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Habits you've picked up in Korea
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ewlandon



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Location: teacher

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 3:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

nautilus wrote:

I also feel no guilt at taking other peoples umbrellas if I so need.



so this is ok?
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Stan Rogers



Joined: 20 Aug 2010

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I started saying "yea yea yea."

I started saying "ok ok ok."
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schwa



Joined: 18 Jan 2003
Location: sokcho

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some things deeply ingrained in me now that carry over on my visits "home":
--bowing (more like a nod, acknowledging a greeting)
--breaking eye contact (after initial contact), which I know makes some westerners suspicious
--using my right hand to hand things to people
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NYC_Gal 2.0



Joined: 10 Dec 2010

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nolos wrote:
NYC_Gal 2.0 wrote:
I'm over 30, married, and have short hair—I am an ajumma. I've learned how to toss my bag to "reserve" a seat on the train. I'll give it up for someone ancient, male or female, of course, but middle-aged people aren't fragile little things unable to support themselves.

I also say "ooooaaa" a bit more than I'd like.

What is oooooaaaa?
Is it like how Koreans say wow?


Yes it is.
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PatrickGHBusan



Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Location: Busan (1997-2008) Canada 2008 -

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 5:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

schwa wrote:
Some things deeply ingrained in me now that carry over on my visits "home":
--bowing (more like a nod, acknowledging a greeting)
--breaking eye contact (after initial contact), which I know makes some westerners suspicious
--using my right hand to hand things to people


That does become ingrained after a while.
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rainman3277



Joined: 13 Sep 2009

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JustinC wrote:
Quote:
Another clueless jackwad. I don't care if you just ran a marathon--those seats are not for you and even if you do sit in them you should give them up if an old person gets on and wants to sit down.
Where do you guys learn this stuff? Must be taught in your homes growing up. Sad.

Another habit I have is clubbing baby seals and stealing candy from babies Laughing

The righteous indignation is strong in this thread.


Seals are overpopulated anyway, and what monster would give candy to a baby anyways??!! Choking hazard!
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rainman3277



Joined: 13 Sep 2009

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

T-J wrote:
No_hite_pls wrote:
1. using scissors in the kitchen
2. hiking weekly
3. driving threw red lights
4. making fruit shakes
5. bowing to people
6. wearing a shinny suit every once in awhile Cool
7. talking slowing and softly
8. I smile a lot here and didn't before



Losing your English.

I'm kidding. I'm kidding.


I wonder why educated people don't pull this stuff? ESL teachers love pointing out spelling and grammar mistakes. I never heard an engineer point out the structural problems of a building while sitting in a coffee shop. This is a habit A LOT of people in this country have to break.
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everything-is-everything



Joined: 06 Jun 2011

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rainman3277 wrote:
T-J wrote:
No_hite_pls wrote:
1. using scissors in the kitchen
2. hiking weekly
3. driving threw red lights
4. making fruit shakes
5. bowing to people
6. wearing a shinny suit every once in awhile Cool
7. talking slowing and softly
8. I smile a lot here and didn't before



Losing your English.

I'm kidding. I'm kidding.


I wonder why educated people don't pull this stuff? ESL teachers love pointing out spelling and grammar mistakes. I never heard an engineer point out the structural problems of a building while sitting in a coffee shop. This is a habit A LOT of people in this country have to break.




I can absolutely see an engineer making a comment about the structural conditions of a building.

Engineers are some of the most smug people out there.

Laughing


And don't get me started on psychiatrists. Plenty of professionals make comments on others based on the knowledge they've acquired.
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JustinC



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Location: We Are The World!

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been trying the reverse head nod. Instead of lowering my chin I raise it, usually with raised eyebrows and a hint of a smile but without the eyebrows or mouth also engaging I think it comes across as polite but not friendly, or maybe even slightly arrogant.

This is something that back home would be normal. Usually in a pub if there was another drinker who you saw regularly (or in a shop you go in a lot) but didn't know well enough to say "Hi Keith" or what ever you'd give them a nod. At Christmas you'd maybe slightly accentuate the nod, some raised eyebrows and an "Alright mate".

Of course you can't say "Alright" to a non-native speaker so the chin, eyebrow and corner of mouth raises should be accompanied by a "Hi" or "Hello" if you're wanting to communicate verbally at all. I haven't tried the reverse head nod with an "An nyoung" yet, I think mixing the cultures could prove to be messy and confusing.
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JustinC



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Location: We Are The World!

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now, who reading that didn't try physically raise their chin? Smile
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Privateer



Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Location: Easy Street.

PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 3:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I cock my head to one side and suck in my breath. But only to students.
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PRagic



Joined: 24 Feb 2006

PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 5:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Knowing when to shut up and listen. This is almost directly related to when I'm speaking in Korean situations, but I'd say it's a useful skill even when engaging others in one's native language(s). Started learning all about this little deployed skill when I was in the Army, but I have honed it here in Korea.
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UknowsI



Joined: 16 Apr 2009

PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've started bowing a lot and saying "aigoooo". I have also started making anju when I want to have a beer.
rainman3277 wrote:

I wonder why educated people don't pull this stuff? ESL teachers love pointing out spelling and grammar mistakes. I never heard an engineer point out the structural problems of a building while sitting in a coffee shop. This is a habit A LOT of people in this country have to break.

You don't know enough engineers. Some of us loves complaining about these kinds of things, but I guess we mostly complain to other engineers. My local bridge, which falls apart every summer, is a reoccurring topic.
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