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what's the deal with teaching adults?
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Captain Zoom



Joined: 23 Apr 2003
Location: Tokyo

PostPosted: Mon Jul 21, 2003 7:45 pm    Post subject: what's the deal with teaching adults? Reply with quote

Hi folks,

I'm wondering about teaching adult classes in Korea. Most people on the board seem to teach children and I've heard that the adult jobs aren't that great (lower pay, inconvenient hours, harder to find, etc.). I know that there are universities, but are there decent jobs teaching adult classes in private schools (sort of similar to the way things work in Japan)?

Cheers,

Zoom.
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waterbaby



Joined: 01 Feb 2003
Location: Baking Gord a Cheescake pie

PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2003 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Take a look at the new FAQ page on the Q&A Forum and scroll down a bit... I've compiled a lot links that you might find useful...

Here's the list of links for teaching adults...

What about teaching Adults?

1. Are There Many Jobs Around That Teach Older Kids and Adults
2. Which Schools Specialize in Teaching Executives?
3. Teaching Adults
4. Overwhelmed By Information
5. If You Think Kids are Hard!
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Butterfly



Joined: 02 Mar 2003
Location: Kuwait

PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2003 10:35 pm    Post subject: Re: what's the deal with teaching adults? Reply with quote

Captain Zoom wrote:
Hi folks,

I'm wondering about teaching adult classes in Korea. Most people on the board seem to teach children and I've heard that the adult jobs aren't that great (lower pay, inconvenient hours, harder to find, etc.). I know that there are universities, but are there decent jobs teaching adult classes in private schools (sort of similar to the way things work in Japan)?

Cheers,

Zoom.


Zoom. I would like to list the benefits of teaching adults for you and a couple of warning shots.

1. You get to make more Korean friends and contacts. Huge networking potential.

2. You get approached to do cool privates with high paying executives - which compensates for a slightly lower salary (maybe 15% on average).

3. You dont have to have any contact whatsover with children of any kind

4. You get a more balanced and interactive perspective on Korea and Korean society, because you talk to Korean adults and often befriend them, ultimately realizing that people are pretty much the same wherever you go

5. You pulling net is cast wider, you spend time with beautiful and attractive women almost all of your working day

6. You learn things from interacting with adults from different fields of industry and life. Learn about logistics. Learn about East Asian art. Learn about nutrition. Learn about business. This is just a list of topics on which I learned at least something this week.

7. You get to teach people who want to be there.

Warning shots:

1. You got to be good, likeable, and know what you are doing.

2. You got to look good, not necessarily handsome, but well-dressed. They notice.

3. If you get a couple of complaints you're on a downward spiral that its hard to come back from. Students gossip about you and dont want to be in your class, your confidence is effected, the hakwon owner starts not to like you... Basically you got to do a lot of lesson planning and you got to stay ahead of your game.
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djsmnc



Joined: 20 Jan 2003
Location: Dave's ESL Cafe

PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2003 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wha he said...

I have experience teaching both, and honestly, I think if you really want to feel like you are working at a somewhat respectable and legitimate career, then teaching adults is the way to go. It's easy to meet some great people and experience the culture.
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sparkx



Joined: 16 Jan 2003
Location: thekimchipot.com

PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2003 4:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not to mention the whole split-shift thing. Although I have learned to cope there are some that simply can't take getting up at 5:30 am and teaching till 9:30 pm. Personally, I have actually found that those hours keep me in check. I never go out drinking during the week and as a result have a more professional attitude about my job which makes it more gratifying (which honestly, I rarely hear from friends teaching children) . That said, I will NEVER teach kids in any capacity after spending a year teaching adults. When you teach a high level free talking class you feel like a professor or at the very least Barbera Walters.
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rapier



Joined: 16 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2003 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've taught adults as well as kids- and I actually prefer kids. With adults you have to work that much harder- its all focus and concentration. if you go off track or deviate, they notice and start sighing etc. Its all stress and tension. they have all their different politics going on..they're all expert teachers with firm opinions as to how to teach a lesson.
Kids- you can kick back and play around, enjoy and have a laugh..
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FierceInvalid



Joined: 16 Mar 2003

PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2003 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really want to make the switch from kids to adults but know myself too well to think I can handle the splits. Japan is starting to look better and better.
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JackSarang



Joined: 28 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2003 11:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Honestly, I find working with adults just that -- work. And you end up with 100x more criticism. Working with elementary students is my preference. Because a) I'm a lazy teacher and b) I actually feel like I make progress with them. When I taught adults I got zero satisfaction except for the fact that I was teaching housewives and I got incredible insight into their lives (they were very open with me).

Not to mention the fact that hogwan adult jobs are always hellish splitshifts... usually 6:30-9am then again from 6pm-10pm. Not my idea of fun.
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The Cube



Joined: 01 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2003 1:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

..

Last edited by The Cube on Wed Dec 10, 2008 11:22 am; edited 1 time in total
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sparkx



Joined: 16 Jan 2003
Location: thekimchipot.com

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2003 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found this to be the case my first few months teaching adults until I adpoted a whole new attitude. I began to see teaching like bartending -- "this is my bar and I am the one serving you -- I call the shots!" Surprisingly, the effectiveness of this was greater than I could have expected. Many older Koreans have a nostalgic outlook on their days in middle and high school even though they were beaten and yelled at constantly. I am not exactly an authoritarian in my classroom (I still joke a lot and have fun) but I do make it crystal clear that I am calling the shots and there is zero room for debate on the issue. I haven't had a complaint in 6 months and my classes are always at maximum capacity. Maybe I'm just lucky though.
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kimcheeking
Guest




PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2003 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Cube wrote:
Not to mention the annoying invites to dinner, etc.. that you feel you can't turn down. The personal questions in the classroom are really annoying too.


I had no problem turning down invites for dinners etc... I set one day a month to go out as a class and we always voted on what to do. I also said that I would not drink more than one drink in a night and if they started pressuring me I would leave. I left twice in 1.5 years. Was not a problem.
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Howard Roark



Joined: 02 Feb 2003
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2003 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I taught kids my first year here. I enjoyed it at times I suppose, but by the end it was pretty boring and unrewarding. I didn't make many Korean friends. The only Korean adults I was really exposed to were the people on the sreet and a few teachers at my school.
I'm now in my second year and my second job. I work at LG, teaching executives and office workers. I feel like I missed a lot last year. There was this whole other side to Korea that I never got to know. Everyone here speaks English. I have a desk and a computer. I sit in a big office with the Korean office staff. Only a few are my students but they have all become my friends. They're very kind and helpful to me. Last year I felt like I had nobody to ask a question to or turn to if I had a problem. Now I have a lot of people willing to help me anytime I ask.
Also, someone metioned that teaching adults feels more like a real, professional job. That's so true. I agree completely. To actually speak and be understood is an experience I could not have apprciated 2 years ago. The students are enthusiastic and they feel English is important.
On one hand, classes are usually interesting and easy so it doesn't even feel like work. I don't work split shifts. I work from 8am - 3pm. The LG bus picks me up and brings me home. I get free lunch at the company also. It's a pretty good deal. I'm also making more than I was teaching kids. I teach only 3 classes a day at the company. My salary is 2M.
On the other hand, it does take planning and preparation. It's sometimes a challenge to keep it interesting and productive. You must dress and act very professional. I guess the dressing up part is the thing I hate most, but some people like that.
The best part is that I'm finished at 3pm so I have a lot of time to make lots of extra cash, which I do. I also work at a hagwan (legally) in the evenings. Just teaching 2 classes a day at my hagwan brings my pay up to 2.8M - not bad hey?
Last year I taught 7 classes of screaming kids and apathetic teens for 1.8. I definitely prefer my current situation.
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qwunk89



Joined: 16 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2003 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Howard Roark, is that Mike Gordon?
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Howard Roark



Joined: 02 Feb 2003
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2003 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You mean my avatar? It's Syd Barrett.
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rapier



Joined: 16 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2003 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I guess some of us are just too laid back to dress up and act proffessional. I prefer my finger painting.
I guess what puts me off most about teaching adults is living up to their expectations. I like to please, and it seems harder to do this with adults than kiddies.
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