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Has moving away from Korea worked out for you?
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some waygug-in



Joined: 25 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So far, yes and no.

I moved back to Canada 3 years ago. Through contacts with my church I

was lucky to get a job right away. The job turned out to be steady

and I went ahead and got a mortgage for a small house.

So financially, I guess it's successful.

Careerwise, I miss EFL, I miss Korea and I miss the freedom

I had there.

But I don't miss all the negatives that go along with working there.

Not a bit.
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NilesQ



Joined: 27 Nov 2006

PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Went back to Canada in 2008 to take a unique technical programme at a college near Toronto. Hired off of my co-op placement and have progressed through two other jobs with different companies. I now hold a manager level job in my field with one of the largest retailers in Canada. Money is OK. I make $75,000/year with benefits plus a profit sharing bonus. I was making about that much in my last year in Korea due to privates and it was tax free, but had no benefits or upward mobility.

There is a lot of work in Canada for anyone who trains in a field that's a little off the beaten path, or in skilled trades. If I could do it all over again, I'd become a pipefitter!

My time in Korea was awesome. I was 22, it was my first job and foreign experience. I will remember it fondly for the rest of my life. However, it can never be recaptured. I left because I was just trying to relive my first 6 months in Korea for several years. It's done. Time to move on. Glad I did.
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maitaidads



Joined: 08 Oct 2012

PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 12:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[/quote]
A lot of positive experiences mentioned on this thread, but kind of short on specifics.

Also, I'm surprised there's not more entreprenuership mentioned on here. Didn't anyone come back from Korea with enough money to work for themselves, or start a business?[/quote]

I am American; employers seem to love the Korea angle; they also just hired a guy here as a media buyer who spent 2011 in Korea.

As for the entrepreneurship, i gave that a shot my first time home with the meager savings i had and bottomed out pretty quick.
I got lucky the second time going home, but i think it was worth the risk.
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Died By Bear



Joined: 13 Jul 2010
Location: On the big lake they call Gitche Gumee

PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 1:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

By far the best thing about living and working back home for me is that I don't feel angry all the time because I can't control most situations like in Korea. And by that I mean all of the situations that put you at a disadvantage because you're not Korean or you don't speak fluently. Like the time that jerk told the cops that I scraped his car with my motorcycle when I knew I hadn't. No matter what you do in some situations, you lose in Korea because you're not Korean.

There are tons of things that I miss though, good things about Korea and Japan. They're good to visit, but to depend on them for a paycheck? Forget it.
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Weigookin74



Joined: 26 Oct 2009

PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2013 2:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

maitaidads wrote:

A lot of positive experiences mentioned on this thread, but kind of short on specifics.

Also, I'm surprised there's not more entreprenuership mentioned on here. Didn't anyone come back from Korea with enough money to work for themselves, or start a business?[/quote]

I am American; employers seem to love the Korea angle; they also just hired a guy here as a media buyer who spent 2011 in Korea.

[/quote]

Care to elaborate about employers loving the Korea angle? I've always heard they don't really care about it. What are the experiences of those who have gone back?
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Weigookin74



Joined: 26 Oct 2009

PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2013 2:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NilesQ wrote:
Went back to Canada in 2008 to take a unique technical programme at a college near Toronto. Hired off of my co-op placement and have progressed through two other jobs with different companies. I now hold a manager level job in my field with one of the largest retailers in Canada. Money is OK. I make $75,000/year with benefits plus a profit sharing bonus. I was making about that much in my last year in Korea due to privates and it was tax free, but had no benefits or upward mobility.

There is a lot of work in Canada for anyone who trains in a field that's a little off the beaten path, or in skilled trades. If I could do it all over again, I'd become a pipefitter!

My time in Korea was awesome. I was 22, it was my first job and foreign experience. I will remember it fondly for the rest of my life. However, it can never be recaptured. I left because I was just trying to relive my first 6 months in Korea for several years. It's done. Time to move on. Glad I did.


What trades or off the beaten path jobs are most in demand now?
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rabidcake



Joined: 10 Aug 2009

PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2013 3:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Died By Bear wrote:
By far the best thing about living and working back home for me is that I don't feel angry all the time because I can't control most situations like in Korea. And by that I mean all of the situations that put you at a disadvantage because you're not Korean or you don't speak fluently. Like the time that jerk told the cops that I scraped his car with my motorcycle when I knew I hadn't. No matter what you do in some situations, you lose in Korea because you're not Korean.

There are tons of things that I miss though, good things about Korea and Japan. They're good to visit, but to depend on them for a paycheck? Forget it.


Yeah, if you have amazing Korean skills you can defend yourself like an equal, but if not then you really are at a bit of a disadvantage
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NilesQ



Joined: 27 Nov 2006

PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2013 6:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Weigookin74 wrote:
NilesQ wrote:
Went back to Canada in 2008 to take a unique technical programme at a college near Toronto. Hired off of my co-op placement and have progressed through two other jobs with different companies. I now hold a manager level job in my field with one of the largest retailers in Canada. Money is OK. I make $75,000/year with benefits plus a profit sharing bonus. I was making about that much in my last year in Korea due to privates and it was tax free, but had no benefits or upward mobility.

There is a lot of work in Canada for anyone who trains in a field that's a little off the beaten path, or in skilled trades. If I could do it all over again, I'd become a pipefitter!

My time in Korea was awesome. I was 22, it was my first job and foreign experience. I will remember it fondly for the rest of my life. However, it can never be recaptured. I left because I was just trying to relive my first 6 months in Korea for several years. It's done. Time to move on. Glad I did.


What trades or off the beaten path jobs are most in demand now?



By "off the beaten path", I mean things that aren't widely studied or available at mosrt schools. There's a school in Fort McMurray that has a 1 month course to learn to drive Caterpillar 797 Haul trucks. They are the biggest trucks on Eatrh. You only need a regular drivers license to operate one, and Keyano College is the only place in Canada to train on them privately. That seems like a winner to me - in demand job, very few places to train in it.

If I were coming back to Canada today, I'd go to Alberta and learn a skilled trade like pipefitting, welding, electrician, or some petroleum engineering course at a college. Lots of good jobs in that field that pay well.

Non Destructive Testing (NDT) is an interesting job that is quite technical and in demand these days as well.

I searched college websites until I found an interesting program, related to a large industry, with few schools offering training.
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I'm With You



Joined: 01 Sep 2011

PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2013 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Died By Bear wrote:
By far the best thing about living and working back home for me is that I don't feel angry all the time because I can't control most situations like in Korea.

There are tons of things that I miss though, good things about Korea and Japan. They're good to visit, but to depend on them for a paycheck? Forget it.


I agree with your first point. Even after years of living here it's easy to come unglued dealing with stuff like that.

But when I do, I just start thinking about my bank account and my heart rate starts to go down. I'm earning ~$75,000 a year now teaching 12 hours a week at a university and privates. I'mm working 8 months a year. The other 4 months are mine for the most part during the winter and summer vacations, minus some meetings and other events.

But to go back home to a 9-5 job? With a real boss?

Forget it.


Last edited by I'm With You on Wed Jan 09, 2013 10:47 am; edited 1 time in total
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I'm With You



Joined: 01 Sep 2011

PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2013 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

some waygug-in wrote:
Careerwise, I miss EFL, I miss Korea and I miss the freedom I had there.


Do you miss enough that you find yourself considering returning?

I did. I went back but soon grew tired of work predominating my life. Since coming back to EFL I've had way more time to myself to do the things I want. And I'm actually earning more money than I was back home.

I suppose the EFL lifestyle can be addictive for some. And the comment above about some people trying to re-live their first year or so could be an issue for many people. You're right, It's impossible to do.
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some waygug-in



Joined: 25 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2013 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep, I consider returning a lot, especially when winter hits.

But I threw away my passport, all my docs and then bought a house to

make sure I didn't.
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I'm With You



Joined: 01 Sep 2011

PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2013 3:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

some waygug-in wrote:
Yep, I consider returning a lot, especially when winter hits.

But I threw away my passport, all my docs and then bought a house to

make sure I didn't.


Seriously? That's hilarious. But you were smart enough to know that you needed to commit to make it work and that's a step in the right direction.

Looking back at it now, I suppose I went back with probably the wrong mind-set and wasn't committed enough to make it work. I always knew I could go back to EFL and, specifically, back to a university teaching position if I wanted. Which meant more free time and long vacations.

Right, winter sucked. 2 things that I struggled with when I went back were poor public transportation and winters that were long and extremely cold.
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lemak



Joined: 02 Jan 2011

PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2013 7:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Died By Bear wrote:
By far the best thing about living and working back home for me is that I don't feel angry all the time


Yeah, I hear you. I kid you not, my blood pressure came down 30 points since leaving Korea.
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Zyzyfer



Joined: 29 Jan 2003
Location: who, what, where, when, why, how?

PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2013 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

lemak wrote:
Died By Bear wrote:
By far the best thing about living and working back home for me is that I don't feel angry all the time


Yeah, I hear you. I kid you not, my blood pressure came down 30 points since leaving Korea.


Shocked Shocked Shocked
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young_clinton



Joined: 09 Sep 2009

PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2013 5:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Be very careful about quitting your decent Korean Native English teaching job for greener pastures. Because I haven't seen any yet and it might be difficult to get back to Korea.
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