it's kind of emboldening. It's no secret that many Koreans have trouble being direct. This little adverbial phrase, a warning that they're about to be direct, might come in handy.

"Take a rest" use to drive me crazy. Then I married a Korean and employed the old can't beat em' join em' strategy. Now the phrase is used so often in my home that I can't remember a time when it wasn't. Rolling Eyes

Language is alive... I've made peace with "take a rest"
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Who's Your Daddy?



Joined: 30 May 2010
Location: The joy's in the ride.

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 4:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Frankly speaking, I don't give a damn." I guess it was used in Gone with The Wind times.

"Take a rest" is Konglish to me.

Also, "long time no see" seems like Konglish too. It certainly doesn't sound like proper English.

I think the add on ending ",and you?" I've only encountered in Korea. I purposely never respond.
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maximmm



Joined: 01 Feb 2008

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 4:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Who's Your Daddy? wrote:
"Frankly speaking, I don't give a damn." I guess it was used in Gone with The Wind times.

"Take a rest" is Konglish to me.

Also, "long time no see" seems like Konglish too. It certainly doesn't sound like proper English.

I think the add on ending ",and you?" I've only encountered in Korea. I purposely never respond.


What country are you from?!
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Ginormousaurus



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Location: 700 Ft. Pulpit

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 5:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Engrish Mufffin wrote:
jammo wrote:
쉬세요/설직히 말하면....

thats your answer right there. commonly used phrases translated to English. Nothing more complex than that. Good question!

That could be it, but I would think that if it was from only one book, but it seems like it's in a ton of school books.


They are in a ton of books becuase they are the direct translations of common Korean phrases. Just like jammo said. I'm not sure why it being in lots of books makes the proposed explanation less valid.
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Seoulman69



Joined: 14 Dec 2009

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 5:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

fezmond wrote:
Frankly speaking is used in the UK a fair bit.


I've never heard that used where I'm from.
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J Rock



Joined: 17 Jan 2009
Location: The center of the Earth, Suji

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 6:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've never heard the, "Frankly Speaking my Dear," in Korea before but I've heard, "Take a rest," and that use to annoy me but i've gotten used to it.

I dont mind it anymore.
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Newbie



Joined: 07 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 7:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aren't these both commonly used in UK, Aus, Zealand?

I assume OP is American or Canadian?

"take a rest" always stood out to me as strange, but then I started noticing it in all the other commonwealth dialogue (less Canadians).

Quote:
Also, "long time no see" seems like Konglish too. It certainly doesn't sound like proper English.

I think the add on ending ",and you?" I've only encountered in Korea. I purposely never respond.


Really? Both of these are extremely common amongst people I talk to.
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ontheway



Joined: 24 Aug 2005
Location: Somewhere under the rainbow...

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Who's Your Daddy? wrote:
"Frankly speaking, I don't give a damn." I guess it was used in Gone with The Wind times.

"Take a rest" is Konglish to me.

Also, "long time no see" seems like Konglish too. It certainly doesn't sound like proper English.

I think the add on ending ",and you?" I've only encountered in Korea. I purposely never respond.



In Gone With the Wind the line was "Frankly my dear, I don't give a damn."

So, no "frankly speaking" there. The way "frankly speaking" is used in Korea is konglish and should be discouraged.

Some people do say things such as:

"Let me be frank with you." or
"Let me speak frankly ... " or
"Frankly, ... " etc.

"Frankly ... " is a good opener used to deliver difficult information or shocking news.

However, in the US it is common for the word "frankly" to be followed by a pack of lies.
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optik404



Joined: 24 Jun 2008

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 3:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think I've said, "I need to take a rest.", while playing sports or working out. Maybe I just said I need to rest.
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alongway



Joined: 02 Jan 2012

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 7:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This question seems to pop up every year from the less worldly crop of new teachers on various forums and blogs.

Some of these phrases are regional. Where I grew up, I frequently heard my parents and grandparents use the phrase "take a rest" in many situations.

You have to realize English education has been going on here since the late 1800's and they've had all kinds of dialects come through here. They don't always update text books and lessons with current common phrases and slang.

Frankly speaking certainly sounds like an older phrase, but it could still be in use as reporter, and probably found its way into a textbook somewhere.
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Chaucer



Joined: 20 Oct 2009

PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 7:28 pm    Post subject: Other Reply with quote

I hear these two all the time when students are "listening to" my classes.
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