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"1 in 6 dies early from fine dust"?!?!
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Joe Boxer



Joined: 25 Dec 2007
Location: Bundang, South Korea

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 9:18 pm    Post subject: "1 in 6 dies early from fine dust"?!?! Reply with quote

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20150420001188

Is this something we should all be worried about??
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Underwaterbob



Joined: 08 Jan 2005
Location: In Cognito

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One in six is huge. I don't know how much I trust an article this vague though:

Quote:
About 15,000 adults aged 30 or older in Seoul City and Gyeonggi Province die earlier than they otherwise would each year because of air pollution, especially fine dust, the report said. This accounts for about 16 percent of the yearly death toll of those aged over 30 in the two regions.


What is "earlier than they otherwise would"? Are we talking otherwise healthy 35 year-olds dropping in the streets, or 60 year-old, lifetime smokers whose respiratory systems were already in shambles?
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nicwr2002



Joined: 17 Aug 2011

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 11:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Underwaterbob wrote:
One in six is huge. I don't know how much I trust an article this vague though:

Quote:
About 15,000 adults aged 30 or older in Seoul City and Gyeonggi Province die earlier than they otherwise would each year because of air pollution, especially fine dust, the report said. This accounts for about 16 percent of the yearly death toll of those aged over 30 in the two regions.


What is "earlier than they otherwise would"? Are we talking otherwise healthy 35 year-olds dropping in the streets, or 60 year-old, lifetime smokers whose respiratory systems were already in shambles?


They are probably referring to the average life expectancy in Korea. I read another article that people in China lose about 10 years of their life living in those polluted conditions.
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World Traveler



Joined: 29 May 2009

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pollution weakens one's immune system (which is definitely not good) and also causes lung cancer.

When not killing people, it can reduce their quality of life through increased incidence of illness.
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Adventurer



Joined: 28 Jan 2006

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nicwr2002 wrote:
Underwaterbob wrote:
One in six is huge. I don't know how much I trust an article this vague though:

Quote:
About 15,000 adults aged 30 or older in Seoul City and Gyeonggi Province die earlier than they otherwise would each year because of air pollution, especially fine dust, the report said. This accounts for about 16 percent of the yearly death toll of those aged over 30 in the two regions.


What is "earlier than they otherwise would"? Are we talking otherwise healthy 35 year-olds dropping in the streets, or 60 year-old, lifetime smokers whose respiratory systems were already in shambles?


They are probably referring to the average life expectancy in Korea. I read another article that people in China lose about 10 years of their life living in those polluted conditions.


A few days ago, a Korean student tried to claim that Koreans are not really affected, but foreigners are. Other Koreans thought he was being ridiculous when I mentioned what he said. And one girl I know mentioned that many Koreans die earlier than expected due to the pollution i.e. it cuts down on the life expectancy. I wasn't thinking much about the pollution, but when I tried to figure out why I was having many sinus infections, feeling like I had no energy, it just dawned on me that the pollution in 2015 is a lot worse than when I first lived here from 2006-2009. I was feeling in 2011, when I came back, and I think it has been getting worse, progressively, the way my body's been reacting.

I have been drinking a lot of green tea lately, because I know it helps smokers. It sometimes feels like I'm smoking a pack of cigarettes when I step outside some days. Today, the air felt relative clean, and the sun was shining.
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nicwr2002



Joined: 17 Aug 2011

PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2015 3:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adventurer wrote:
nicwr2002 wrote:
Underwaterbob wrote:
One in six is huge. I don't know how much I trust an article this vague though:

Quote:
About 15,000 adults aged 30 or older in Seoul City and Gyeonggi Province die earlier than they otherwise would each year because of air pollution, especially fine dust, the report said. This accounts for about 16 percent of the yearly death toll of those aged over 30 in the two regions.


What is "earlier than they otherwise would"? Are we talking otherwise healthy 35 year-olds dropping in the streets, or 60 year-old, lifetime smokers whose respiratory systems were already in shambles?


They are probably referring to the average life expectancy in Korea. I read another article that people in China lose about 10 years of their life living in those polluted conditions.


A few days ago, a Korean student tried to claim that Koreans are not really affected, but foreigners are. Other Koreans thought he was being ridiculous when I mentioned what he said. And one girl I know mentioned that many Koreans die earlier than expected due to the pollution i.e. it cuts down on the life expectancy. I wasn't thinking much about the pollution, but when I tried to figure out why I was having many sinus infections, feeling like I had no energy, it just dawned on me that the pollution in 2015 is a lot worse than when I first lived here from 2006-2009. I was feeling in 2011, when I came back, and I think it has been getting worse, progressively, the way my body's been reacting.

I have been drinking a lot of green tea lately, because I know it helps smokers. It sometimes feels like I'm smoking a pack of cigarettes when I step outside some days. Today, the air felt relative clean, and the sun was shining.


Your student could be correct actually. As babies growing up in these conditions, their body may have grow accustomed to the pollution in a way where it doesn't bother them in an allergy sense. It doesn't mean that the fine dust won't still cut their life expectancy short though. Their bodies just may not give them allergic reactions.
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Weigookin74



Joined: 26 Oct 2009

PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2015 4:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is this mostly around Seoul area? I'm guessing localized pollution combined with dust and faint Chinese pollution is a worse mix than other places in Korea.
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Adventurer



Joined: 28 Jan 2006

PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2015 4:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Weigookin74 wrote:
Is this mostly around Seoul area? I'm guessing localized pollution combined with dust and faint Chinese pollution is a worse mix than other places in Korea.


Actually, I hate to say it, but expats in the Gwangju area, which is in Jeolla-namdo have also been feeling it noticeably. I don't know why. I would have thought it would have much more in the Seoul area. I'm actually reacting worse in 2015 in Gwangju then I did in the Ilsan area from 2007-2009. That tells me that the pollution in 2015 is a lot worse in much of Korea except for maybe Busan and some areas near the sea.

I just checked the pollution and my area was at 123 (I'm in Gwangju), and parts of Seoul are around 80. It makes no sense. Why would parts of Gwangju be worse?
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creeper1



Joined: 30 Jan 2007

PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2015 2:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Korea has a slight problem with sand being blown from the Gobi desert in spring time. This kind of pollution is called PM 10. These consist of big particles. PM 10, although undesirable are dealt with by the hairs in the lungs. They can be coughed out and don't cause much damage.

http://www.airinfonow.org/html/ed_particulate.html

Also a mask can save you from these particles.

Much more dangerous and scary is the smaller PM 2.5 particles. These are very hazardous to human health and NOT blocked by the hairs in the lungs or masks. They penetrate deep into the lungs. They are much harder for us to deal with and cause multiple health effects.

When looking at AQI pay attention to PM 2.5.

Korea, being a developed country, usually has a low PM 2.5 level.
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World Traveler



Joined: 29 May 2009

PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2015 4:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Along with yellow dust from China in spring, ultrafine dust or particulate matter 2.5 ― particles 2.5 micrometers or less in diameter ― have become a major threat to public health.

Last year, the Seoul Metropolitan Government issued ultrafine alerts 11 times, triple the number from the year before, city officials said.

The capital also saw an average ultrafine dust concentration of 25.2 micrograms per cubic meter in 2012, which is more than double the safe level advised by the World Health Organization, according to the Environment Ministry.

In the same year, other major metropolitan cities such as New York, London and Paris reached only around 15 micrograms per cubic meter.

Health concerns are escalating as PM-2.5 can lead to much more serious health problems than other larger particles.

“Ultrafine dust is so small that it not only causes respiratory problems but also enters the circulatory system unlike other types of dust,” said Kim Woon-soo, a senior research fellow at the Seoul Institute.

While China has generally been blamed for the murky air in the case of yellow dust, the significantly lesser-known cause of the ultrafine dust comes from home, experts say.

Recent studies have found that the majority of PM 2.5 here originates from within the peninsula.

In 2013, ultrafine dust from China only accounted for 30 to 50 percent of the total, the government’s data showed. The rest was triggered by local coal-fired power plants and diesel cars.


http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20150323000889
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atwood



Joined: 26 Dec 2009

PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2015 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

World Traveler wrote:
Along with yellow dust from China in spring, ultrafine dust or particulate matter 2.5 ― particles 2.5 micrometers or less in diameter ― have become a major threat to public health.

Last year, the Seoul Metropolitan Government issued ultrafine alerts 11 times, triple the number from the year before, city officials said.

The capital also saw an average ultrafine dust concentration of 25.2 micrograms per cubic meter in 2012, which is more than double the safe level advised by the World Health Organization, according to the Environment Ministry.

In the same year, other major metropolitan cities such as New York, London and Paris reached only around 15 micrograms per cubic meter.

Health concerns are escalating as PM-2.5 can lead to much more serious health problems than other larger particles.

“Ultrafine dust is so small that it not only causes respiratory problems but also enters the circulatory system unlike other types of dust,” said Kim Woon-soo, a senior research fellow at the Seoul Institute.

While China has generally been blamed for the murky air in the case of yellow dust, the significantly lesser-known cause of the ultrafine dust comes from home, experts say.

Recent studies have found that the majority of PM 2.5 here originates from within the peninsula.

In 2013, ultrafine dust from China only accounted for 30 to 50 percent of the total, the government’s data showed. The rest was triggered by local coal-fired power plants and diesel cars.


http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20150323000889

And with nuclear power currently problematic, Korea is looking at using more coal.
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World Traveler



Joined: 29 May 2009

PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2016 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2016/04/116_174608.html

Greenpeace said that among all sources of air pollution, the nation's 53 coal power plants should be identified for action

"But the government plans to build 13 more coal plants by 2021, while 11 are under construction," Greenpeace said. "We wonder why the government remains passive in developing renewable energy sources."

Greenpeace states that Korea relies on coal plants for 39 percent of its energy production and is the fourth biggest coal importer in the world.
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TheMeerkatLover



Joined: 26 Mar 2009

PostPosted: Tue Apr 12, 2016 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would suggest there are numerous factors in play:

High consumption of alcohol
Little to no exercise
Low quality diet
Sedentary lifestyle
Highly stressful home/work/living environment
low-mod level of medical care
few chances for improvement of circumstances
toxic air

I'm sure the toxic air is more the straw then the main culprit, but most people here who are 40 look OLD compared to back home. It's really sad.
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Weigookin74



Joined: 26 Oct 2009

PostPosted: Wed Apr 13, 2016 4:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adventurer wrote:
nicwr2002 wrote:
Underwaterbob wrote:
One in six is huge. I don't know how much I trust an article this vague though:

Quote:
About 15,000 adults aged 30 or older in Seoul City and Gyeonggi Province die earlier than they otherwise would each year because of air pollution, especially fine dust, the report said. This accounts for about 16 percent of the yearly death toll of those aged over 30 in the two regions.


What is "earlier than they otherwise would"? Are we talking otherwise healthy 35 year-olds dropping in the streets, or 60 year-old, lifetime smokers whose respiratory systems were already in shambles?


They are probably referring to the average life expectancy in Korea. I read another article that people in China lose about 10 years of their life living in those polluted conditions.


A few days ago, a Korean student tried to claim that Koreans are not really affected, but foreigners are. Other Koreans thought he was being ridiculous when I mentioned what he said. And one girl I know mentioned that many Koreans die earlier than expected due to the pollution i.e. it cuts down on the life expectancy. I wasn't thinking much about the pollution, but when I tried to figure out why I was having many sinus infections, feeling like I had no energy, it just dawned on me that the pollution in 2015 is a lot worse than when I first lived here from 2006-2009. I was feeling in 2011, when I came back, and I think it has been getting worse, progressively, the way my body's been reacting.

I have been drinking a lot of green tea lately, because I know it helps smokers. It sometimes feels like I'm smoking a pack of cigarettes when I step outside some days. Today, the air felt relative clean, and the sun was shining.


Koreans probably develop a tolerance to it growing up here. It still affects them long term however. But, the more immediate effects their body handles. If I bike up a mountain on a humid day here in which the pollution gets trapped in it and I breath deeply into my lungs, I get a bad coughing and semi feverish reaction to it afterwards. Koreans on the other hand do the same thing (decked out in their spandex bike gear) and seem to have no effect to the humid mixed pollution nor feel the humidity.
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Weigookin74



Joined: 26 Oct 2009

PostPosted: Wed Apr 13, 2016 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

World Traveler wrote:
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2016/04/116_174608.html

Greenpeace said that among all sources of air pollution, the nation's 53 coal power plants should be identified for action

"But the government plans to build 13 more coal plants by 2021, while 11 are under construction," Greenpeace said. "We wonder why the government remains passive in developing renewable energy sources."

Greenpeace states that Korea relies on coal plants for 39 percent of its energy production and is the fourth biggest coal importer in the world.


Why are they not building more nuclear plants? Even with Fukushima, it did survive the earthquake. Their only mistake was not building a seawall hgih enough to keep out the flood. Otherwise it would have perfectly safe. As for Chernoble, the Soviet Union was corrupt and safety procedures were ignored. Modern building standards, safety standards followed make it much safer and much less polluting than other forms of energy. (I do believe many environmentalists have come around on the question of nuclear energy.)
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