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humorous attempts at korean

 
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hojucandy



Joined: 03 Feb 2003
Location: In a better place

PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2003 6:58 pm    Post subject: humorous attempts at korean Reply with quote

i just read a post to the thread "dealing with the hello question" about a child saying "hello haseiyo". it reminds me of a bit of half-korean i heard one boozy night last year in a bar in shi-hwa, uttered by an irish fellow who calimed to have excellent korean....

the waiter had just attended to our drinking requisites, and this fellow leaned over and, gesturing to the waiter's shirt, said to him "nice shirt imnida".

i have saved this little gem for a year, and finally had the opportunity to say it last night!

anyone have any similar phrases?
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denz



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Location: soapland. alternatively - the school of rock!

PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2003 9:33 pm    Post subject: yesh well Reply with quote

word imnikka?

i sometimes say "hellobusayo" when i answer the phone, but i don't have a phone no mo'.

denz
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gang ah jee



Joined: 14 Jan 2003
Location: city of paper

PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2003 11:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i used to use 'helloseyo' and 'anyounghi gyesee-ya-later!'
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Zyzyfer



Joined: 29 Jan 2003
Location: who, what, where, when, why, how?

PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2003 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heard this one through the grapevine. Some cats I knew went down to check out the Science Expo in Daejeon, and got there late in the afternoon. They wanted to ask what time the place closed down, but in Korean, and one of them says, "It's okay, I got this one." So he walks up, points at his watch, and says, "What time finishi?"

Such beautiful Korean~
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Sliver



Joined: 04 May 2003
Location: The third dimension

PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2003 1:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK BUDDY IMNIDA

and

First week in Korea I was travelling around with my phrase book and used to always here ososayo when I entered a shop, so, i thought initially it was Korean for hello and hence would say it back.

In translation

Shop keeper: welcome please come in.

Me: welcome please come in.


Dahhhh Rolling Eyes
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Son Deureo!



Joined: 30 Apr 2003

PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2003 4:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Me in a Mexican restaurant: "Seolsa jom juseyo" Translation: Please give me some diarrhea.

Making matters worse, this was on a first date with a Korean girl. The good news: we're still together! Cool
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SweetBear



Joined: 18 May 2003

PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2003 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My first week in Korea on a six hour bus trip to Busan, I was begging the bus driver to stop so I could go to the hagwonsil.
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jajdude



Joined: 18 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2003 4:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I tried to say "absolutlely not" in Korean and the high school class cracked up. A guy there said the way I said it, sounded like "F*** off" or something just as bad. Anyone know the difference?
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Circus Monkey



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Location: In my coconut tree

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2003 5:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I was dating my girlfriend (now wife) I used to answer the phone, "Yobo yobo yobo yoboseyo?" for fun. She would get all gigggly. Only later did I found out that "yobo" meant "darling".

CM
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Cedar



Joined: 11 Mar 2003
Location: In front of my computer, again.

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2003 5:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I had been in Korea about 3 months and was just learning Hapkido I go this incredibly painful overworked joint in my hip. I wanted to tell my instructor that it hurt. So I asked my hagwon supervisor how to say "My hip joint hurts." He told me that in Korean they wouldn't need to say "joint", and taught me my phrase. I was actually in a lot of pain, so I practiced by saying it to several people.

Maybe you can guess, knowing how Koreans use the word hip when we would say "butt"... he taught me to say "My a-ss hurts." and of course I was chortling it to everyone I knew, so impressed with my great new Korean phrase. I didn't learn I'd been misled until long after he'd parted ways with the hagwon, and when I did man was I emberassed.

Oh... and I was taught that okay is "choe-ta" (good), so when some kid on the street playing soccer accidentally beaned me with the ball and said sorry I responded with "good" when of course I wanted to be saying "kwaenchanah". That was after maybe one month in Korea.

Almost all the difficulties I've had learning Korean have to do with asking Koreans how to speak the language... their grasp of English is not always sufficient to teach properly, but especially English teaching co-workers who supposedly know English well are afraid to ever say "I don't know" or "I don't understand".
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gang ah jee



Joined: 14 Jan 2003
Location: city of paper

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2003 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i've written this in so many other threads

i came to korea 2 months after my best friend. he spent a lot of time showing me around and getting me up to speed with basic korean. i knew enough, even a few days after i arrived, to know the difference between ajossi and agassi. my friend didn't. i hated having to tell him.

just like i also hated having to tell him that:

-you can only say oppa if you're a chick

-you can not use oso oseyo to say 'hello'

-you don't need to dance on the street to flag a taxi.

he worked out ok though... kinda... left korea vowing never to return. he'll be back though.
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Jensen



Joined: 30 Mar 2003
Location: hippie hell

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2003 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I remember saying "nan key opso" to my wife one time when we were riding in a friend's car back to our apartment... I was trying to say I didn't have the key, wasn't refering to my lack of ears, or cuteness. Have made many worse mistakes but I've subliminated most of them. One time I called a company trying to order some propane and the guy told me to sober up and call back when I could talk straight.
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makushi



Joined: 08 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2003 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just a couple of weeks ago some Korean friends asked what my wife was preparing for dinner and I proudly replied "ko mul guk" (nose water soup or snot soup). My friends were obvousily a bit confused and weren't too eager to join us for our evening meal. After calling my wife, I was able to inform my friends that we were really eating "kong namul guk" (bean sprout soup), which made all of us feel a little better.

My wife's favorite though, is that I used to always order "Yum Yum" Chicken at the local Donkey Fried Chicken Hof...of course I now realize it's "Yang Yum Chicken." Not much of a difference to me, but her whole family cracks everytime this is mentioned, which seems to be a lot.

It's all good though...cuz on our last trip to the states my wife ordered "steak and robster"....not that was funny!
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Tiberious aka Sparkles



Joined: 23 Jan 2003
Location: I'm one cool cat!

PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2003 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Son Deureo! wrote:
Me in a Mexican restaurant: "Seolsa jom juseyo" Translation: Please give me some diarrhea.


Just a quick note that if you use the word jom, you are pretty much at the level of begging. Koreans don't use this, and it infuriates me that they teach foreigners to.
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kangnamdragon



Joined: 17 Jan 2003
Location: Kangnam, Seoul, Korea

PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2003 11:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

one time a friend thought I called "dalk ta ri tang" (a kind of chicken soup) "da da ri tang". "da da ri" is something you'll have to ask about, but it is usually done alone with an illegal magazine, etc.
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