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Chosun University Korean Class

 
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katydid



Joined: 02 Feb 2003
Location: Here kitty kitty kitty...

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2003 5:33 am    Post subject: Chosun University Korean Class Reply with quote

OK, my apologies cause this is a regionally specific posting, but would anyone in the Gwangju area have any experience with the 8 hours a week/10-week/W400,000 Korean language course that Chosun University runs?
What books do they use? More importantly, how are the teachers? (I'm not gonna pay that much for someone to tell me my pronunciation is great when they really say that not to hurt my feelings). Did your Korean greatly improve after taking the course?

Thanks for your help!
Katy
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igotthisguitar



Joined: 08 Apr 2003
Location: South Korea (Permanent Vacation)

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2003 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

>. Hi Katy Smile

I've posted in response to this topic elsewhere in the past here & have yet to radically alter my position. My advice to you or for that matter any other foreigner interested in learning korean is really quite simple :

1) Forget about these phony language classes ( you're being had as really the cost is waaaaaayyyyyyy over the top AND when it comes right down to it, given the premium English conversation runs at in this country, your instructors should really be paying YOU just to attend ).

2) Pick up a dictionary & if you like a couple of basic work books. With an investment of only $40 or $50,000 won, these should keep you busy for a solid few months at least ( hangul btw is the simplest Asian language i've yet to come across ).

3 ) Teach yourself all the basics ( a little each day ) & if you like, from time to time simply ask your co-workers, along with the ppl you interact with over the course of a day, what certain words & expressions mean etc ...
( hangul btw is the simplest Asian language i've yet to come across ).

oh yah Laughing i pointed this out ALREADY now didn't i ???

Wink

Best of luck & remember ... don't sweat it.
Simply focus on taking your time in learning just a little, using some of Hanguk mal's basic everyday verbs and snatches of vocabulary. In no time flat you'll be able to order your food, give taxi drivers directions, and whatever else you feel you really need in order not only just to survive but also likely from time to time surprise Koreans themselves with your basic speaking & comprehension abilities.
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gang ah jee



Joined: 14 Jan 2003
Location: city of paper

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2003 7:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

igotthisguitar

i'll agree that hangul is the simplest asian writing system, but hangukmal is by no means simple. the phonemics system alone gives most english speakers a major headache.

also, it is possible to learn korean, even learn it well without classes, but practically everyone i've talked to who has done a well respected course has said that it has improved their Korean in a great hurry. I have never studied formally and I can get by fine with my Korean. That's not all I'd like to be able to do with it though - i would like to get truly fluent sooner as opposed to later. I'll be in a university course next semester.
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Manner of Speaking



Joined: 09 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2003 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

katy,

Do you have a weblink for that language program? Thanks in advance!

MOS
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The King of Kwangju



Joined: 10 Feb 2003
Location: New York City

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2003 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

igotthisguitar wrote:
1) Forget about these phony language classes ... when it comes right down to it, given the premium English conversation runs at in this country, your instructors should really be paying YOU just to attend ).

Therein lies the problem - you want to go to school to speak Korean, not teach your instructors English. As crazy as this may sound, it's way more efficient to pay for this opportunity, even in Korea.

I have a number of friends who studied K at the Uni level in K, and they all had the same lament - language exchanges don't work, and any half-assed stab at learning delivers half-assed results.

If you're serious about it, pay someone good money for "phony" language classes.

igotthisguitar wrote:
2) Pick up a dictionary & if you like a couple of basic work books.

If you're going to go this route, you will definitely need some workbooks, as you can't learn a language by a dictionary alone.

Unfortunately, most of the workbooks available are rotten and Koreans will laugh at you if you use the Korean therein.

"Pardon me, my fine fellow, but do you perchance have an inkling as to what hour of the day we are currently experiencing?"

igotthisguitar wrote:
( hangul btw is the simplest Asian language i've yet to come across ).

Bahasa Indonesia is written in the Roman alphabet and has no definite or indefinite articles or noun plural forms. There are also no present perfect, past or future tense verbs. It's spoken in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Brunei.

Pound for pound, you can't beat Indonesian.
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igotthisguitar



Joined: 08 Apr 2003
Location: South Korea (Permanent Vacation)

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2003 9:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

>. Like i'd expressed on an earlier similar related thread, everyone has their own reasons for learning Korean ( paying for it or otherwise ). Ranging from 100% fluency to simply speaking a few phrases ( enough to essentially get by in asking for directions, ordering food etc ), everyone has their own pace & vested language acquisition agenda.

Bottom line, if it really turns you on that much, put your $$$ down and go for it. I attended a couple of classes myself when i first blew onto the peninsula only to find the instructor rude, impatient & overbearing. Guess you could say he helped inspire me to ( in that typically western way ) essentially go it on my own Wink

Since this time, i've simply opted to learn more through a process of gradual osmosis and where i feel the need, referring any pressing queries to the round the clock services of my personal tutor & gf Laughing
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katydid



Joined: 02 Feb 2003
Location: Here kitty kitty kitty...

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2003 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi...

IGTG...I understand what you are saying, but really I KNOW myself to do much better in a classroom environment than to do any self study. Furthermore, the instruction I received in the past was good, but two of the three instructors I had were "guilty" of not correcting my pronunciation mistakes. I would then say what I learned in class, and be looked at quizzically.

I'm pretty good at giving taxi drivers directions and ordering food in restaurants and shopping....what I want to do is become more communicative in Korean, maybe one day read a newspaper or something, be able to talk with my Korean friends at all times, when they don't understand what I mean in English, I could then try to say it in Korean. I am also thinking of relocating to the Los Angeles area, whenever my trek in Korea is "finished"...knowing Korean in Southern California would be an asset, I think, when it comes to getting a job....color me naive, but knowing a language is possessing a skill.

Also, I admit it, I'm a social animal and I hope to meet some more people through this class.

By the way, the books used in Chosun's program are the from the Yonsei University series, and the classes have already started since last week, but if you sign up this week, they will accept you.

Katy
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Sliver



Joined: 04 May 2003
Location: The third dimension

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2003 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually studied on my own here for about a year but I don't have any problem with motivation. I find korean interesting, however, as you said some people require the formality of a class setting to provide motivation.

One point though. Because I did study primarily on my own for a year when I went to some volunteer classes I had developed some bad habbits in pronunciation. In korean prununciation is not only difficult at times but also very important.

The yonsei books are good for pronunciation practice with a Korean present if you want to do the drills in each chapter and yes some of the phrases are strange and not (pyo hyeon mal) standard expressions. Also I fouind the grammar explanations a little lacking (except from book four where there is no English at all and all explanations are in Korean - a little daunting at first but worth the effort). Yonsei does have an interesting if not cumbersome grammar/conversation book written by an American Fred Lukof. I found it useful but be warned this is an older text and so some of the phrases are outdated.

A better grammar book that has a workbook as well is "Korean Grammar for International Learners" written by Im Ho Bin ? et al.I am reading that one now and is more upto date.

Note the Sogang University website which is excelent and if you have a quiet place the listening section from intermediate levels provide a good chance to improve your listening skill (read listening is probably the hardest thing for me in learning Korean). Also, to improve your writing if you follow the assignments and submit them via email to Professor Chae he will correct and reply usually within two or three days. All this for free!!!

Anyway, one day I will take a Korean course too so good luck. I hope you find the right course for your tastes.
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enchoo



Joined: 04 Jul 2004
Location: Heading to a reality show near you

PostPosted: Sun Dec 19, 2010 4:49 am    Post subject: Excellent website to learn Korean!!! Reply with quote

korean.sogang.ac.kr
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