Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Korean Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Public pool supervision / lack thereof
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> General Discussion Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Steelrails



Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Location: Earth, Solar System

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Captain Corea wrote:
Steelrails wrote:
Thankfully back home, I could count on the lifeguards not being stoned or talking to their friends or trying to hook up with someone.

This doesn't excuse the behavior here, but thinking our hormonal adolescent lifeguards back home are constantly vigilant over the course of an 8 hour shift while getting paid $9 an hour is a bit silly.


So often when you post stuff like this, SR, I'm reminded that we grew up in very different places.

Honestly, safety is a massive industry/culture in Canada.


True, and not saying it wasn't the case in your area, but I wonder if there are areas where it isn't quite so. I mean, Trailer Park Boys ain't real life, but there has to be a reason it caught on with Canadian (and American) audiences and I don't think it's because it is incredibly unrealistic. I'm pretty sure there's a crappy community pool or three in Canada where the low-paid life-guard is stoned and has zoned out.

That and Rob Ford.

I mean we have a safety industry and culture too in the States, but underneath it all are vast swaths of people who don't give a crap and often delight in recklessness.

I mean, seriously, given what we know about human nature, I think the claim that back home lifeguards, 19 year olds and likely stoned, are vigilant upholders of pool/beach safety and law and order is the far more unlikely claim. What, you think a bunch aren't stoned? Do lifeguards not smoke weed? You think they aren't staring at some chick's *beep*? You think at some point when dealing with 20 screaming kids day after day, they don't cruise and zone out at times?

Again, I think at indoor, deeper pools where at risk swimmers are, there's the vigilance we describe, but I'm pretty sure there's some pools out there where its the equivalent of a sheriff in a sleepy small town.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
atwood



Joined: 26 Dec 2009

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steelrails wrote:
atwood wrote:


Lifeguards are the lords of the pool and the beach; they're not backing down, no matter what kind of pool they're working at. They're not cowardly Koreans who are cowed by anyone older than them.


Do you seriously believe that?

That's why they get the hot chicks, bra.

Watch this and learn a little something: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oIZ45Coo9k
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Mr. BlackCat



Joined: 30 Nov 2005
Location: Insert witty remark HERE

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Typical thread here. Someone posts a relevant observation about their life in Korea, SR pipes in almost immediately with fantastical comparisons that have no basis in reality with the US in order to mask any sort of small criticism of anything Korean.

"I saw Korean lifeguards not paying attention at the pool today with my own two eyes."

"Well, right now every single lifeguard in the US is stoned and hitting on a girl and not even at their post. ANOTHER WIN FOR KOREA!"

Please SR, enlighten us. If a child dies at a pool in Korea, will you be the one to run down to the pool to explain to the parents that this one time a lifeguard in California got stoned and therefore the death of their child means nothing so shut up because you're making Korea look bad!

By the way, a lifeguard in North America being high on the job or not paying attention would be a pretty big scandal, especially when kids are involved. With twitter and whatnot, a sleeping lifeguard at a beach or pool would make it around the world before he woke up and got fired.

But anyway, I'm sure your grandparents invented lifeguarding and you spent your youth as a lifeguard instructor, or whatever, so you win again.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
3DR



Joined: 24 May 2009

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually thought that swimming was the one thing here that was totally over protective and swimmers are treated like babies.

We tried going to a pool, and they wanted us to wear life jackets in standing water.

And I've heard many complaints about the beach and them being overprotective so I just try to find a less crowded beach.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Mr. BlackCat



Joined: 30 Nov 2005
Location: Insert witty remark HERE

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have to agree, in my experience it's total overprotection. Then when you go off and find a random stream or river to jump in the locals come running telling you it's too dangerous (in knee deep water with almost no current). But then again, I've never been to a kiddie pool or been responsible for children around water.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
r2b2ct



Joined: 14 Jun 2013

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most Koreans can't swim at all from what I can tell. There's a little paranoia going on here about water.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Captain Corea



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 7:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steelrails wrote:
Captain Corea wrote:
Steelrails wrote:
Thankfully back home, I could count on the lifeguards not being stoned or talking to their friends or trying to hook up with someone.

This doesn't excuse the behavior here, but thinking our hormonal adolescent lifeguards back home are constantly vigilant over the course of an 8 hour shift while getting paid $9 an hour is a bit silly.


So often when you post stuff like this, SR, I'm reminded that we grew up in very different places.

Honestly, safety is a massive industry/culture in Canada.


True, and not saying it wasn't the case in your area, but I wonder if there are areas where it isn't quite so. I mean, Trailer Park Boys ain't real life, but there has to be a reason it caught on with Canadian (and American) audiences and I don't think it's because it is incredibly unrealistic. I'm pretty sure there's a crappy community pool or three in Canada where the low-paid life-guard is stoned and has zoned out.

That and Rob Ford.


I'm sorry, man. But these two examples show how little you know about Canada. To bring up a fictional/comedy tv show, and an asshat politician in a discussion about public pool safety, really makes me shake my head.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
atwood



Joined: 26 Dec 2009

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mr. BlackCat wrote:
I have to agree, in my experience it's total overprotection. Then when you go off and find a random stream or river to jump in the locals come running telling you it's too dangerous (in knee deep water with almost no current). But then again, I've never been to a kiddie pool or been responsible for children around water.

In Korea, it's very often all or nothing. (Too much or too little if you prefer.)

As another poster notes, many Koreans can't swim and have never overcome their fear of the water.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Steelrails



Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Location: Earth, Solar System

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 12:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

atwood wrote:
Steelrails wrote:
atwood wrote:


Lifeguards are the lords of the pool and the beach; they're not backing down, no matter what kind of pool they're working at. They're not cowardly Koreans who are cowed by anyone older than them.


Do you seriously believe that?

That's why they get the hot chicks, bra.

Watch this and learn a little something: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oIZ45Coo9k


Yes, because if there is one thing that describes cheesy 70s educational videos, its that they tell it EXACTLY the way it is.

Quote:
"I saw Korean lifeguards not paying attention at the pool today with my own two eyes."

"Well, right now every single lifeguard in the US is stoned and hitting on a girl and not even at their post. ANOTHER WIN FOR KOREA!"


You're missing the point, its that this isn't something unique to Korea that people might try to make it out to be. This is something that tends to happen with 19 year olds watching the kiddy pool the world over.

Quote:
By the way, a lifeguard in North America being high on the job or not paying attention would be a pretty big scandal, especially when kids are involved. With twitter and whatnot, a sleeping lifeguard at a beach or pool would make it around the world before he woke up and got fired.


Were any of your friends stoners back home? Did any become lifeguards?

Just because it would be a big scandal, doesn't mean it doesn't go on all the time. You think the guy out driving on the road and delivering your pizzas while driving through your suburban neighborhood where kids play isn't stoned? Or 90% of the staff at your restaurant that you worry about getting food-borne illness at isn't stoned?

Anyone who knows the scene back home knows that ALL KINDS of people get high, many at work.

And anyone who knows our lawsuit culture knows that parents freak out if you stare at their kids too long, freak out if you try to discipline them while taking them out to the pool, and that teens are openly disrespectful of authority, especially when its some 19 year old saying it.

Quote:
To bring up a fictional/comedy tv show


What everyone who has seen that show and appreciated it has said- "I know people like that". Every one of the characters, someone can point to an equivalent person in their life, to a degree. There has to be a reason in caught on- truth is at the heart of comedy. You think there aren't a bunch of people working low paying jobs, like lifeguarding, who smoke weed?

Now, I'm not saying I know Canada as well as you, but I do know stoners, and Canada has a fair share of stoners. I also know people who work low paying jobs, deal with parents and kids, and teenagers (having been one), put all those together, which makes up the typical lifeguard, and yeah- hitting on chicks, getting stoned as you sit there through the job, trying to keep order while not getting sued, and yes, making sure no one drops dead on your shift.

As for Rob Ford, if safety was indeed priority #1 in Canada, he wouldn't be pulling 30%.

Now I agree that in legitimate enterprises and government, safety is probably a huge priority and at the top of the chain, more so than Korea by far. But that doesn't mean that lurking underneath is a bunch of people who really don't give that much of a crap.

Anyways, people are free to try and convince themselves that the $9/hr. teenage lifeguard back home is 100% not under the influence of drugs and is maintaining constant vigilance, totally not oggling chicks or zoning out behind his sunglasses.

That requires as much mental disconnect as believing your local Korean bus driver has your safety as a top priority and is not hungover on soju.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jvalmer



Joined: 06 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 1:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

atwood wrote:
As another poster notes, many Koreans can't swim and have never overcome their fear of the water.

Where does this come from? Is it true? Are there stats to back this up? And who cares?

I can't swim, and a lot of my friends can't. Didn't realize it was such a big deal.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Captain Corea



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 1:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steelrails wrote:
Were any of your friends stoners back home? Did any become lifeguards?


yes.

no.


Steelrails wrote:


Quote:
To bring up a fictional/comedy tv show


What everyone who has seen that show and appreciated it has said- "I know people like that". Every one of the characters, someone can point to an equivalent person in their life, to a degree. There has to be a reason in caught on- truth is at the heart of comedy. You think there aren't a bunch of people working low paying jobs, like lifeguarding, who smoke weed?

Now, I'm not saying I know Canada as well as you, but I do know stoners, and Canada has a fair share of stoners. I also know people who work low paying jobs, deal with parents and kids, and teenagers (having been one), put all those together, which makes up the typical lifeguard, and yeah- hitting on chicks, getting stoned as you sit there through the job, trying to keep order while not getting sued, and yes, making sure no one drops dead on your shift.

As for Rob Ford, if safety was indeed priority #1 in Canada, he wouldn't be pulling 30%.

Now I agree that in legitimate enterprises and government, safety is probably a huge priority and at the top of the chain, more so than Korea by far. But that doesn't mean that lurking underneath is a bunch of people who really don't give that much of a crap.

Anyways, people are free to try and convince themselves that the $9/hr. teenage lifeguard back home is 100% not under the influence of drugs and is maintaining constant vigilance, totally not oggling chicks or zoning out behind his sunglasses.

That requires as much mental disconnect as believing your local Korean bus driver has your safety as a top priority and is not hungover on soju.


It never ceases to amaze me when you talk about stuff you obviously know so little about. Just because you equate tv with real life, does not make it so.

No doubt you watch tv shows and see ppl you know in them. Me, I watch tv shows and laugh at the absurdity of them - the extreme nature of the characters.

Simple question for ya, SR - how many times have you been in a Canadian swimming pool?

If none, please STFU about them.

Stick with what you know.



jvalmer wrote:
atwood wrote:
As another poster notes, many Koreans can't swim and have never overcome their fear of the water.

Where does this come from? Is it true? Are there stats to back this up? And who cares?

I can't swim, and a lot of my friends can't. Didn't realize it was such a big deal.


Do you feel that's common in Canada? Because honestly, I don't know of a friend back home that can't swim (to some degree).

I have no links to back it up, but I too am amazed at how many Koreans that say they can't swim.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cabeza



Joined: 29 Sep 2012

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 1:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jvalmer wrote:
atwood wrote:
As another poster notes, many Koreans can't swim and have never overcome their fear of the water.

Where does this come from? Is it true? Are there stats to back this up? And who cares?

I can't swim, and a lot of my friends can't. Didn't realize it was such a big deal.


Growing up where I did swimming lessons were compulsory from about 5 years old on, but many parents taught their kids to swim before that. It was just part of growing up. Learn to walk, learn to swim, learn to ride a two wheeler.

The first time I actually thought about it was I worked with a lot of different nationalities in Italy and some people couldn't swim. I was shocked. Now, not so much.

Nothing wrong with it. Not a big deal. Just surprising.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jvalmer



Joined: 06 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 1:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Captain Corea wrote:
Do you feel that's common in Canada? Because honestly, I don't know of a friend back home that can't swim (to some degree).

I have no links to back it up, but I too am amazed at how many Koreans that say they can't swim.

Remember Canada is a massive country. Just because someone calls their electric bill a 'hydro' bill, doesn't mean the whole country does.

I guess growing up in Alberta maybe a factor. I'd say it's 50/50 among my friends who can/can't swim. Alberta is landlocked, and is pretty much dry as a bone, and if you get caught in a river, most likely the currents would pull even an Olympic gold medalist under to their death.

Also, my family took maybe a grand total of like 3 vacations when I was growing up. So very little opportunity to actually see a body of water larger than my bathtub.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Captain Corea



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 1:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jvalmer wrote:
Captain Corea wrote:
Do you feel that's common in Canada? Because honestly, I don't know of a friend back home that can't swim (to some degree).

I have no links to back it up, but I too am amazed at how many Koreans that say they can't swim.

Remember Canada is a massive country. Just because someone calls their electric bill a 'hydro' bill, doesn't mean the whole country does.

I guess growing up in Alberta maybe a factor. I'd say it's 50/50 among my friends who can/can't swim. Alberta is landlocked, and is pretty much dry as a bone, and if you get caught in a river, most likely the currents would pull even an Olympic gold medalist under to their death.

Also, my family took maybe a grand total of like 3 vacations when I was growing up. So very little opportunity to actually see a body of water larger than my bathtub.


That could be it. I grew up in Alberta too, but learned to swim right away. Every community had a pool, and every summer I'd vacation in the Okanagan.

Maybe it's a big city thing? Calgary has no shortage of swimming pools - even in the poor areas. lol
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jvalmer



Joined: 06 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 1:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It might be a cultural/language thing too. Unless they are potentially Olympic class swimmers, they won't admit knowing how to swim.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> General Discussion Forum All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Page 2 of 5

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2013 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International