Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Korean Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

How often does employer pay pension bill?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Job-related Discussion Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Pablo



Joined: 15 Dec 2011

PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2012 7:56 pm    Post subject: How often does employer pay pension bill? Reply with quote

Hello. How often does the pension office send a hagwon a bill for employee pension? I phoned the pension office to check on my account, and they say my employer paid for the first six months of my contract, but has not paid for the most recent four months after that. I forgot to ask them how often the bill is sent to the employer. Depending if it's every month, every three months, every six months, or whatever, the employer may or may not be paying correctly. Does anyone know how often a hagwon is billed for pension? Thanks for any information.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ttompatz



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Location: Kwangju, South Korea

PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2012 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They are supposed to pay the submissions quarterly (every 3 months).

.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
newb



Joined: 27 Aug 2012
Location: Korea

PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2012 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

National pension premium is paid every month on the 10th of each month at my school (PS).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pablo



Joined: 15 Dec 2011

PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2012 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Ttompatz and Newb. I went ahead and called the pension office again to ask directly. The pension office said that (at least in the case of my school) the employer receives a bill every month, and that he has not paid those bills for the last four months.

Which brings up a follow-up question. After how many months of employment would the employer look definitely wrong in the eyes of the labor board if employment is terminated early to avoid severance and airfare? I have completed my 10th month and am in my 11th. I'm considering when to talk with my employer about this pension issue. Is it better to wait until the 11th month has past or would it make no difference to the labor board after 10 months? Hope my question is clear.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Wildbore



Joined: 17 Jun 2009

PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2012 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pablo wrote:
Thank you Ttompatz and Newb. I went ahead and called the pension office again to ask directly. The pension office said that (at least in the case of my school) the employer receives a bill every month, and that he has not paid those bills for the last four months.

Which brings up a follow-up question. After how many months of employment would the employer look definitely wrong in the eyes of the labor board if employment is terminated early to avoid severance and airfare? I have completed my 10th month and am in my 11th. I'm considering when to talk with my employer about this pension issue. Is it better to wait until the 11th month has past or would it make no difference to the labor board after 10 months? Hope my question is clear.


Finish your job and pretend like you never heard of the pension matter. Rattling the cage in your final few months is risky. Collect your severance and final pay, then complain to the pension office. They will collect the defaulted payments for you.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
newb



Joined: 27 Aug 2012
Location: Korea

PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2012 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wildbore wrote:
Finish your job and pretend like you never heard of the pension matter. Rattling the cage in your final few months is risky. Collect your severance and final pay, then complain to the pension office. They will collect the defaulted payments for you.


+1
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cincynate



Joined: 07 Jul 2009
Location: Jeju-do, South Korea

PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2012 11:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The law says that they have to make a payment on the 10th of every month, but from what I understand, it is common practice to pay every quarter or even more. I wouldn't worry about it until your contract is finished. THEN go to the pension office and ask about your pension. If he still hasn't paid it, you can hound him or go have the pension office collect the payments.

HOWEVER.. ask for a paystub from your employer (they are legally obligated to provide you with one) to make sure you have proof that pension was deducted from your paycheck.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ttompatz



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Location: Kwangju, South Korea

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just be aware that if you go to the pension office after the fact they will require you to pay up YOUR portion of the premiums in FULL before they go after the employer.

You have 2 years after termination of employment to file the claim for unpaid contributions.

.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Wildbore



Joined: 17 Jun 2009

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 1:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ttompatz wrote:
Just be aware that if you go to the pension office after the fact they will require you to pay up YOUR portion of the premiums in FULL before they go after the employer.

You have 2 years after termination of employment to file the claim for unpaid contributions.

.


It sounds like the contribution was deducted from his wage, but the employer never sent it to the pension office. I'm fairly sure the liability would be on the employer for both contributions in this case.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
NYC_Gal 2.0



Joined: 10 Dec 2010

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 1:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Get pay stubs showing that pension was deducted, and you won't need to pay for it when you go to the pension office/labor board. Still, wait until after you leave the job before filing for it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Wildbore



Joined: 17 Jun 2009

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 3:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NYC_Gal 2.0 wrote:
Get pay stubs showing that pension was deducted, and you won't need to pay for it when you go to the pension office/labor board. Still, wait until after you leave the job before filing for it.


There is a lot of evidence that could help. Paystubs are the best. But a contract that states what the monthly withholding tax will be is also helpful in the absence of paystubs. Also, labor laws works in reverse onus. The wage payer needs to prove his deductions were legit. A labor inspector could verify the deductions as well, for example.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pablo



Joined: 15 Dec 2011

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 5:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks all around. That's good information, and it provides a lot to keep in mind. As it happens, the situation is even more convoluted...

My employer under-reported my salary (at less than half the actual amount) when opening my pension account. Yet the school deducted pension from my monthly pay slip corresponding to the full salary. When I contacted the pension office a few months into the contract to check on things, I found out about this and gently brought it up with my boss.

After continued elaborate dancing on my part, the employer agreed to pay me the difference missing to date in cash (since it's difficult or impossible for the pension office to change the figure originally registered), and also the employer has given me the remaining monthly accrued difference in cash... and written it on each remaining payslip. [Head in hands shaking.]

So now it's really complicated. I don't mind paying any of that cash back to the pension office, because they will turn it around and refund it to me when all's said and done. However it will be very complicated if I show the pension office my payslip. They will see that the employer under-reported. Which is okay, but it will get complicated trying to pull out all the threads again to come up with the amount the employer still owes.

That said, the pension office already tells me they realize the school hasn't paid the past four months. I wonder if that is enough for the pension office to push the school. (Any chance of that?) I suppose they will ask to see the payslips...

I'm thinking that I may need to just ask the school directly to correct the missing pension balance before resorting to exposing what happened to the pension office. It's bound to be clear to the school that I know that what happened was illegal and that the pension and tax office would be very interested to learn about it. I'm guessing there's a good chance they will cough it up. Still, I'm thinking I should wait until the much larger final salary, severance, and airfare are in the bank before bringing up the missing pension payments.


Last edited by Pablo on Tue Nov 27, 2012 6:10 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Wildbore



Joined: 17 Jun 2009

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, since I am almost in the EXACT SAME situation as you, I will tell you my story.

I worked for a Hagwon for 2 years, at the end, I went to get my lump-sum pension refund. When I checked the account balance, I noticed my income was reported by half, which amounted to my pension account being devastated. At the same time, the employer was deducting the rate of my full salary. He was deducting 90,000 employee contributions per month, according to my pay stub, but only remitting about 50,000.

So, I contacted the international pension office by email for an answer. They said the employer CAN voluntarily amend the employer income report and the taxable income report, and remit re-adjusted contribution amounts, which would solve the problems. I went to my former employer with an esteemed Korean friend and he agreed to make this adjustment. As of now, this "adjustment" is in process, according to my former employer, who said he sent in corrected paperwork.

Waiting for the funds to be remitted. My ex-employer has been doing this for years, I am the first foreigner to catch it.

It's been 3 months since I told my ex-director and my pension account STILL hasn't been corrected ( about 1,600,000 is owed to my account). I may very well go to the tax and pension office and make sure my STUPID and CORRUPT ex-employer gets an audit by the NPS and tax office. (one that he surely deserves). Problem is nobody at my pension or tax office speaks English (makes if difficult to file a complaint). My Korean friend is the one who told me I should give my ex-director a chance to file amended forms, instead of reporting him for an audit.

Thankfully I'm not the only one in this situation, and if you find a better and faster way to fix this, please enlighten me.

Sounds like your collected the "under-reported funds" in cash, which is horrible for you since you could benefit from the added matching employer amount. Not only that, the income tax office and health insurance office are also getting low-balled, which won't fair well for your employer if your complain.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
newb



Joined: 27 Aug 2012
Location: Korea

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 5:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
My Korean friend is the one who told me I should give my ex-director a chance to file amended forms, instead of reporting him for an audit.


Well, there's your problem right there. You and your K friend should've reported him for an audit. Why did you give the crook another chance to screw you again?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Wildbore



Joined: 17 Jun 2009

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

newb wrote:
Quote:
My Korean friend is the one who told me I should give my ex-director a chance to file amended forms, instead of reporting him for an audit.


Well, there's your problem right there. You and your K friend should've reported him for an audit. Why did you give the crook another chance to screw you again?


Because he will lose face otherwise (Koreans hate causing other Koreans to lose face, even when they are embezzling and stealing). We can still report him for an audit if he doesn't amend the paperwork voluntarily.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Job-related Discussion Forum All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2013 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International