Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Korean Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

What would it take for you to learn a constructed language?
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Off-Topic Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  

What would it take for you to learn one?
Nothing. I like learning things like that just for fun.
25%
 25%  [ 4 ]
At least a hundred people, otherwise I'd feel lonely.
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
At least a few thousand.
6%
 6%  [ 1 ]
At least a hundred thousand.
6%
 6%  [ 1 ]
At least a million (population of Estonia).
6%
 6%  [ 1 ]
At least ten million (population of Hungary).
6%
 6%  [ 1 ]
At least a hundred million (population of Japan).
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Half a billion.
25%
 25%  [ 4 ]
I hate learning languages.
25%
 25%  [ 4 ]
Total Votes : 16

Author Message
little mixed girl



Joined: 11 Jun 2003
Location: shin hyesung's bed~

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i don't see "constructed friends" as a choice Sad
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pollyplummer



Joined: 07 Mar 2005
Location: McMinnvillve, Oregon

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 4:30 pm    Post subject: auxlangs Reply with quote

The environment of today may be much more conducive to the use of an auxlang, but, as the author most bitterly laments, the creators of these languages cannot seem to agree on much of anything and usually assume that everyone else is wrong. While the professed purpose of these languages is greater unity and ease in communication, there seems to be too much pride in the background of their creation. How then could a contructed language ever gain much popularity if every attempt for unified support crumbles in the face of pride and disagreement? Also, he says that there are thousands of options to choose from should the world decide it needs an auxlang. Are they quality options? I have no idea, since I've never studied one. Just how useful and comprehensive are they? Are there actual linguistic experts paid to create these things or are they someone's hobby? hehhehe... listen to me! Maybe 20 years from now these kinds of concerns will sound like someone a couple centuries ago saying, "But how could this idea of a telephone possibly be useful to anyone?!" Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
mithridates



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Location: President's office, Korean Space Agency

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2005 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

d503, how many people know your friend's language? Are there enough to start a Wikipedia? I've written a few hundred articles for our wikipedia this month and we've gone from 47th to 41st place. Going around translating articles from one Wikipedia into another is not only a good way to practice, but also to increase the chances of the language being noticed. It's also where you have to really decide on how you're going to go about transcribing foreign names and countries. Each language needs a system of its own for that, or it's screwed every time a place name comes up.
Antonius Blero - Latin for Tony Blair.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
guangho



Joined: 19 Jan 2005
Location: a spot full of deception, stupidity, and public micturation and thus unfit for longterm residency

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2005 1:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm always going on about how you can only truly learn a language through immersion but here I am nearly 6 months in and my Korean is still nonexistent. Sad
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
mithridates



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Location: President's office, Korean Space Agency

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2005 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you have a hanja dictionary ()? If you're stuck at the basic level but are still good linguistically (weren't you in French immersion?) you might want to pick one up and just browse through it for a while to get a good idea of how the vocab is made up. Kind of like a dictionary of Greek and Latin roots. s can be bought just about anywhere for only 5000 won or so, and you don't need to know how to write the hanja either (but you do have to learn how to look them up).
Just a thought.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
stumptown



Joined: 11 Apr 2005
Location: Paju: Wife beating capital of Korea

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2005 11:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a good idea mith. During my Korean class on the weekends when the new vocabulary is being introduced, I make it a habit of asking if the words are pure Korean or Chinese. My dictionary also has the hanja characters for many of the words. If you know what the root words are, it will help you piece together compound nouns. I'm going to pick up one of the hangeul/hanja dictionaries when I go to Seoul.
Anyway, mith I pm'ed you about learning Korean. Have you seen a linguistic textbook on Korea that is published by Cambridge press. It has a great deconstruction of Korean on all linguistic levels: phonetic, morphological and syntactic. Pretty interesting stuff.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mithridates



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Location: President's office, Korean Space Agency

PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2005 12:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The best hanja dictionary online:

http://zonmal.dreamwiz.com/

(I pm'ed you back just now Surprised )
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
stumptown



Joined: 11 Apr 2005
Location: Paju: Wife beating capital of Korea

PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2005 12:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great site!!! Thanks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
stumptown



Joined: 11 Apr 2005
Location: Paju: Wife beating capital of Korea

PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2005 12:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey! What is ? And what does the number represent?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mithridates



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Location: President's office, Korean Space Agency

PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2005 12:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

= (level), I assume. Is it talking about levels on the hanja test?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
stumptown



Joined: 11 Apr 2005
Location: Paju: Wife beating capital of Korea

PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2005 12:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How do you type hanja on your computer?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mithridates



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Location: President's office, Korean Space Agency

PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2005 12:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

With a Korean computer first you type in the hangeul and then click ctrl. You can type a whole word, move the cursor to the left of them and then click ctrl each time, selecting with the mouse.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
d503



Joined: 16 Oct 2004
Location: Daecheong, Seoul

PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2005 5:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey mith sorry, i have been lax on my dave's reading

my friends language consists of i think about 10-20 people, so not enough for wiki, though i am thinking of learning another constructed language, most of the ones created for the internet/increasing communication are user friendly and won't take long to at least master the basics. And for about the next six months I should have some mad time on my hand to do it.

any recomendations on ones to learn?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
mithridates



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Location: President's office, Korean Space Agency

PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2005 8:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Recommendations:
For a language that's kind of gay but actually used to talk to a large (comparatively) number of people, Esperanto. Maybe 500,000 people.
For Esperanto without the gayness, Ido. 1,000 people.
For a language that will likely change the entire way you think about things, Lojban. Almost 100 people.
(I haven't learned it yet but that's what it looks like)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
mithridates



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Location: President's office, Korean Space Agency

PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2005 8:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lojban is a constructed language. It was originally called Loglan by project founder Dr. James Cooke Brown, who started the language development in 1955. Loglan/Lojban has been built over four decades by dozens of workers and hundreds of supporters, led since 1987 by The Logical Language Group.

The following are the main features of Lojban:

* Lojban is designed to be used by people in communication with each other, and possibly in the future with computers.
* Lojban is designed to be culturally neutral.
* <@>Lojban grammar is based on the principles of logic.
* Lojban has an unambiguous grammar.
* Lojban has phonetic spelling, and unambiguous resolution of sounds into words.
* Lojban is simple compared to natural languages; it is easy to learn.
* Lojban's 1300 root words can be easily combined to form a vocabulary of millions of words.
* Lojban is regular; the rules of the language are without exception.
* Lojban attempts to remove restrictions on creative and clear thought and communication.
* Lojban has a variety of uses, ranging from the creative to the scientific, from the theoretical to the practical.

For more information on what Lojban is, and why people are learning it, see the Lojban Introductory Brochure.




Why Learn Lojban?
Several reasons for learning Lojban NOW

This is excerpted from the lojban brochure. Further suggestions are welcome, please send mail to the webmaster.

Those working with the language now are actively consulted for their opinions on how to teach and spread the language. People who write in the language are contributing to the growth of the lexicon, and establishing the conventions and idioms that will guide language use in future years. People who are especially active have joined the project leadership within a few months of becoming involved.

Those with a computer background can lead development of the first computer applications for the language. Expertise in the language will no doubt be valuable as Lojban becomes recognized as a useful tool for computer applications by the computer industry. Computer-oriented Lojbanists can also aid in developing computer-aided instruction tools or converting existing software to run on new computers.

Regardless of background, learning Lojban is a mind-expanding experience. Learning any language other than your native tongue broadens your perspectives and allows you to transcend the limited viewpoints of your native language culture. Lojban, being much simpler to learn than natural languages, provides this benefit much more quickly than does the study of other languages. Being so strongly different, the intensity of the effect seems to be heightened. When Lojbanists talk about language, the discussion has been observed to be more sophisticated as well as qualitatively different from the talk of students of second natural languages.

The logical organization embedded in Lojban aids in organizing and clarifying thoughts. Having done so, your new perspective on language, ambiguity, and communication will allow you to express those thoughts more clearly, even when you use an ambiguous natural language.

A relatively short study of Lojban by high school (or younger) students has been proposed, providing the linguistic understanding that was once associated with studying Latin and other languages for much longer periods of time. Such study can be tied in with concepts of logic, and possibly with computer-related activities, helping to show the essential interrelated nature of language and other human endeavor.

You needn't learn Lojban for any practical purpose, however. Many of those learning Lojban are doing so because it is fun. Learning Lojban is intellectually stimulating, and provides human interaction and mental challenge. Lojban has all the benefits of games designed for entertainment, with the added prospect of developing useful skills as a side benefit. Learning Lojban as an 'intellectual toy' means that you can get enjoyment from learning Lojban without nearly the effort needed to benefit from studying other languages. While becoming fluent in Lojban will probably take hundreds of hours over several months, you can feel some sense of accomplishment in the language after just a few hours of study. You can use Lojban immediately for fun, while gaining skill with greater experience.



Lojban looks like this:

Quote:
di'e ciksi prosa levi pemci cukta poi se tcita lu luryri'e li'u
.itu'efu'epe'icu'i zo pemci cu nibli fi la lojban. fe lesu'u lo ve pemci
pu'i ja nu'o zasti .ijonaibabo ciskycusku lo za'e valsi morna ni'o mi'o se
pemci fu'o .i ju'a naku zo'u lo se pemci cu se rinka po'o gonai le purci poi
xlura gi le larcu tcaci poi fange .i da poi ko'a goi lo bangu le tcini be
leko'a se bangu be'o po'u ma'i ge ge lo temci gi lo canlu gi loi sarcu ku'o
cu ckini tu'a ke'a ge'u zo'u da cfari gi'e mulgau vau le ko'a se pemci
nuncumki .i da nu'o se tcita lu le pevyxagji be lo steci xanri vau li'u to
ba'e po'o da snada merli lo larcu troci toi no'i lo poi fu'epe'a viska vo'a
sepi'o le minra fu'o pe le bi'unai valsi larcu ku'o ku'o tcidu ba vlipa je
cnino ve pemci tu'u
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Off-Topic Forum All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Page 3 of 4

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2013 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International