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Has anyone seen the following cereals
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greyhound



Joined: 10 Jun 2016

PostPosted: Sat Jul 23, 2016 3:54 pm    Post subject: Has anyone seen the following cereals Reply with quote

Weetabix, Rice Krispies, Coco Pops, Honey Nut Loops.
I've just bought a Korean cereal which is a bit like cornflakes, is almond flavour and branded by Kelloggs. I haven't seen any of the others.
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CentralCali



Joined: 17 May 2007

PostPosted: Sat Jul 23, 2016 4:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If it's Kelloggs, it's not Korean; it's American. All that Korean writing is on the box so Koreans can read it. All of the products you mention can be purchased at Home Plus (that's an outfit that used to be owned by Tesco in partnership with Samsung in Korea) and E-mart. Of course they're all more expensive than you're probably used to paying since cereal isn't really a Korean thing for breakfast.
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greyhound



Joined: 10 Jun 2016

PostPosted: Sat Jul 23, 2016 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

F==k me!!!!!!!!!!!! I just went to another corner shop and found some cocopops. I also bought some milk. You know how much it cost me? 9100 fkin won!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I thought you all said 400,000 won would be enough for the month to bring. It's only going to last 2 weeks.
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greyhound



Joined: 10 Jun 2016

PostPosted: Sat Jul 23, 2016 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think next week I'm going to just east SPAM and rice. Spam's about 3000 a tin. Monty Python's Flying Circus here we come Laughing
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CentralCali



Joined: 17 May 2007

PostPosted: Sat Jul 23, 2016 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Didn't someone mention in another thread not to buy stuff at convenience stores? Write a shopping list, take it to the store, and buy local stuff. Stick to the list. You might even want to run the list through a translator site. Don't eat at restaurants, stay away from booze and tobacco for the month (forever, if you're smart), develop a taste for tofu, eggs, and oats. Rice is prevalent, of course, but it's not exactly cheap. Also develop a taste for in season vegetables and fruits. Imports will cost you. Oh, and stay out of bars. If you're really hankering for a beer, go to a large supermarket (Home Plus, E-mart) and buy the cheap (aka local) stuff there. Basically, eat local products at home. Once you get your passport back from Immigration, sign up for a loyalty card at the big supermarkets so you get both the member price and points towards free stuff.

BTW, don't buy Spam; get the local stuff. Or you could do like I do: be vegetarian.
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PRagic



Joined: 24 Feb 2006

PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2016 12:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also, look for the local outdoor market. Ask at your hagwon and they should be able to point you right to one.

That'll be the place to get veggies, meats, chicken, eggs, fish, etc, and they usually have a discount mart in there where you can pick up milk, booze, or whatever else you're in the mood for. Most markets also usually have a local bakery or two. Pick up a loaf of wheat or white and maybe some breakfast breads to boot.

STAY AWAY from the mini-marts.

Cereal is not the way to go here. Way expensive both in terms of the cereal itself and the cost of the milk. Got a toaster or a toaster oven? A pot and a frying pan? Rice cooker? Do up some eggs with toast, French toast, hard boiled eggs, etc. Get some tuna and mayo and make some sandwiches. Spam is nuclear.

Local pork (Samgyupsal or Moksal) is pretty good and economical, too, by the way, and easy to do at home. Bacon is expensive.

You can also get some of the soft tofu at a grocery store or at the market, and they usually sell packets to make the stew (Sundubuchigyae). Crack an egg in there when it's boiling and it's all good. Three servings at least for a few quid.

Dwaenjangchigyae, made with the brown paste, is also awesome with a potato (regular or sweet) and onion, plus some hard tofu chucked in there. You can buy the brown paste by the jar at any market along with the tofu. Boil some water up, chuck in your veggies, and then dilute a couple of spoons of the paste in there. You're set for a couple of meals at least, maybe more depending on the size of your pot. Again, a few quid for a pot of wholesome goodness. Spice it up with a few hot green peppers.

In both cases, try the dishes at a restaurant to get an idea of how they should taste first. Just a suggestion.

A low budget option is ramen noodes. You can get the spicy variety or the non spicy variety (e.g. komtang). Again, don't buy at the mini-mart, and get the packs that you have to make, not the instant variety in prepacked bowls. Add an egg, and even some spam if you must, and it'll get you full.

Mandoo ('potstickers') are also pretty cheap by the (frozen) bag and easy to do up at home, either in the fry pan or steamed.

On the street, you'll see places selling 'dokbokee', a bunch of soft rice cakes in a hot red sauce. Cheap, and it'll fill you up. Add a couple of breaded fried sweet potato (or squid or stuffed pepper), sold along side as a staple, and you're in business. Ramen, mandoo, and dokbokee aren't the healthiest of options, but they'll get you full in a pinch on the cheap.

So many food possibilities. Start stretching that food dime and welcome to the culinary experience that is Korea.
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greyhound



Joined: 10 Jun 2016

PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2016 12:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

can you get chicken breasts? I saw whole chickens for sale at the market for 7000 but I'd already bought this minced beef and steak by then so I didn't buy one. Their chickens don't look like an English chicken. They're all white and still have the head on it. If I can get chicken breasts then I can make a stir fry or Chinese curry. I seen the curry powder sauce in the convenience store. I don't know how to make stews. WHat do you have to do? Get a load of boiling water and throw in a bunch of tofu and stuff then? There's 10 days to go before payday where I should get 2 weeks pay so around 1m won.
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PRagic



Joined: 24 Feb 2006

PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2016 1:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can get chichen breasts, whole chickens (no head on em), or chicken parts. Depends on where you shop. Korean chickens are small; they resemble more of game hen. If you want jumbo chickens, go to COSTCO.

You can get curry powder in virtually ANY Korean store. It's a yellow curry. Costco sells the brown Japanse curry paste in multi-box packs. Very good.

Just a regular pot will do for stews. Sure you can find a Youtube video on how to make Korean stews. Knock yourself out.
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greyhound



Joined: 10 Jun 2016

PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2016 1:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PRagic wrote:
Knock yourself out.
You make me laff. Laughing Laughing Laughing
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greyhound



Joined: 10 Jun 2016

PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2016 1:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't see Costco in Ulsan. I can just find the general Costco website. WHat's the address od Costco in Ulsan then?
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frankhenry



Joined: 13 Mar 2007

PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2016 1:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

greyhound wrote:
F==k me!!!!!!!!!!!! I just went to another corner shop and found some cocopops. I also bought some milk. You know how much it cost me? 9100 fkin won!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I thought you all said 400,000 won would be enough for the month to bring. It's only going to last 2 weeks.


I suggested 700,000 won.
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PRagic



Joined: 24 Feb 2006

PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2016 2:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Think another poster already mentioned that there isn't one in Ulsan. You'll have to make a trip to your nearest location. Ask at your school where that is. Someone will know.

Don't forget that you're going to have to fork out for your membership first, so budget that in. Plus round trip transportation. Might end up running you 60-80,000 won just getting there and back and getting your card.

And most guys I know can drop 200K in Costco in no time flat. If you're REALLY going to stock up, figure at least 200-300,000 won, more if you want better cuts of beef, cheeses, cereals and booze. So if nothing else, your head teacher job will help to offset your Costco runs. Won't cover them, but it'll help.

For the time being at least, the local outdoor market is your friend.
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denverdeath



Joined: 21 May 2005
Location: Boo-sahn

PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2016 4:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PRagic wrote:
Think another poster already mentioned that there isn't one in Ulsan. You'll have to make a trip to your nearest location. Ask at your school where that is. Someone will know.

Don't forget that you're going to have to fork out for your membership first, so budget that in. Plus round trip transportation. Might end up running you 60-80,000 won just getting there and back and getting your card.

And most guys I know can drop 200K in Costco in no time flat. If you're REALLY going to stock up, figure at least 200-300,000 won, more if you want better cuts of beef, cheeses, cereals and booze. So if nothing else, your head teacher job will help to offset your Costco runs. Won't cover them, but it'll help.

For the time being at least, the local outdoor market is your friend.


Yeah, if you're already down a hundred, let costco wait for a month or two. As I said, busan or daegu are your closest options...not one in ulsan.

Gmarket.co.kr can also be great for cereals, but cart b4 the horse, remember? Also know that alot of the korean "cereals" whether they're american brands or not, will often be sweeter than the ones you find at home. Cereal is more like a snack here, not really breakfast, as CentralCali has said. Iherb.com is also great for proper oatmeal and muesli and/or granola for breakfast. Again though, get settled first.
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Fallacy



Joined: 29 Jun 2015
Location: ex-ROK

PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2016 5:52 am    Post subject: RE: The Newborn Entertainment Reply with quote

greyhound wrote:
I think next week I'm going to just eat SPAM and rice. Spam's about 3000 a tin.
This. Go native, and everything will work out fine.
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Harpeau



Joined: 01 Feb 2003
Location: In Hannam-dong, Seoul.

PostPosted: Mon Jul 25, 2016 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PRagic wrote:
Local pork (Samgyupsal or Moksal) is pretty good and economical, too, by the way, and easy to do at home. Bacon is expensive.


Our local butcher shop in Hannam dong has German Samgyupsal for sale at about 1/2 the price of the Korean version. Ask your butcher.
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