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Oriental Medicine

 
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dutchman



Joined: 23 Jan 2003
Location: My backyard

PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2003 6:00 pm    Post subject: Oriental Medicine Reply with quote

My son had a stye in his eye. If you've ever had one and gone to a western doctor, you know the advice given is simply to not touch it and put a warm compress on frequently. Well, my wife took our son to an Oriental doctor. She (the doctor) told my wife that many times a poor diet causes styes and that my son should not be eating a lot of flour based foods. Well, my wife is 8 months pregnant and obviously doesn't want to cook much. As a result, I've been feeding our son a lot of western foods (bread, pizza, hamburgers...) recently. So, the doctors advice seemed to make sense. The doctor then proceeded to take a needle and poke one of my son's big toes to let the blood flow out (a kind of bloodletting I guess). Pretty bizarre huh? Guess what. By the end of the day my sons stye had popped and is now disappearing.

I've always had a certain amount of respect for Oriental medicine but now I'm a true believer.

Anyone else have some stories on the subject?
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Hank Scorpio



Joined: 18 Jan 2003
Location: Ann Arbor, MI

PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2003 6:39 pm    Post subject: Re: Oriental Medicine Reply with quote

I don't know, I kind of consider Oriental medicine to be right up there with voodoo and santeria. I've just seen way too much superstitious nonsense coming from educated Koreans (fan death, anyone?) to trust some ancient eastern form of medicine. You're talking about medicine that uses rhinocerous horns, various animal t esticles (can't believe that word gets bleeped, c'mon, it's an actual anatomical term), and other junk. Meh.

Of course, I also have zero faith in holistic medicine, faith healing, crystals, or any other hippy dippy California fad. Chiropractors, though, I swear by. They may be witch doctors, but damnit, they work.
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posco's trumpet



Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Location: Beneath the Underdog

PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2003 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



Last edited by posco's trumpet on Sun Dec 07, 2003 2:53 am; edited 1 time in total
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desultude



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Location: Dangling my toes in the Persian Gulf

PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2003 11:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tell Cubans and Haitians that Santeria and VooDoo don't work. Some of the benefits of western medicine (how much depends on who you ask) come from what is derisively called the "placebo effect." There is much being said these days, sometimes in medical journals, about the benefits of prayer. It all gives new meaning to the adage "doctor heal thyself." A lot of healing is just that, healing yourself with a little help from the (witch) doctor.

I suspect that Dutchman's son was not too concerned with who the doctor was, but the Oriental practitioner seems to have performed a cure. Alls well that ends well, as they say.

I've been meaning to get my sinus problems checked out by a traditional medicine doctor here, as my western doctors can only give me drugs and advise surgury.
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TINKERBELL



Joined: 07 Apr 2003
Location: GWANGJU

PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2003 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had a stye on 2 occassions when I was younger. My Gran told me that rubbing a gold ring on it before it comes to a head, will cure it. She then proceeded to remove her wedding ring and rub it on my eye Shocked I am the ultimate cynic when it comes to these things but I have to say, it worked like a charm!
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the_beaver



Joined: 15 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2003 12:31 am    Post subject: Re: Oriental Medicine Reply with quote

dutchman wrote:
I've always had a certain amount of respect for Oriental medicine but now I'm a true believer.


As a general rule a stye will disappear on its own after a few days, and it's caused by bacteria, not wheat.

I personally agree with some of the other posters -- hocus pocus.
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rapier



Joined: 16 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2003 1:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I learned about this from a co-worker last week, it was very interesting. She had a headache..and then proceded to get out a needle gun and punture heer finger, and then bleed it.
She swears by this treatment for every ache and pain she gets. Apparently different points on the hand correspond to points on the body, and to massage or bleed these points will stimulate better circulation and rapid healing in the required part. I laughed out loud at this, but now I'm starting to take it seriously.
For muscular pains she uses a selection of strong suction cups applied to the suffering area. The suction actually causes bad or toxic blood to be sucked out through the skin and relieve the muscle. However the red skin mark left behind takes 2 weeks or so to dissapear. From what I've heard, its all very effective.
However I would discount as superstition some of their other remedies. I don't believe that eating kimchi prevents SARS or cancer.
Last week I told them I used to eat Kangaroo tails in Australia. They were very interested and asked what they were good for-ie, what medicinal value. I replied that they help you jump higher...
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dutchman



Joined: 23 Jan 2003
Location: My backyard

PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2003 1:42 am    Post subject: Re: Oriental Medicine Reply with quote

the_beaver wrote:
dutchman wrote:
I've always had a certain amount of respect for Oriental medicine but now I'm a true believer.


As a general rule a stye will disappear on its own after a few days, and it's caused by bacteria, not wheat.

I personally agree with some of the other posters -- hocus pocus.


My son had the stye for a week. It came to a head and popped on the very same day he went to the doctor. Coincidence? Maybe but why is it so much easier for you to believe the bacteria theory over the flour theory? Do you think western science has a monopoly on the truth? Oriental doctors have been saying for centuries that green tea prevents diseases. Western science has just now figured it out.
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the_beaver



Joined: 15 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2003 6:25 am    Post subject: Re: Oriental Medicine Reply with quote

dutchman wrote:
. . .why is it so much easier for you to believe the bacteria theory over the flour theory? Do you think western science has a monopoly on the truth? Oriental doctors have been saying for centuries that green tea prevents diseases. Western science has just now figured it out.


Back in the day (back a few hundred years) Koreans would encourage their sons and daughters to smoke in the belief that it killed stomach parasites. Even today, in the Korean countryside, baby teeth are thrown over the roof in the belief that it will make the adult teeth come in straight.

Korea doesn't have a monoply on silly beliefs. My mother (who grew up on a small island) believed (maybe she still does) that getting rid of warts can be accomplished by wrapping a potato in an old sock or bag, whirling it around your head, and letting it fly.

Western culture had, and still has, in some places and with some people, a host of Gramma's cures, and, while they were largely displaced that's not to say that they were all wrong. Asia's equivalent of Gramma's cures are still hanging strong, and I don't believe that they're all wrong (perhaps 'hocus-pocus' was too strong), BUT, I'm much more inclined to go with the medicinal beliefs of the culture(s) that gave us penicillin, epinephrin, the smallpox vaccine, the polo vaccine, flu shots, open-heart surgery, and blood transfusions than the culture that believes that fans can kill you while you sleep, the longer a dog remains alive while being beaten the more potent an effect the resulting meat will have in maintaining a stiffy, and that drinking water with a meal creates toxicity in the food which is being eaten.
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wormholes101



Joined: 11 Mar 2003

PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2003 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This shouldn't be a western medicine VS oriental medicine thread.

99.95% of the time I'm a skeptic and a scientist. I'm sure a lot of Oreintal medicine is bollocks. However, I do have one story to tell.

I occasionally have an allergic reaction after eating large quantities of crustaceans or any amount of insects. Red skin and swelling. I had it the first time in Thailand after eating some type of lavae. The reaction lasted all night even after a shot of anti-hystimine. A few weeks later while in Malaysia, I ate several crabs and again got a reaction. My step mother swabbed my down with plum wine and the swelling completely dissapeared within a hour. I've had the reaction a few times after that and never has it subsided as quick as with the plum wine.

Who knows? I think that it can't ALL be quackery. In 5000 years of oriental medicine, they must have got something right.

Interestingly, University studies indicate that eating Deer Velvet (this is a traditional medicine) may increase muscular strength and endurance when combined with a exercise program.

abstract wrote:
ABSTRACT In order to determine any effects of deer antler velvet extract or powder supplementation on the trainability of muscular strength and endurance, fifty-one active male subjects between 19-24 years old were randomly assigned in a double blind fashion to either deer velvet extract (300 mg/day), deer velvet powder (1.5 g/day) or placebo groups. Subjects were tested prior to beginning supplementation and a 10 week strength program and immediately after the completion of the training program. The training program consisted of 3 sessions/week and in each session subjects completed 3 sets of 8 RM parallel squats and 3 sets of ten maximal knee extension/flexion repetitions on an isokinetic dynamometer at 1.05 rad/s. There were no changes in body mass or sum of 8 skinfolds for any group. All groups improved 6 repetition maximum strength substantially (41 26%, P<0.001) but there were no differences in the extent of change between groups. Similarly, all groups improved isokinetic strength (21 17%, P<0.001) and isokinetic endurance (13 14%, P<0.001) but there was a greater increase in strength (30 21% vs 13 15%, P=0.04) and muscular endurance (21 19% vs 7 12%, P=0.02) in the powder group compared to the placebo group. There were no changes in blood levels of testosterone or insulin-like growth factor in any group. Deer velvet powder may have ergogenic properties but further work is required to test the robustness of this finding and elucidate mechanisms.
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Len8



Joined: 12 Feb 2003
Location: Kyungju

PostPosted: Sun Jun 08, 2003 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oriental Medicine is big buisness here, but it's also very cheap. Acupuncture in the U.S. is $70 a shot. Here it's $5.

It's too bad that their Bible of Oriental Medicine hasn't been translated into English. It would be a big money spnner. it contains all the herbal cures from the days of "Hogin" the benevolent doctor depicted on the Korean drama series that ran for a couple of years back.

I lived near Kyunghee University for a couple of years, and got to hang out with some of the oriental medical students. I was fascinated with how they learned their acupuncture. Some learened first hand by practicing on themselves, and others practiced on each other. Poor guys had needle marks all over their bodies.
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