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Can an introverted person succeed as a teacher?
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roro1990



Joined: 31 Dec 2013

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 11:12 am    Post subject: Can an introverted person succeed as a teacher? Reply with quote

Hi, I'm stuck in a bit of a rut at the minute at home after graduating college. I'm not sure exactly where I wanna go in life. One thing I do love though is experiencing new cultures, so I've been thinking about teaching in Korea for a year. Problem is, i'm quite a shy guy and this is holding me back from actually doing it. My question is, can a shy guy succeed in this job? Also, without a TEFL, is the actual process of teaching difficult? I've heard in some places its little more than reading out to a class from a book.
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bucheon bum



Joined: 16 Jan 2003
Location: DC area

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not to quibble, but shy is not the same as introverted. Some of the most outgoing people are introverted. Some of the most shy people are extroverted. If you get worn out by being around a large number of people, then yes, you are an introvert. If you get energized by being around people, then you are an extrovert. I'm oversimplying it, but you get the idea.

Also, there are different levels of shyness.

Regardless, confidence is important. Or at least being able to project it Smile.

But to answer your question: yes, shy people can be certainly do well.
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roro1990



Joined: 31 Dec 2013

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 1:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bucheon bum wrote:
Not to quibble, but shy is not the same as introverted. Some of the most outgoing people are introverted. Some of the most shy people are extroverted. If you get worn out by being around a large number of people, then yes, you are an introvert. If you get energized by being around people, then you are an extrovert. I'm oversimplying it, but you get the idea.

Also, there are different levels of shyness.

Regardless, confidence is important. Or at least being able to project it Smile.

But to answer your question: yes, shy people can be certainly do well.


Well I'd say I am a bit of both. I can feel energized around people but sometimes drained and want my own company. I'm definetely shy though. And is any real skill required to teach or is it generally just read books and play games?
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archaeologist5



Joined: 25 Dec 2013

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
And is any real skill required to teach or is it generally just read books and play games?


I put the words in bold that make me question your ability to be a teacher. I do not care about your shyness but those few words tell everyone that you are not qualified to teach.

There is a lot of skill involved, from teaching the right material to classroom management. I would suggest you do some research on teaching itself and learn a few things before applying to work in Korea.
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roro1990



Joined: 31 Dec 2013

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 3:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

archaeologist5 wrote:
Quote:
And is any real skill required to teach or is it generally just read books and play games?


I put the words in bold that make me question your ability to be a teacher. I do not care about your shyness but those few words tell everyone that you are not qualified to teach.

There is a lot of skill involved, from teaching the right material to classroom management. I would suggest you do some research on teaching itself and learn a few things before applying to work in Korea.


It's a legitimate question. I stumbled across a blog post recently basically describing the whole teaching English scene in Korea. He said he never took a TEFL and found it extremely easy. This from a guy who had been there 10 years. He said you're given material with which to teach with. I was just skeptical it was that easy to make (and save) good money whilst immersing myself in a new culture, hence my post.
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archaeologist5



Joined: 25 Dec 2013

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

roro1990 wrote:


It's a legitimate question. I stumbled across a blog post recently basically describing the whole teaching English scene in Korea. He said he never took a TEFL and found it extremely easy. This from a guy who had been there 10 years. He said you're given material with which to teach with. I was just skeptical it was that easy to make (and save) good money whilst immersing myself in a new culture, hence my post.


Okay since it is a legitimate question here is the long answer:

You really do not need a TEFL, CELTA or even a Teacher's diploma to be able to teach. Some people are just gifted teachers. Other people do need the training to learn how to do it correctly.

To be a good teacher, you need to develop skills. Anybody can go in front of a class and claim to 'teach' whether they are teaching or not is suspect.

Inter-personal skills would be one that comes to mind because you are interacting with other people. Another is judging what the students need to learn and separate that from the fun and games' material that does nothing but pass the time.

Then you should learn how to tell the difference between good and bad material or if the material taught is actually beneficial to the student or not.

Some people are given material to teach but the problem there is, many of the students have already been taught it and they will get bored. So you need skill in knowing which material to move on to to help the students learn.

In Korea some hagwons and schools do not care about all that but then they are not looking for a good teacher. It all depends on if you want to be a good teacher or not and if you are willing to put up with the flack from Koreans who want something different.
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rainman3277



Joined: 13 Sep 2009

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

archaeologist5 wrote:
roro1990 wrote:


It's a legitimate question. I stumbled across a blog post recently basically describing the whole teaching English scene in Korea. He said he never took a TEFL and found it extremely easy. This from a guy who had been there 10 years. He said you're given material with which to teach with. I was just skeptical it was that easy to make (and save) good money whilst immersing myself in a new culture, hence my post.


Okay since it is a legitimate question here is the long answer:

You really do not need a TEFL, CELTA or even a Teacher's diploma to be able to teach. Some people are just gifted teachers. Other people do need the training to learn how to do it correctly.

To be a good teacher, you need to develop skills. Anybody can go in front of a class and claim to 'teach' whether they are teaching or not is suspect.

Inter-personal skills would be one that comes to mind because you are interacting with other people. Another is judging what the students need to learn and separate that from the fun and games' material that does nothing but pass the time.

Then you should learn how to tell the difference between good and bad material or if the material taught is actually beneficial to the student or not.

Some people are given material to teach but the problem there is, many of the students have already been taught it and they will get bored. So you need skill in knowing which material to move on to to help the students learn.

In Korea some hagwons and schools do not care about all that but then they are not looking for a good teacher. It all depends on if you want to be a good teacher or not and if you are willing to put up with the flack from Koreans who want something different.


EFFORT and common sense is all you need. Best ESL teachers I know have no TEFL, CELTA or teachers diploma. It doesn't hurt, but totally unneccessary to teach ESL. If you are willing to commit to doing your job well, the rest doesn't matter. If you want to cruise along doing jack-all and collect a paycheck, you'll probably hate it and become alienated from your school and korean coworkers. shy or outgoing, if you do your best there is a place for you Smile.
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edwardcatflap



Joined: 22 Mar 2009

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 4:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Best ESL teachers I know have no TEFL, CELTA or teachers diploma.


It always amuses me when people come out with this line. Nearly always people without any qualifications themselves. How do they know whether these people they know are good teachers or not? How many of their classes have they observed? Have they had any training themselves to be able to decide whether a teacher is good or not? Or are they just basing it on people who go round talking the talk and who seem to be popular with the kids? How do they know these great teachers they know wouldn't be even better with a qualification? Any teacher worth his/her salt IMO is interested in self development and wouldn't be arrogant enough to think they wouldn't get any from a training course.
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happiness



Joined: 04 Sep 2010

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shy is not the same as introverted. Im rather introverted, but my classes have always been popular and full of kids to adults. I just need the downtown afterwards.

I have read about shy people having problems over here with their schools, so Id think about that.

I have no official qualifications either. T+U...
Im all about self improvment, but (not just) Korea is all about more than that.
Its about fitting in and working in their system.
All kinds of degree'd people come here and demand this or that.
You see it on this board all the time.

Fitting in and understanding your students needs is quite important.
Then you can experiment with methods.
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edwardcatflap



Joined: 22 Mar 2009

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 5:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I have no official qualifications either. T+U...
Im all about self improvment, but (not just) Korea is all about more than that.
Its about fitting in and working in their system.
All kinds of degree'd people come here and demand this or that.
You see it on this board all the time.

Fitting in and understanding your students needs is quite important.
Then you can experiment with methods.


True
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son of coco



Joined: 14 Mar 2008

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

archaeologist5 wrote:
Quote:
And is any real skill required to teach or is it generally just read books and play games?


I put the words in bold that make me question your ability to be a teacher. I do not care about your shyness but those few words tell everyone that you are not qualified to teach.

There is a lot of skill involved, from teaching the right material to classroom management. I would suggest you do some research on teaching itself and learn a few things before applying to work in Korea.


Ignore this mate. Some language teachers like to pretend they're cancer specialists. There is some skill involved, yes, but being able to relate to people goes a long way too. Nobody is an expert when they start, and if Korea is offering jobs to people with no experience then it's a good place to get started.

As long as you have an interest in actually becoming better at teaching as you go along then you'll be ok. If you are the greatest English teacher the world has ever seen then your skills will probably be wasted in a Korean hagwon/public school.
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archaeologist5



Joined: 25 Dec 2013

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

son of coco wrote:


Ignore this mate. Some language teachers like to pretend they're cancer specialists. There is some skill involved, yes, but being able to relate to people goes a long way too. Nobody is an expert when they start, and if Korea is offering jobs to people with no experience then it's a good place to get started.

As long as you have an interest in actually becoming better at teaching as you go along then you'll be ok. If you are the greatest English teacher the world has ever seen then your skills will probably be wasted in a Korean hagwon/public school.


The bold words apply to that person's post as well. Everything I have said comes form the desire to be a good teacher. Koreans do appreciate good English teachers contrary to that poster's words.

There is a lot of skill involved especially if you have to deal with 30-40 students in one class. Koreans and Korean students are not dumb, they know the difference between a good teacher who cares and one who is wasting their time.

There was an observation told me once, I am being general on purpose, and it went like this: "If the Korean student thinks they know English better than the Westerner, then they will stop listening to the western teacher."
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World Traveler



Joined: 29 May 2009

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

True. Also, so many Korean students are rude and disrepectful that controling them is almost impossible unless you are doing an amazing job teaching. Interesting well prepared lessons is one way to engage a large class room of inattentive uncooperative students (who don't want to be there).
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young_clinton



Joined: 09 Sep 2009

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Where do these posts come from? Why wouldn't they be able to survive as teachers or be good teachers.
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Who's Your Daddy?



Joined: 30 May 2010
Location: The joy's in the ride.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Introverted is no problem. I'd say you need to be friendly, comfortable meeting new people, relaxed enough to follow silly rules, and have a thick enough skin that the bad students and bad management don't get you down.
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