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What is a ricecake?
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billybrobby



Joined: 09 Dec 2004

PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 8:36 pm    Post subject: What is a ricecake? Reply with quote

I thought I knew, but now I'm confused. Do you know Ddokbokki ()? That weird rice-based food that's slathered in red sauce and sold in street stalls practically everywhere? Well, Koreans always translate it as 'ricecake.' But I always thought a ricecake was a bunch of dried, puffed-up rice pushed together to form something not unlike a beer coaster. Am I wrong?
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tzechuk



Joined: 20 Dec 2004

PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are wrong. Rice cake is the stuff in ddeokbbokgi. That's one variation of it... there are others which taste sweet too.
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Swiss James



Joined: 26 Nov 2003
Location: Shanghai

PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the ddeok bit means rice cake, I guess bokki is the name of the sauce or some 'ting.

This is ddeok too,


mmmm, looks nice. Mmmmm tastes of nothing.
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OiGirl



Joined: 23 Jan 2003
Location: Hoke-y-gun

PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In Korea, rice cakes are as described and pictured.
There is a food which we call rice cakes in the US, very popular as a diet food in the 1980s. It is as the OP described, puffed rice stuck together, completely tasteless. Actually, that's available in Korea, too, from places like the guy on the sidewalk with his rice-puffing machine which always scares me to death!
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billybrobby



Joined: 09 Dec 2004

PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

man...so weird...am i wrong? I know what koreans mean by 'ricecake' but i just thought that word belonged to another food. before you came to korea, if somebody said 'ricecake' what did you think?
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Norm



Joined: 15 Jun 2004
Location: Life. Be in it.

PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 10:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Swiss James wrote:
the ddeok bit means rice cake, I guess bokki is the name of the sauce or some 'ting.

This is ddeok too,


Whaaaat? That's just a stack of glazed roof tiles.
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denverdeath



Joined: 21 May 2005
Location: Boo-sahn

PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 4:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

rice cake

It is a piece of cake.
Ա.

greeting fee , I think "bribe money" or "torture food" might be a better translation.

Can't find a translation for :

Next we met some of his friends and we had ddeokbokgi and hot dogs.
츮 ģ ̿ ֵ׸ Ծ.

My favorite food was ddeokbokgi." ̿."

I think I've seen it also translated as "gelatinous rice cake". This one makes more sense to me because of the gooey, greasy feel of it. I'm with James on the "flavourless" evaluation; however, a lot of Koreans love the stuff. The Japanese have some version similar to the one we're used to back home, but they usually coat it with fish/seaweed powder. I'm not sure whether it's worse or really worse. The Koreans like that, too.
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joe_doufu



Joined: 09 May 2005
Location: Elsewhere

PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 5:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I guess "ricecake" in Korea is something like "dumpling" in China.
I calculated that about 37.6% of Chinese menu items are called "dumplings" when translated into English.
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keithinkorea



Joined: 17 Mar 2004

PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 6:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A cake made of rice, in answer to your question.

They taste of nothing! Koreans don't often seem to have a very developed sense of taste. When I ask a student what they think is a delicious drink they often say 'water'!, Kimchi often is just rotten cabbage, since when has cabbage been an interesting vegetable? I quite like rice but it hardly has any real flavour, healthy though and there is nothing wrong with that.

Korean adults favourite drink is often soju and that just tastes like very bad vodka. The main reasons I cook at home so much is that so much Korean food leaves me completely uninspired and I'm happy to say I'm quite good in the kitchen.
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white_shadow



Joined: 28 Mar 2005

PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 7:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

keithinkorea wrote:

The main reasons I cook at home so much is that so much Korean food leaves me completely uninspired and I'm happy to say I'm quite good in the kitchen.


I don't think Korean food is uninspiring, I think it's more of a lack of your creativity and willingless. For example thouk, most of the time you see it with fish cake drowning in kojujang. But it has so much potential. I like to serve it with chanterelles, sorel and parsnips in a light broth. Mise en place consists of thouk ovalets, thinly sliced snips and shrooms, and some sorel. All you have to do is pour hot broth over them and its ready.

You could also make an entree or first course salad consisting of hearty greens and root vegetables. The markets around here sell excellent sesame oil. Its not bitter and overpowering like americanized brands. These work well for salad dressing. They sell two types, the red cap is the regular and the yellow cap is the type that is grown for their leaves.

Think of some of the panchan's (kimchee) out there. Acorn gelly, bean sprouts, cuttlefish, vegetables... I want to come up with some western style kimchee when I get home.
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keithinkorea



Joined: 17 Mar 2004

PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

white_shadow wrote:
keithinkorea wrote:

The main reasons I cook at home so much is that so much Korean food leaves me completely uninspired and I'm happy to say I'm quite good in the kitchen.


I don't think Korean food is uninspiring, I think it's more of a lack of your creativity and willingless. For example thouk, most of the time you see it with fish cake drowning in kojujang. But it has so much potential. I like to serve it with chanterelles, sorel and parsnips in a light broth. Mise en place consists of thouk ovalets, thinly sliced snips and shrooms, and some sorel. All you have to do is pour hot broth over them and its ready.

You could also make an entree or first course salad consisting of hearty greens and root vegetables. The markets around here sell excellent sesame oil. Its not bitter and overpowering like americanized brands. These work well for salad dressing. They sell two types, the red cap is the regular and the yellow cap is the type that is grown for their leaves.

Think of some of the panchan's (kimchee) out there. Acorn gelly, bean sprouts, cuttlefish, vegetables... I want to come up with some western style kimchee when I get home.


What is this 'thouk' stuff that you speak of?

I cook at home because I'm a much better cook than 99.9% of Koreans who work in restaurants! I like the availability of good ingredients here, it is a challenge as Korea has such restrictions on imports so it is very seasonal. I'm from the UK so I can cook or make anything at anytime of the year and whilst there is a bit of a seasonal thing going on in the UK it is nothing compared to here.

Where I used to live come aspharagus season it is heaven! Aspharagus is the king of vegetables. In Korea it is pretty annoying-challenging and wallet wrenching to just cook what you want and eat as you want.

Korea needs to open its markets to imports from countries that produce better food than the Korean climate allows. A fresh asparagus kimchi thing would be pretty tasty I imagine.
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Tiberious aka Sparkles



Joined: 23 Jan 2003
Location: I'm one cool cat!

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2005 1:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

keithinkorea wrote:
I'm happy to say I'm quite good in the kitchen.


Me too.

Wait, I thought you wrote 'bedroom.'

Sparkles*_*
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Swiss James



Joined: 26 Nov 2003
Location: Shanghai

PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2005 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

keithinkorea wrote:

I cook at home because I'm a much better cook than 99.9% of Koreans who work in restaurants! I like the availability of good ingredients here, it is a challenge as Korea has such restrictions on imports so it is very seasonal. I'm from the UK so I can cook or make anything at anytime of the year and whilst there is a bit of a seasonal thing going on in the UK it is nothing compared to here.

Where I used to live come aspharagus season it is heaven! Aspharagus is the king of vegetables. In Korea it is pretty annoying-challenging and wallet wrenching to just cook what you want and eat as you want.

Korea needs to open its markets to imports from countries that produce better food than the Korean climate allows. A fresh asparagus kimchi thing would be pretty tasty I imagine.


wow- now there's a guy who really thinks his ddong doesn't stink
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sparkx



Joined: 16 Jan 2003
Location: thekimchipot.com

PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2005 4:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

keithinkorea wrote:
Aspharagus is the king of vegetables


And here I thought Terri Schiavo was the king of vegetables.
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Harin



Joined: 03 May 2004
Location: Garden of Eden

PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2005 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sparkx wrote:
keithinkorea wrote:
Aspharagus is the king of vegetables


And here I thought Terri Schiavo was the king of vegetables.


didn't think she had a *beep*.
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