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Obtaining Korean Citizenship
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tob55



Joined: 29 Apr 2007

PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 7:34 pm    Post subject: Obtaining Korean Citizenship Reply with quote

Anyone have questions about the process and procedures for obtaining Korean citizenship, you can ask and those who have gone through the process, including myself, might be able to fill in the blanks for you. I hope this thread will not get derailed with non-related information as it is a topic that will hopefully be seen as useful, informative and helpful to expats wanting to take up life here in Korea. This is especially true in light of the fact that South Korea now has in place a dual citizenship policy with several countries. So, ask and we can provide some answers for you. Thanks
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tob55



Joined: 29 Apr 2007

PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Who's Your Daddy? wrote:
If one has an F visa, what is the benefit?

Are you exempt from drug testing or home country criminal background checks?

[The problems in my life are not visa related. Basically there are two, Ministry of Education, and no permanent jobs.]


Korean citizens are exempt from ALL the normal "foreigner" related checks because you are Korean. The background checks are not necessary since you are registered in their system (not true of any F-visa, even though you can get some things registered as part of the foreigner side of their system)

Of course and drug testing falls under the guidelines of the appropriate Ministry, but as far as drug testing, Korean citizens are not required to go through this procedure, except in special cases, so no more drug testing.

Also, job related hassles go away as you are no longer monitored by the MOE as foreigners are. Also, the regulations for permanent employment ARE different, even though the different agencies try to tell you they are not. You stand a much greater chance of obtaining permanent employment as a Korean national/dual citizen than by being on any of the F-visas.

Good questions, thanks for asking.
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Otherside



Joined: 06 Sep 2007

PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll get the ball rolling out of interest's sake.

What are the requirements to obtain Korean citizenship? Is it realistically possible without marrying a Korean (for someone without Korean heritage).

Did you have to change your name?
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tob55



Joined: 29 Apr 2007

PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Otherside wrote:
I'll get the ball rolling out of interest's sake.

What are the requirements to obtain Korean citizenship? Is it realistically possible without marrying a Korean (for someone without Korean heritage).

Did you have to change your name?


The requirements for obtaining citizenship are posted on the HiKorea website at the following link:

http://www.hikorea.go.kr/pt/InfoDetailR_en.pt?catSeq=457&categoryId=2&parentId=399&showMenuId=377

It is possible to obtain citizenship without marrying a Korean, but the requirements are a little more involved. Those married to Korean Nationals have an advantage in completing the process, but certain things are required of all those wanting to naturalize as a citizern of the country.

To answer your second question, I have my given name converted to Hangeul, which was okay since it was only 7 characters long in the Korean version. Typically, 7 characters is the limit they have for the length of a Korean name.
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TDC troll



Joined: 03 Feb 2009
Location: TDC

PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have gone through the naturalization process, including the last part ;
the oral interview.
After the interview, I was contacted by text message and told that I had passed.

My question is how long do I have to wait for now ?
I have been waiting for 3 months now.

Thanks.
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BigBuds



Joined: 15 Sep 2005
Location: Changwon

PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 1:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are they allowing you dual citizenship?

I've been here 12 years, married for almost ten, and have a son so I might look into if they allow dual citizenship.

There's no way I'm giving up my Aussie citizenship.
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big_fella1



Joined: 08 Dec 2005

PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 2:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow another Aussie in Changwon?

They allow dual citizenship to marriage migrants and limited others now, so you could still be Aussie.

To the earlier poster only some non-marriage migrants qualify for dual citizenship if you're an English teacher you would probably have to relinquish your original citizenship.
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tob55



Joined: 29 Apr 2007

PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 2:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TDC troll wrote:
I have gone through the naturalization process, including the last part ;
the oral interview.
After the interview, I was contacted by text message and told that I had passed.

My question is how long do I have to wait for now ?
I have been waiting for 3 months now.

Thanks.


Normally it depends on their backlog of applications. For myself and another friend it took seven months from the interview until the formal notice arrives in the mail. Be patient, because they are re-checking everything one more time to make sure it was all done correctly. This is where it can be unnerving, but it will be okay. You will also receive an SMS text telling you that this document will arrive to your home within ten days of its arrival. However, it takes about 3 - 5 days for it to actually arrive. Then it is a short process of going to your local office to begin processing everything. Once there you will receive a certificate from them allowing you to go to immigration for the last time to read the official oath indicating that you will abide by the laws and regulations of Korea and not use your home citizenship to escape criminal prosecution if you should ever get into trouble.

Then back to the local office to do your fingerprints, finish filling out forms and having your Korean national ID issued to you. You will receive a temporary ID in the form of an A4 sized paper, which will be good for thirty days. Between 15 - 21 days you should receive your regular Korean ID card, then everything is looking up from there. Cool
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TDC troll



Joined: 03 Feb 2009
Location: TDC

PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 3:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you so much for your prompt response.
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tob55



Joined: 29 Apr 2007

PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 4:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The dual citizenship rule doesn't just apply to those married to Korean nationals. Single individuals who go through the process of moving from the E2 visa in the case of English teachers, or other visas to the F-visas and ultimately to the residency visa, although it is not spelled out on the page for this type http://www.hikorea.go.kr/pt/InfoDetailR_en.pt can also obtain "general naturalization." Of course the rules are different and the time requirements may also be different, but ultimately the result will be the same. So there is a way for single individuals to obtain dual citizenship as well.

I recently learned that individuals on F-4 visas (Korean heritage visa) must be married to a Korean before being allowed to apply for naturalization. The reason given for this was that those individuals had previously renounced their citizenship already, and as a result they had to go through the same process as any foreign citizen applying for naturalization. Some sources will tell you otherwise, but upon hearing this directly from an F-4 individual I double checked with immigration and the person at immigration pulled out the regulations guide and looked it up for me. It is true.


Last edited by tob55 on Thu May 30, 2013 12:27 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Drew10



Joined: 31 Mar 2009

PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 7:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is there anything definitive for us youngsters within conscription age?

Meaning, if I obtain citizenship would I be conscripted, or is there even the possibility of it?

I already served in the U.S Army in Korea, I don't need to serve in the ROK Army.
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12ax7



Joined: 07 Nov 2009

PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 8:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's what Wikipedia has to say about the current policy concerning dual-citizenship:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Korean_nationality_law#Dual_citizenship
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tob55



Joined: 29 Apr 2007

PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Drew10 wrote:
Is there anything definitive for us youngsters within conscription age?

Meaning, if I obtain citizenship would I be conscripted, or is there even the possibility of it?

I already served in the U.S Army in Korea, I don't need to serve in the ROK Army.


You already served in the U.S. military and it would be my understanding that you would not have to serve again. At least that is my understanding from talking to others who are Korean citizens in a dual citizen relationship with the USA.
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alongway



Joined: 02 Jan 2012

PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Until recently even mixed kids weren't conscripted. I still don't think they are, they're only given the option of volunteering. A full blown non-ethnic korean likely wouldn't be conscripted any time soon.
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12ax7



Joined: 07 Nov 2009

PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alongway wrote:
Until recently even mixed kids weren't conscripted. I still don't think they are, they're only given the option of volunteering. A full blown non-ethnic korean likely wouldn't be conscripted any time soon.


Nope, they changed the law a couple of years ago. Multiethnic kids are made to waste 21-36 months of their lives like everybody else.
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