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Lets settle this. Is Korean food "good for you?"
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highstreet



Joined: 13 Nov 2010

PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2012 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Isn't American ramen just ramen imported from Asia? I don't think I've ever seen an American brand of ramen. I don't like instant ramen though...
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John Stamos jr.



Joined: 07 Oct 2012
Location: Namsan

PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2012 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe it is, I don't know or care. I'm talking about that cup-o-noodles taste. There has to be something similar here, taste wise. What is it?
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g0t soymilk?



Joined: 19 Aug 2012

PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2012 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

highstreet and patrick you guys are so witty with your internet sarcasm
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Yagremohbhg



Joined: 04 Oct 2012
Location: Busan

PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2012 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's good for you if you like constant dioreah, and blandness, sure.

I mean it's okay and I DO have a favorite Korean dish (Sundooboo chiggae), but come on, it's kinda bland and meat is better not boiled - we all know that much.
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fermentation



Joined: 22 Jun 2009

PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2012 12:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm willing to bet most places put tons of MSG in their food, turning an otherwise "healthy" Korean dish into crap.
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byrddogs



Joined: 19 Jun 2009
Location: Shanghai

PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2012 2:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

KimchiNinja wrote:
Put another way, when I'm in China there is always some 350lb Amercian woman commenting how unhealthy it is for the elegant Shanghainese woman seated next to her to be eating a chunk of pork belly fat. She probably has some paperwork to intellectually prove her point too.

But results exist.


As a 2 year resident of Shanghai, I'm not buying this at all. I'm not sure where in Shanghai you frequent, but I've never seen (a 350lb American) or heard (anyone telling a local how unhealthy their food choices are publically) anything like that. Yet, you say it always happens when you are here; weird how someone who has lived here daily for years has never encountered such an occurrence and someone who only is here occasionally sees it all of the time.

Maybe this happens at your corporate dinners?
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PatrickGHBusan



Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Location: Busan (1997-2008) Canada 2008 -

PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2012 5:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yagremohbhg wrote:
It's good for you if you like constant dioreah, and blandness, sure.

I mean it's okay and I DO have a favorite Korean dish (Sundooboo chiggae), but come on, it's kinda bland and meat is better not boiled - we all know that much.


You eat in some bad places...seriously.

If you live in Busan there are literally dozens of great k-food places in most busy areas but hey, to each his own.
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wylies99



Joined: 13 May 2006
Location: I'm one cool cat!

PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2012 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The negatives about excessive spices and salt are overcome by Koreans because they drink a lot more water than most of us do, on a daily basis. If you eat all of that salt and spice and don't flush with water then you could face some consequences. If you choose to eat some of the saltier and spicer Korean foods then make sure you follow through with lots of water. Just keep that kind of thing in mind, especially if you're older.
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itiswhatitis



Joined: 08 Aug 2011

PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2012 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

South Korea has amongst the highest rates of stomach cancer in the world. This is due to a high sodium and low fiber diet (not to mention all the additives that are added into side dishes).

Up until recently there was a trade off: higher rates of stomach cancer but lower rates of obesity and heart disease. Now that ice cream and other high sugar foods are part of the routine Koreans are getting more fat and the trade off is ending. Koreans now get the worst of both worlds.

True story: I was at a presentation as part of my job with an education office (I won`t say which office) in 2008 (MAYBE 2009). This is a quote from the presenter from the education office: "you know Koreans eat a lot of kimchi, and you remember how many asian countries got SARS but we didn't get SARS". HUH??? Let's just say that none of us cared to ask for clarification as to what she was talking about!!!!!!
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byrddogs



Joined: 19 Jun 2009
Location: Shanghai

PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2012 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

itiswhatitis wrote:
True story: I was at a presentation as part of my job with an education office (I won`t say which office) in 2008 (MAYBE 2009). This is a quote from the presenter from the education office: "you know Koreans eat a lot of kimchi, and you remember how many asian countries got SARS but we didn't get SARS". HUH??? Let's just say that none of us cared to ask for clarification as to what she was talking about!!!!!!


I remember hearing the same thing when the H1N1 flu was going around. That is before SK was hit with multiple cases, of course.
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Kepler



Joined: 24 Sep 2007

PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I generally try to avoid eating pork here. Pork consumption has been correlated with liver cirrhosis, liver cancer, and multiple sclerosis. Eating samgyeopsal + alcohol= not a healthy combination. Pork is much more likely to be infected with dangerous pathogens than other meats and cooking may not kill all these pathogens.
The Trouble With Pork

White rice isn't particularly healthy or unhealthy. In large quantities it can make you fat since the body stores excess carbs as fat. Fermented foods contain a lot of the beneficial bacteria that live in our gut and help with digestion so eating lots of kimchi is probably healthy. I'm less concerned about eating fried foods than the kind of oil Koreans fry their food in. Oils from tropical plants (olive, coconut, macademia nut) are good choices. Ghee (clarified butter) is also a healthy choice.
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Yagremohbhg



Joined: 04 Oct 2012
Location: Busan

PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 9:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Of course there is no blanket 'Korean diet' or one of any other culture really. it's the choices you make within what is on offer that count.

Samguipsal every day obviously is not a wise one nor is chiggae from kimbap nara every day.
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Peace Train



Joined: 01 Nov 2012

PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 10:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ewlandon wrote:

Dude, your link doesnt prove anything about korean food being unhealthy. You show that bibimbop has bad stats nutrition wise. You can surprise people with things that like in any diet.

Also mcdonalds big mac is not a very good example of the worse food, it ssuprisingly not that unhealthy to eat a big mac. The problem with mcdonalds and fast food is people tend to eat it much more often then they should, if you made a hamgburger at home every day and drank cola and made homemade organic french fries the outcome would be the same.

Diet is not about one food item it is about balance. Eating bibimbop every day is probably healthier than eating mcdonalds every day even though it has more sodium and sugar, it is still more balanced. Also bimbimbop is usually made at home with vegies, rice, egg and red pepper paste, I'm sure it's healthier than the fast-food bibimbop that this nutritonal info is for.


Sorry, friend but you couldn't be more wrong. Your assumptions about nutrition are obviously rooted in the now defunct, fallacious USDA Food Pyramid. Like anything food related, lobbyists and special interest groups with deep pockets conspired to create this ubiquitous nutrition myth now responsible for killing millions.

http://blog.friendseat.com/food-pyramid-corruption-part-1/

^Just the first link I found. There are endless resources on the web discussing the above.

"Balanced" is complete and utter BS and something people need to scrub clean of their brain bones. Grains (read gluten and starch) serve absolutely no nutritional benefit. The same is true for any/all dairy products save for some essential fats that can be gleaned from specific, grass fed sources. One's daily source of carbs can be easily acquired from plant sources alone.

By saying nutrition stats don't tell the story, you are clearly demonstrating your ignorance on the subject. Those stats are everything. They tell you exactly what you are putting into your body and Bimbimbap, clearly is horrible for you, regardless of what your instincts tell you.

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:_vOSht0d3xYJ:www.thestar.com/living/food/article/1252585---healthy-bibimbap-loaded-with-sodium+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca
“Healthy” bibimbap loaded with sodium


By Megan Ogilvie
Health Reporter
9 Comments
Chunks of savoury chicken. A mound of glistening noodles. A neat arrangement of matchstick carrots, zucchini slices, crunchy sprouts and leafy greens, all served on a bed of fluffy white rice. A fried egg on top, the bright yellow yolk still jiggling, and garnished with slices of seaweed.

It could only be a bibimbap.

And this Korean comfort food, which comes steaming in a stone bowl, is one of Casey Elliot’s favourite dishes.

At least twice a month, Elliot heads to Ho Su Bistro, a busy, bustling restaurant on Queen St. W. that offers dozens of menu items, from Korean barbecue to noodle soups to Japanese bento box combos.

“I first went with a friend who used to live in Korea, and she said you couldn’t get a more authentic bibimbap,” Elliot recalls. “After I tried it, I was hooked.”

The substantial meal comes with an appetizer of miso soup and a small lettuce salad.

Elliot asked The Dish to find out how her much-loved bibimbap fared when it came to calories.

“It has a lot of vegetables. In Korea, it’s considered a healthy dish. But you never know …”

The version served at Ho Su Bistro clocks in at 1,183 calories and 30 grams of fat. (Along with the entree, the lab results include the accompanying miso soup and salad, and two tablespoons of chili sauce.)

Elliot sighed when she heard the calorie count.

“I was hoping it would be less, but I’m not surprised,” she said, admitting the meal is extremely filling.

But it’s the 3,328 mg of sodium — 1,000 mg more than the maximum recommended daily allotment — that makes her gasp.

“That’s why it tastes so good!”

Registered dietitian Carol Harrison is equally shocked by the sodium-laced dish. She points out the 3,328 mg is the equivalent to adding 83 shakes of salt to your meal.

“Would you ever stand at home and cook something with so much salt?” she asks. “This is perfect example of why we need menu labelling in restaurants. It’s not fair to leave people in the dark about the sodium content of dishes.”

One easy way to eliminate some sodium in this entree is to skip the appetizers and be very judicious when adding sauce. Harrison says the miso soup and the salad dressing are likely riddled with salt.

“Also, try tasting your food before adding any sauces,” Harrison says. “Add a little sauce, then taste again, and continue until you get to where you enjoy your food. That might be half your usual amount of sauce, or less.”

The meal’s 1,183 calories is more than should be consumed in one sitting. So, as always, Harrison suggests splitting it — either with your dining companion or by taking half home for your next day’s lunch.

And lastly, for those who hate splitting but want to cut out some calories, Harrison recommends asking for less rice in a dish like bibimbap.

“It’s easy for restaurants to pile your plate with rice, and they often give us more than we need. A good rule of thumb is to eat a fist-sized portion of carbohydrates.”

On average, one cup of steamed white rice served at an Asian restaurant contains 210 calories. This particular meal comes with nearly 2 ½ cups of rice.
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KimchiNinja



Joined: 01 May 2012
Location: Gangnam

PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 11:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

byrddogs wrote:
KimchiNinja wrote:
Put another way, when I'm in China there is always some 350lb Amercian woman commenting how unhealthy it is for the elegant Shanghainese woman seated next to her to be eating a chunk of pork belly fat. She probably has some paperwork to intellectually prove her point too.

But results exist.


As a 2 year resident of Shanghai, I'm not buying this at all. I'm not sure where in Shanghai you frequent, but I've never seen (a 350lb American) or heard (anyone telling a local how unhealthy their food choices are publically) anything like that.


Cmon dude, just use common sense instead of being so logical!

I'm talking about the well-known American thing of exclaiming "OH MY GAWD BECKY, THAT IS SO GROSS, THAT CAN'T BE HEALTHY!" whenever a fat chick sees something that is not a frozen fish stick. These people have no problem doing so publically, thus offending all the locals.

Chicken feet, bugs, pork fat, kimchi, cow bone soup, acorn, etc. Even though the Chinese, India, Korean, Japanese woman is in a state of perfect health the fatty will never achieve, the fatty knows better! Very Happy

Example: Shanghai, two months ago, Xintiandi, famous dim sum (I think it is Bla Bla Pearl, can't remember, Black Pearl?), large table with strangers seated around it. Anyhow, American fatty is looking around disgusted "how can you eat that?". Acorn, blah!!! She proceeds to order a whole freakin' duck. The waiter actually stops and is like umm mam, it's very large, 1/2 duck is enough for two, are you sure you want to eat our WHOLE duck!? Fatty gives the waiter a nasty response and proceeds to snarf down a WHOLE DUCK FOR LUNCH. She also complained about everyone at the table smoking.

But yeah, she wouldn't have any of that disgusting acorn the elegant Chinese girls were eating, only peasants eat acorn!!
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KimchiNinja



Joined: 01 May 2012
Location: Gangnam

PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 11:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yagremohbhg wrote:
I mean it's okay and I DO have a favorite Korean dish (Sundooboo chiggae), but come on, it's kinda bland and meat is better not boiled - we all know that much.


Wait a minute...I feel another rant coming to me. Very Happy

Isn't that the whole thing about healthy food; it tastes bland in comparison to greasy/sugary scientifically-created horror foods.

Soondooboo. Some tofu, shrimp, seaweed in some spicy broth. Crack an egg in there if you like, yum! The place down the street advertises their soondoonboo is < 300 calories. Add rice to it in the amount that you need for energy, I usually add enough to make it a 500 calorie meal. $6, no tax, no tip.
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