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How much discrimination is reasonable?

 
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cam83



Joined: 27 Jan 2013
Location: Seoul, South Korea

PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 9:04 pm    Post subject: How much discrimination is reasonable? Reply with quote

http://www.scribd.com/doc/23764454/Scrutinizing-Rules-for-Foreigners-in-Korea-How-Much-Discrimination-is-Reasonable

This an interesting piece that come from the perspective of Koreans and foreigners regarding the legal/social system against 'foreigners' no matter how long you've been here.

A few extracts:

"A group of old women shuffle up to the subway ticket window to collect afree ticket provided by the Korean government for people over 65. But as Ms.Sonia Strawn reaches for one she is denied. Even though she has been a resident of Korea for “more than 40 years” – as a “foreigner” she is ineligible."

"Our daughter holds both British and Korean citizenship, and her birth has been registered in both countries. In the UK, her birth certificate shows thename of both parents, regardless of the fact that my wife has no right toresidency in the UK. In Korea, this is not the case.

The dong office [has]informed my wife that I may not be included as a parent to our daughter,despite the fact that my wife and I are legally married under Korean law.The reason given is that I am a foreigner . . . If I was Korean, my rights as a father would be secure.

The official response from the Ministry of Public Administration and Securityexplained:

Clause 1, Article 6, the Resident registration law implies foreigners are not a member of registration in Korea. The Resident registration system was made to record and manage the residence record of Korean, not for foreigners."


Has anyone with a family experienced this?

personally, I have only had experience with one of the mentioned scenario's (credit card) and the only reason I was given one is because I had to spend so much time getting ALL previous and current work contracts together and had to put down a hefty deposit... and even after that I only have 3mil KRW limit Sad

Anyway, I though some of you would find it insightful. Have an awesome weekend folks Smile
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FriendlyDaegu



Joined: 26 Aug 2012

PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 9:26 pm    Post subject: Re: How much discrimination is reasonable? Reply with quote

cam83 wrote:
...
"Our daughter holds both British and Korean citizenship, and her birth has been registered in both countries. In the UK, her birth certificate shows thename of both parents, regardless of the fact that my wife has no right toresidency in the UK. In Korea, this is not the case.

The dong office [has]informed my wife that I may not be included as a parent to our daughter,despite the fact that my wife and I are legally married under Korean law.The reason given is that I am a foreigner . . . If I was Korean, my rights as a father would be secure.

The official response from the Ministry of Public Administration and Securityexplained:

Clause 1, Article 6, the Resident registration law implies foreigners are not a member of registration in Korea. The Resident registration system was made to record and manage the residence record of Korean, not for foreigners."


Has anyone with a family experienced this?


I agree that the resident registration should include all residents, or at least permanent residents, but the comparison above is not accurate. Foreigners are listed on Korean birth certificates as parents in the same manner as citizens, AFAIK.
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cam83



Joined: 27 Jan 2013
Location: Seoul, South Korea

PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 9:36 pm    Post subject: Re: How much discrimination is reasonable? Reply with quote

FriendlyDaegu wrote:
cam83 wrote:
...
"Our daughter holds both British and Korean citizenship, and her birth has been registered in both countries. In the UK, her birth certificate shows thename of both parents, regardless of the fact that my wife has no right toresidency in the UK. In Korea, this is not the case.

The dong office [has]informed my wife that I may not be included as a parent to our daughter,despite the fact that my wife and I are legally married under Korean law.The reason given is that I am a foreigner . . . If I was Korean, my rights as a father would be secure.

The official response from the Ministry of Public Administration and Securityexplained:

Clause 1, Article 6, the Resident registration law implies foreigners are not a member of registration in Korea. The Resident registration system was made to record and manage the residence record of Korean, not for foreigners."


Has anyone with a family experienced this?


I agree that the resident registration should include all residents, or at least permanent residents, but the comparison above is not accurate. Foreigners are listed on Korean birth certificates as parents in the same manner as citizens, AFAIK.


Oh really... well the article is 5yrs old so it's good to know some improvements are being made. I do wonder though... is the fathers name just on the certificate or is it actually on the Korean registry?
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Who's Your Daddy?



Joined: 30 May 2010
Location: The joy's in the ride.

PostPosted: Fri Nov 22, 2013 12:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am a father of a two year old. My name doesn't appear in the area that a Korean fathers' would. My name is added along the bottom of the form upon my request. But, if I didn't request my name to be added manually along the bottom by the clerk, I wouldn't appear on the form. I had this form issued 3 months ago.
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PatrickGHBusan



Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Location: Busan (1997-2008) Canada 2008 -

PostPosted: Fri Nov 22, 2013 4:14 am    Post subject: Re: How much discrimination is reasonable? Reply with quote

cam83 wrote:
FriendlyDaegu wrote:
cam83 wrote:
...
"Our daughter holds both British and Korean citizenship, and her birth has been registered in both countries. In the UK, her birth certificate shows thename of both parents, regardless of the fact that my wife has no right toresidency in the UK. In Korea, this is not the case.

The dong office [has]informed my wife that I may not be included as a parent to our daughter,despite the fact that my wife and I are legally married under Korean law.The reason given is that I am a foreigner . . . If I was Korean, my rights as a father would be secure.

The official response from the Ministry of Public Administration and Securityexplained:

Clause 1, Article 6, the Resident registration law implies foreigners are not a member of registration in Korea. The Resident registration system was made to record and manage the residence record of Korean, not for foreigners."


Has anyone with a family experienced this?


I agree that the resident registration should include all residents, or at least permanent residents, but the comparison above is not accurate. Foreigners are listed on Korean birth certificates as parents in the same manner as citizens, AFAIK.


Oh really... well the article is 5yrs old so it's good to know some improvements are being made. I do wonder though... is the fathers name just on the certificate or is it actually on the Korean registry?


Our son was born in Korea in 2005. My name was on all the documents and in the registry. It did take some work but it was there.

It is however sad that a resident of 40 years gets denied like that. I am certain she could make a case and get the free tickets but it should be automatic if she has proof of her residency.
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cam83



Joined: 27 Jan 2013
Location: Seoul, South Korea

PostPosted: Sun Nov 24, 2013 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the intel, i had a few discussions with my gf about our future and if children are on the cards, where would be best to have them be born (london or seoul)... this was an issue raised along with the obvious ones (education, costs etc) so it's to hear from those with first hand experience.
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andrewchon



Joined: 16 Nov 2008
Location: In my goshiwon cubicle. Seeking moksha.

PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2013 6:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Answer to that question is: USA is the leading light on that (and everything else) so discrimination USA style is enough. Laughing

1. Stand your ground: anyone not pretty (white) is a criminal coming to kill you.
2. Poor, sick, and disabled are lazy: eff-off and die moochers.
3. government is anti-God:

Korea has SOOOOO much to learn from that place. Laughing
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