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The Best Article I've Ever Seen on the Korean Beer Industry
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12ax7



Joined: 07 Nov 2009

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 3:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seoulman69 wrote:

As an aside I've met a lot of Americans claiming that IPA is an American beer and that America saved it from disappearing.


That's simply ignorant. Sure, there is now arguably a distinct American style of IPA (two if you want to be pedantic), but this particular beer originated in the UK in the 18th century and has been brewed continuously since then. The resurgence of interest in this particular style in the US doesn't change that.
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dairyairy



Joined: 17 May 2012
Location: South Korea

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 3:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are choices available in stores that are not available elsewhere. The main "market" in Korea that ends up getting tied to only the top Korean beers is the Korean restaurant industry. In Korea that's big money.
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Chalmers



Joined: 20 Oct 2008

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 4:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dairyairy wrote:
There are choices available in stores that are not available elsewhere. The main "market" in Korea that ends up getting tied to only the top Korean beers is the Korean restaurant industry. In Korea that's big money.


Oh really? Tell us more.
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Chalmers



Joined: 20 Oct 2008

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

12ax7 wrote:
Seoulman69 wrote:

As an aside I've met a lot of Americans claiming that IPA is an American beer and that America saved it from disappearing.


That's simply ignorant. Sure, there is now arguably a distinct American style of IPA (two if you want to be pedantic), but this particular beer originated in the UK in the 18th century and has been brewed continuously since then. The resurgence of interest in this particular style in the US doesn't change that.


It's just too bad British IPA sucks.
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Steelrails



Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Location: Earth, Solar System

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dairyairy wrote:
Quote:
Lastly, according to the article, it said that 95% of beer drinkers in America drank Bud, Miller, or Coors. Well a little math from the article shows that the numbers are almost similar for Koreans when it comes to drinking imports. Imports were about 4% of Korean beer sales and are strongly trending upwards. EMart wouldn't have 3 different foreign beers sitting on the shelves if they didn't think they would sell.



"Bud, Miller, and Coors" applies to many different beers produced by those labels.
Annheuser-Busch alone accounts for a number of brands.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anheuser-Busch_brands


I believe that since Hoegaarden and Budweiser amongst others are bottled domestically in Korea by Hite/OB, they would be included in the domestic production and sales figures for Korea.
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12ax7



Joined: 07 Nov 2009

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 7:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chalmers wrote:
12ax7 wrote:
Seoulman69 wrote:

As an aside I've met a lot of Americans claiming that IPA is an American beer and that America saved it from disappearing.


That's simply ignorant. Sure, there is now arguably a distinct American style of IPA (two if you want to be pedantic), but this particular beer originated in the UK in the 18th century and has been brewed continuously since then. The resurgence of interest in this particular style in the US doesn't change that.


It's just too bad British IPA sucks.


As opposed to what most Americans drink?
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12ax7



Joined: 07 Nov 2009

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steelrails wrote:
dairyairy wrote:
Quote:
Lastly, according to the article, it said that 95% of beer drinkers in America drank Bud, Miller, or Coors. Well a little math from the article shows that the numbers are almost similar for Koreans when it comes to drinking imports. Imports were about 4% of Korean beer sales and are strongly trending upwards. EMart wouldn't have 3 different foreign beers sitting on the shelves if they didn't think they would sell.



"Bud, Miller, and Coors" applies to many different beers produced by those labels.
Annheuser-Busch alone accounts for a number of brands.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anheuser-Busch_brands


I believe that since Hoegaarden and Budweiser amongst others are bottled domestically in Korea by Hite/OB, they would be included in the domestic production and sales figures for Korea.


The fact Hoegaarden and some others (Carlsberg at one point, for example) -which I think we'll all agree are better than Cass, Hite, and OB- are brewed here, sold at a reasonable price, and are relatively popular with local consumers begs the question: Why do they keep coming out with some of the most ridiculous recipes (Cass Red, anyone?)? I think the answer to that question is not taxation but greed. Taxation is just a pretext for putting out the cheapest product the possibly can.
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Adventurer



Joined: 28 Jan 2006

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

12ax7 wrote:
Seoulman69 wrote:

As an aside I've met a lot of Americans claiming that IPA is an American beer and that America saved it from disappearing.


That's simply ignorant. Sure, there is now arguably a distinct American style of IPA (two if you want to be pedantic), but this particular beer originated in the UK in the 18th century and has been brewed continuously since then. The resurgence of interest in this particular style in the US doesn't change that.


Well, some Americans have a false sense of where their beer stands in the world in the eyes of other people. America has some great microbreweries, and some will maybe claim America has the best beer in the world, and they're thinking of the microbreweries and the IPA's that are available. The thing is so many countries don't have so many microbreweries probably because their regular brands are often very good. I mean your average German beer is better than Miller and Budweiser. It may well be that America has the best beers, but I have a problem with people making such a statement. It's rather subjective. However, some of the best beers in the world are definitely found in America.

As far as Indian Pale Ale, it is definitely a UK beer, but the American surge in interest in it has helped make it more popular globally, but it's definitely something borrowed just as regular American beer is pilsner of mostly German origin. A lot of American ale has UK influence. Ale used to be more popular than pilsner. And prohibition made whiskey more popular. Beer almost completely overtook whiskey before that, I heard in a program.
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12ax7



Joined: 07 Nov 2009

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 10:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adventurer wrote:
12ax7 wrote:
Seoulman69 wrote:

As an aside I've met a lot of Americans claiming that IPA is an American beer and that America saved it from disappearing.


That's simply ignorant. Sure, there is now arguably a distinct American style of IPA (two if you want to be pedantic), but this particular beer originated in the UK in the 18th century and has been brewed continuously since then. The resurgence of interest in this particular style in the US doesn't change that.


Well, some Americans have a false sense of where their beer stands in the world in the eyes of other people. America has some great microbreweries, and some will maybe claim America has the best beer in the world, and they're thinking of the microbreweries and the IPA's that are available. The thing is so many countries don't have so many microbreweries probably because their regular brands are often very good. I mean your average German beer is better than Miller and Budweiser. It may well be that America has the best beers, but I have a problem with people making such a statement. It's rather subjective. However, some of the best beers in the world are definitely found in America.

As far as Indian Pale Ale, it is definitely a UK beer, but the American surge in interest in it has helped make it more popular globally, but it's definitely something borrowed just as regular American beer is pilsner of mostly German origin. A lot of American ale has UK influence. Ale used to be more popular than pilsner. And prohibition made whiskey more popular. Beer almost completely overtook whiskey before that, I heard in a program.


This is often referred as the best brewery in the world...and it isn't in the US:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westvleteren_Brewery
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Brooks



Joined: 08 Apr 2003

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 1:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The best beer I have had is when I was in England and Prague.

While Korean beer isn`t good, go to Taiwan or Thailand, where it is even worse.

If you can find a decent selection at Homeplus or E-mart, that is a step in the right direction.
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Seoulman69



Joined: 14 Dec 2009

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 4:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
As far as Indian Pale Ale, it is definitely a UK beer, but the American surge in interest in it has helped make it more popular globally, but it's definitely something borrowed just as regular American beer is pilsner of mostly German origin. A lot of American ale has UK influence. Ale used to be more popular than pilsner. And prohibition made whiskey more popular. Beer almost completely overtook whiskey before that, I heard in a program.


Quote:
That's simply ignorant. Sure, there is now arguably a distinct American style of IPA (two if you want to be pedantic), but this particular beer originated in the UK in the 18th century and has been brewed continuously since then. The resurgence of interest in this particular style in the US doesn't change that.


You lads know your stuff. I'm a fan of the new style of IPA where the move has been from the traditional malty prominence of UK IPA to a more floral and super hoppy new IPA. The ignorance some people show is still disappointing. Speaking of which -

Quote:

It's just too bad British IPA sucks.


Try Jaipur or Punk IPA.
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Adventurer



Joined: 28 Jan 2006

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seoulman69 wrote:
Quote:
As far as Indian Pale Ale, it is definitely a UK beer, but the American surge in interest in it has helped make it more popular globally, but it's definitely something borrowed just as regular American beer is pilsner of mostly German origin. A lot of American ale has UK influence. Ale used to be more popular than pilsner. And prohibition made whiskey more popular. Beer almost completely overtook whiskey before that, I heard in a program.


Quote:
That's simply ignorant. Sure, there is now arguably a distinct American style of IPA (two if you want to be pedantic), but this particular beer originated in the UK in the 18th century and has been brewed continuously since then. The resurgence of interest in this particular style in the US doesn't change that.


You lads know your stuff. I'm a fan of the new style of IPA where the move has been from the traditional malty prominence of UK IPA to a more floral and super hoppy new IPA. The ignorance some people show is still disappointing. Speaking of which -

Quote:

It's just too bad British IPA sucks.


Try Jaipur or Punk IPA.


I believe that IPA's on the West Coast tend to be hoppier than the ones from the East Coast. That has something to do with the availability of hops. In the UK, they would focus more on the wheaty, malty taste as you said, and that's true to some extent on the American East Coast.
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kcmo



Joined: 24 Nov 2011

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 11:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey I've been reading this thread and I need to put in my 2 cents about the USA's world beer standing. They are definitely the best beer country in the world, without a shadow of doubt. Sure, the macro stuff there is awful and the macro stuff in other European countries is comparably better, but.........Germany, Belgium, England and even Ireland tend to limit themselves to certain traditional styles. German brewers stick to only making German styles, Belgian brewers only make Belgian styles, etc... The American breweries make every style and there are hundreds of breweries there that produce many different styles and do an excellent job at all of them. Breweries like Dogfish Head, Sierra Nevada, Alesmith, North Coast, Bells, etc... make literally EVERY style. I guess what I am saying is that the enormously wide variation of beer in the USA is unparalled by any country, which in my opinion makes it the best beer country.
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PatrickGHBusan



Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Location: Busan (1997-2008) Canada 2008 -

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 12:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sure the US is great if you like your beer with a 2-3% alcool content. Wink
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Adventurer



Joined: 28 Jan 2006

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kcmo wrote:
Hey I've been reading this thread and I need to put in my 2 cents about the USA's world beer standing. They are definitely the best beer country in the world, without a shadow of doubt. Sure, the macro stuff there is awful and the macro stuff in other European countries is comparably better, but.........Germany, Belgium, England and even Ireland tend to limit themselves to certain traditional styles. German brewers stick to only making German styles, Belgian brewers only make Belgian styles, etc... The American breweries make every style and there are hundreds of breweries there that produce many different styles and do an excellent job at all of them. Breweries like Dogfish Head, Sierra Nevada, Alesmith, North Coast, Bells, etc... make literally EVERY style. I guess what I am saying is that the enormously wide variation of beer in the USA is unparalled by any country, which in my opinion makes it the best beer country.


I understand what you're saying, but that's only a minority of the beer consumed in the U.S. So you could say most of the beer in many European countries is definitely better than most of the beer in the U.S.
Yes, you can get great flavors in the U.S., and the many beer masters are very creative, but they have had to because the regular beer is not so good, and we have a more open economic system in the US when compared to a place like Korea. Many of Europeans haven't really felt the need to come up with so many microbreweries because they enjoyed what they had. I don't know if you could say the microbreweries are better than everything in Belgium. It gets hard once you have very excellent beers to really compare them. Comparing two excellent beers is not so simple. You can like two different excellent beers for different reasons without saying one is better than the other. It is safe to say that the US has more variety. I love Sierra Nevada. I've had it before. I like the fact that America has a lot of that said variety, but it's hard to say it has the best beer in the world. It has some of the best beer. It has improved leaps and bounds when compared to even the 1990 or something. You didn't have much of a choice back then in comparison to today.
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