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Learning Korean lang without going to class, can it be done?
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itiswhatitis



Joined: 08 Aug 2011

PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 6:18 am    Post subject: Learning Korean lang without going to class, can it be done? Reply with quote

My Korean is fairly basic and I've taken some classes.

Has anyone ever learned Korean without going to language classes? Of course I would use a program like Rosetta Stone at home and I would be creative with creating study materials for myself. I would also meet with a Korean study partner from time to time for conversation.

I'm able to dicipline myself to study so that isn't a problem. I just wonder if attending classes is really necessary.

Thanks!!!
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AbbeFaria



Joined: 17 May 2005
Location: Gangnam

PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can find the books and study on your own, sure. The only problem I had with that is there was no one to reliably ask questions to. You can use Korean friends occasionally but I never wanted to become a pain in the ass with it. Korean grammar is very tricky and having someone to go over it with you is invaluable. Plus there's the accent to sort out.

You can do it but I found it to be much slower. If you're serious then it's worth it to either find a private tutor that has experience or go to a class.
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jammo



Joined: 12 Dec 2008

PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This question is too vague to answer. Do you have an actual study plan?
What is your level?

Maybe if you give us more info we can give some actual advice


EDIT*** Delete Rosetta Stone
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young_clinton



Joined: 09 Sep 2009

PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 1:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Before Rosetta Stone I would use Pimsleur Comprehensive I and II which for a reasonable fee can be legally downloaded online. This depends upon the level of Korean you already know. Pimsleur is really good as an introduction to Korean grammer as well as providing some vocabulary also. Pimsleur and Rosetta Stone Level I, II, and III tend to overlap just a little bit, but Rosetta Stone is a lot more comprehensive than what Pimsleur deals with. Rosetta Stone deals with more complex grammer patterns.

Before spending the money on Pimsleur and Rosetta Stone you may want to look online first. There is a huge amount of Korean language lessons online that are free. Another thing I have been told that much of the language they use in Rosetta Stone is not necessarily spoken or used by Koreans. The Korean language in South Korea is rapidly transforming for various reasons. It's transforming so fast that North Koreans have a real hard time following what South Koreans speak. It's close to being a seperate language.

How and where to learn Korean has been discussed a huge amount of time on the Korean forums fairly recently. Due a search for it on the Korean forums and you will get lots of ideas on where to go, either universities or online, to learn Korean.
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jonpurdy



Joined: 08 Jan 2009
Location: Ulsan

PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you are disciplined enough to study multiple times per week and brave enough to use everything you've learned all the time then it's certainly possible. Class does give you the opportunity to immediately practice what you've learned with immediate verbal feedback.
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Kepler



Joined: 24 Sep 2007

PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 5:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It has been done. There was a guy that lived in a goshiwon for three months and studied Korean for fifteen hours a day.
http://forums.eslcafe.com/korea/viewtopic.php?p=2312657
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some waygug-in



Joined: 25 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 8:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

young_clinton wrote:
Before Rosetta Stone I would use Pimsleur Comprehensive I and II which for a reasonable fee can be legally downloaded online. This depends upon the level of Korean you already know. Pimsleur is really good as an introduction to Korean grammer as well as providing some vocabulary also. Pimsleur and Rosetta Stone Level I, II, and III tend to overlap just a little bit, but Rosetta Stone is a lot more comprehensive than what Pimsleur deals with. Rosetta Stone deals with more complex grammer patterns.

Before spending the money on Pimsleur and Rosetta Stone you may want to look online first. There is a huge amount of Korean language lessons online that are free. Another thing I have been told that much of the language they use in Rosetta Stone is not necessarily spoken or used by Koreans. The Korean language in South Korea is rapidly transforming for various reasons. It's transforming so fast that North Koreans have a real hard time following what South Koreans speak. It's close to being a seperate language.

How and where to learn Korean has been discussed a huge amount of time on the Korean forums fairly recently. Due a search for it on the Korean forums and you will get lots of ideas on where to go, either universities or online, to learn Korean.



I am curious as to your thoughts on the Pimsleur course. I tried using the

little intro course they had back in 2003 and found it next to useless.

The reasons being;

a) they had chosen someone with a very strong lisp
or something to be the example of a native Korean speaker. It was so
annoying to listen to, I couldn't stand it for very long,

b) the language they used was very old (I was told it was about 50 years
behind modern usage) as such it didn't do much to prepare me for what
I faced daily.

c) At that time there were no higher levels, so I couldn't do anything but the very basic course. I was so put off by it that I didn't persue Pimsleur
any further.


I am wondering if they have addressed these issues and also I wonder
if you believe the courses they offer are worth the money.
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sirius black



Joined: 04 Jun 2010

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would say yes. But it depends on what you mean by classes. You'd have to learn the alphabet somewhere. You can't pick that up from basic conversation.

But its possible to learn the spoken language without classes, same as how millions of immigrants learn english in America for the last couople hundred years without going to classes. They assimilate and make an effort.

Also, lots depends on your learning style. Some people grasp languages easily. They hear it and can discern the nuances. Others need a more formal approach, so I would say it depends on your learning style as well.

Anyway, generally speaking, the answer is yes. It would probably require a certain amount immersion, close to full immersion into the culture and people.
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schwa



Joined: 18 Jan 2003
Location: sokcho

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I personally know a number of foreigners who have become nearly fluent without formal classes. (I'm not one of them.) In every case, they had a Korean SO they could constantly question about the language. Without that, or a classroom equivalent, Korean is a tough hill.
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Unibrow



Joined: 20 Aug 2012

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I generally study for a few hours every day and see a private tutor every week. I practice with my friends too learning small words and phrases but i use the tutor to help me with grammar and stuff, i dont want to bother with that when im out drinking
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mithridates



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Location: President's office, Korean Space Agency

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kepler wrote:
It has been done. There was a guy that lived in a goshiwon for three months and studied Korean for fifteen hours a day.
http://forums.eslcafe.com/korea/viewtopic.php?p=2312657


That's me. There was about a year of preparation beforehand and knowing Japanese beforehand helped a lot though. For someone starting with an English-only (or Romance, Germanic or other less than helpful language) background it would probably take about a year working that hard.

There's a guy named Benny Lewis with a blog who learns languages to half fluency over a few months and his progress with Chinese over three months shows about how fluent one can get in that amount of time (about B-1). If he had done the same for another nine months or so he would have been fluent but he stopped and switched to another language a few months later. He also spent too much time blogging about studying the language and responding to comments.
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Psilo



Joined: 25 Nov 2012

PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 3:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been using Pimsleur's Korean I and II and it's been awesome and really fun all the way through so far. I just finished the first 30 lessons which is 15 hours worth and the complete Korean I pack, so now I'm moving onto Korean II and I can't wait. I can hold a conversation with Koreans who don't speak much english as long as they don't talk overly fast. It has taught me everything from asking directions to ordering everything at a restaurant or bar among many other things, all within 15 hours.

I recommend Pimsleur over Rosetta Stone bigtime... there isn't even a comparison, Pimsleur is what you want and what everyone should use before even having a thought about the lackluster program that is Rosetta.
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young_clinton



Joined: 09 Sep 2009

PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 6:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

some waygug-in wrote:


a) they had chosen someone with a very strong lisp
or something to be the example of a native Korean speaker. It was so
annoying to listen to, I couldn't stand it for very long,



I noticed the older versions are less dynamic. I wouldn't have liked them either. I never noticed any lisp on mine though.

some waygug-in wrote:


b) the language they used was very old (I was told it was about 50 years
behind modern usage) as such it didn't do much to prepare me for what
I faced daily.

The new Pimsleur Korean is a little less archaic, but still uses a lot of old stuff. The comprehensive Pimsleur Korean I&II are not comprehensive enough, so yours was probably absolutely worthless.


some waygug-in wrote:



I am wondering if they have addressed these issues and also I wonder
if you believe the courses they offer are worth the money.


The course are good as a simple introduction to the way the Korean language works, the grammer, some vocabulary (500 words) etc. You won't even come close to speaking Korean with the courses. The courses are a decent starting point though and have some interesting language in them. Once you complete the courses there are plenty of other online free courses you can work on.

A very short portion of the Pimsleur comprehensive tapes teach Korean writing. It is short but it is very good for learning how Korean writing works and how to speak it.

They are now half the price that I paid for them. You can buy and download the comprehensive courses online a little portion at a time or the full set. Of course you don't want to buy the CD's and have them sent at the ridiculously high price that they sell them for. You wouldn't want to carry those things around anyway.
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young_clinton



Joined: 09 Sep 2009

PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 7:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Psilo wrote:


I recommend Pimsleur over Rosetta Stone bigtime... there isn't even a comparison, Pimsleur is what you want and what everyone should use before even having a thought about the lackluster program that is Rosetta.


I would do Pimsleur before I starting the Rosetta Stone I, II & III. The two overlap quite a bit, but Rosetta Stone is more comprehensive and better than Pimsleur , if you are patient enough to do thier system. You have to be patient for Rosetta Stone, very patient.


Last edited by young_clinton on Tue Jan 08, 2013 5:41 am; edited 1 time in total
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some waygug-in



Joined: 25 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

young_clinton wrote:


The course are good as a simple introduction to the way the Korean language works, the grammer, some vocabulary (500 words) etc. You won't even come close to speaking Korean with the courses. The courses are a decent starting point though and have some interesting language in them. Once you complete the courses there are plenty of other online free courses you can work on.

A very short portion of the Pimsleur comprehensive tapes teach Korean writing. It is short but it is very good for learning how Korean writing works and how to speak it.

They are now half the price that I paid for them. You can buy and download the comprehensive courses online a little portion at a time or the full set. Of course you don't want to buy the CD's and have them sent at the ridiculously high price that they sell them for. You wouldn't want to carry those things around anyway.


thanks for your detailed response. I did a lot of studying with the free

on-line courses as well as private tutors since then. I don't know if I would learn anything new from Pimsleur , unless they were to offer an
intermediate level.
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