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Immigration Blackmarks.

 
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Skippy



Joined: 18 Jan 2003
Location: Daejeon

PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2013 11:44 pm    Post subject: Immigration Blackmarks. Reply with quote

The immigration blackmark is a record of immigration misdeeds a foreigner has done. A supposed mark in a file staining a foreigners life.

Some supposed offenses.
Leaving later then the date stated on the ARC.
Not registering with immigration for an ARC.
Not informing immigration of changes like passport, address, work, etc.
Working illegally.

Now with having a blackmark. It is said that immigration can make life difficult for you. Two ways I have heard that immigration can enforce. First is refusing a visa. Second having the visa applicant do a home country consulate interview. Which can get expensive and time consuming.

Know with the above info Immigration blackmarks are said to exist. Yet, I really do not know of anybody personally that has been hampered by one of these blackmarks. Really! Don't.

So the question what have the people here on Dave's ESL cafe heard about or seen happen concerning blackmarks. Please tell us your woes or a friend of friends horror story.

I ask because, recently a friend of mine got into trouble with immigration. The amazing part is my friend was a bit of a moron, which surprises me as he seems so smart and capable. After a couple of bad issues with a school he worked with. For example going to Japan for a visa and not getting the visa issuance number. So he finally got the job and visa done. Then he did not register for his ARC card before the 90 days! He said his boss would handle that or what ever.
About a month or two ago he left the country (quit or trip?) and got fined by the immigration. Think he was able to get it down to about 150k won.

The friend is now back home and looking for a job. He has some leads and help from other friends. I am confident he will find something. Yet, I have discussed with/argued with other people that the friend might not be able to come back easily because of his blackmark.

So what's o you think people?
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Zyzyfer



Joined: 29 Jan 2003
Location: who, what, where, when, why, how?

PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2013 12:03 am    Post subject: Re: Immigration Blackmarks. Reply with quote

Skippy wrote:
The immigration blackmark is a record of immigration misdeeds a foreigner has done. A supposed mark in a file staining a foreigners life.

Some supposed offenses.
Leaving later then the date stated on the ARC.
Not registering with immigration for an ARC.
Not informing immigration of changes like passport, address, work, etc.
Working illegally.

Now with having a blackmark. It is said that immigration can make life difficult for you. Two ways I have heard that immigration can enforce. First is refusing a visa. Second having the visa applicant do a home country consulate interview. Which can get expensive and time consuming.

Know with the above info Immigration blackmarks are said to exist. Yet, I really do not know of anybody personally that has been hampered by one of these blackmarks. Really! Don't.

So the question what have the people here on Dave's ESL cafe heard about or seen happen concerning blackmarks. Please tell us your woes or a friend of friends horror story.

I ask because, recently a friend of mine got into trouble with immigration. The amazing part is my friend was a bit of a moron, which surprises me as he seems so smart and capable. After a couple of bad issues with a school he worked with. For example going to Japan for a visa and not getting the visa issuance number. So he finally got the job and visa done. Then he did not register for his ARC card before the 90 days! He said his boss would handle that or what ever.
About a month or two ago he left the country (quit or trip?) and got fined by the immigration. Think he was able to get it down to about 150k won.

The friend is now back home and looking for a job. He has some leads and help from other friends. I am confident he will find something. Yet, I have discussed with/argued with other people that the friend might not be able to come back easily because of his blackmark.

So what's o you think people?


I've got two black marks for overstays. It's funny because one is actually immigration's fault; way back when I was on my first contract in 2001-2002, I extended my contract by one month and they didn't note this on the ARC. The other is quite minor (five days) but I was, sadly, partially at fault.

Anyway the cause or who is actually at fault doesn't matter. The marks were still there when I briefly went back to teaching in 2009. I was in Korea at the time, and yet I was told I would have to do a consulate interview back in the US.

Now...having lived in Korea from 2001 to 2009, you can probably imagine just how dumb the consulate interview was. It only took a few seconds for me to get the point across about my experience. Just ended up being an informal chat with the guy doing the interview.

As for your friend, my guess is that immigration only wants to ban people for serious offenses like working illegally or extreme overstays. Doubt that forgetting to get your ARC falls in that category.

That said, a lot has changed since my experience in 2009. I don't even know if consulate interviews at home are required anymore for people with black marks. Such an "offense" may end up leading to nothing at all for all I know. I mainly posted to share my experience, good luck to your friend, being back home certainly eases potential travel expenses at the very least.
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ttompatz



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Location: Kwangju, South Korea

PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2013 1:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have first hand knowledge of several people (some of whom were on this board) who have immigration offenses.

In each of their cases they were required to return to their home country for a consular interview to obtain a new visa (E2, E7, D7).

If he is applying from home then no worry. He can do the consular interview when he applies for his visa.

The problem would arise when he wants to change his visa or obtain a new visa. That flight home for a 5 minute interview to obtain a new visa is expensive.

.
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Zyzyfer



Joined: 29 Jan 2003
Location: who, what, where, when, why, how?

PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ttompatz wrote:
In each of their cases they were required to return to their home country for a consular interview to obtain a new visa (E2, E7, D7).


Heh. I was under the impression that the E-7 was safe from the consular interview based on my own experiences but I guess not.

Do you know if it's a one-time consular interview? I was under the impression that it was recurring but this was back in 2009 and quite a few things have changed since that time.
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ttompatz



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Location: Kwangju, South Korea

PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zyzyfer wrote:
ttompatz wrote:
In each of their cases they were required to return to their home country for a consular interview to obtain a new visa (E2, E7, D7).


Heh. I was under the impression that the E-7 was safe from the consular interview based on my own experiences but I guess not.

Do you know if it's a one-time consular interview? I was under the impression that it was recurring but this was back in 2009 and quite a few things have changed since that time.


To my understanding and knowledge it is still:
- a recurring event (every time you change your visa to a new visa)
- possibly not for a transfer of your visa to a new employer
- a change to a D10 has never been tested (to my knowledge) by someone with a blackmark so there is no information.

.
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