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Documents needed for the F-4 VISA?
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homer521



Joined: 24 Mar 2003
Location: Seoul (prev Fairfax, VA)

PostPosted: Fri Sep 19, 2003 6:02 pm    Post subject: Documents needed for the F-4 VISA? Reply with quote

Hello again all,

Sorry to keep annoying you guys Wink Can anyone please help clarify what documents I need for an F-4 Visa? I tried doing a search at this site for f4/f-4 but nothing came up. I got some general info from the website below, but it's still kind of vague.
http://www.koreagyopo.com/info_f4.html

I was born and raised in the States so I never held a Korean citizenship (atleast I think)...

1) Do I just need to provide documents that prove my parent's ex-Korean nationality, and is there a name for it? Do I also need another document from my parent giving a reason why they obtained a U.S. citizenship?

2) Do I need a teaching contract first or some other document substantiating my reason for going?

3) Is the family registry pretty much a record of my family tree, and would I even be included in it if I was born in the States? If I do need it, anyone know where can I get it?

Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks.
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CanKorea



Joined: 23 Jun 2003
Location: Pyeongchon

PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2003 6:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi again Homer, I'll try to give you some tips on the F-4, I know that the information is vague on the sites. I tried reading through them all too.

To get the F-4 before you arrive in Korea is somewhat complex. Are you registered in Korea? My grandfather registered me when I was born. If you are and your parents never formally denounced their Korean citizenship then you will have problems. You had to have denounced your Korean status before you were 18. Why you can't do it after that age is beyond me. So, if you are registered and your parents didn't denounce, it's much easier to get the visa once you're in Korea.

If you're not registered I'm not sure what the procedure is. Sorry. Check with the consulate, they'll tell you.

Like I said before, if you're in Korea it's much easier. But, if you are on your father's "ho juk deung bon" this creates even more problems! I was on my father's so we had to get more documents. I recommend that you definitely bring your birth certificate. I needed to obtain the "large" birth certificate, the one with my parents and my name on it. I also needed a copy of my father's citizenship declaration, the photocopy of his card wasn't enough. You will also need a copy of your father's passport picture and signature page. The ho juk deung bon can be obtained easily enough in Korea. As you can probably tell, your mother's nationality doesn't seem to matter much. I think those are all the necessary documents I needed when I went to Immigration in Seoul. We had to go twice because the 1st time no one realized I was on the ho juk.

And the immigration people did ask if I was working, they needed the address and phone number of the school.
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homer521



Joined: 24 Mar 2003
Location: Seoul (prev Fairfax, VA)

PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2003 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey CanKorea,

It's great to see you on here helping me and others out. Thanks bud.

I'll assume the "ho juk deung bon" is the family registry. I'm finding out if I'm in the registry, then I'll call my consulate to find out what I'll need. Thanks a lot for all your help!
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Seoul Skye



Joined: 28 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2003 4:42 pm    Post subject: F-4 Application Info. Reply with quote

The following is a list of the required documents for F-4 visa application:

- application for visa
- passport
- two copies of passport
- 2 original copies of the family register (published within 3 months)*
- two photos (3cm X 4cm)
- two copies of your certificate of citizenship
- fee: KW 60,000 won
- If name on passport & register differ, substantiating documents identifying applicant as the same person
- If the applicant is a male between the ages of 18 - 35, he must provide proof that he has given up his Korean citizenship. (If you're listed on the family register and you have not formally renounced your Korean citizenship, DO NOT try to apply for anything other than a tourist visa. Technically, you are still required to serve in the Korean military and, if they catch you, that's where you will be for a minimum of 27 months.)

* To apply for your family registry (there are several offices in every city)
1) Fatherís name, Korean I.D. number, place of birth or mother's name, I.D. etc.
2) If applicant was born in Korea, family's address at time of birth
3) Birth certificate establishing relationship to your parents
4) If one of your parents names, as they appears on your birth certificate, differ from the family register, you must provide documents substantiating the name change
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casinoman



Joined: 12 Sep 2003
Location: seoul

PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2003 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

well i just got through the day trying to get my f4 visa. seoul skye you're scaring me with this military service obligation. basically i was born in seoul but my parents immigrated to canada. first of all the hojuck can be obtained from a dosun muso (local government offices) which are in each district in seoul. so to het this homer you have to know which district your parents lived in before they emigrated. this can be further complicated by the fact that some districts have more than one office. so after going to the seoul immigration office, i was told that i had to formally renounce my korean citizenship. this is easy enough to do as the ministry of justice has a counter on the first floor. however, my proof of canadian citizenship was not enough, i had to go to the canadian embassy to get some sort of letter that states when my canadian citizenship was granted (cost 42,500 won). seoul skye where did you get this information as to the obligation for military service? i'll admit that i have heard of this and my heart did skip a beat when i was told that technically i was a "dual citizen" even though the korean government does not recognize this. homer, if your name is on your family's hojuck, you are technically considered a korean citizen (even if you were not born in korea). so i am currently waiting for this document from the canadian embassy before i can proceed. i do believe it is easier to get this visa while in korea though as the korean consulate in vancouver told me that all this documentation had to be processed in korea anyway. hope some of this helps.
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Seoul Skye



Joined: 28 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2003 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry the military service issue gave you a scare but it's quite true. I have this straight from Immigration and legal professionals. There is a "test case" in Korean courts right now (pending) that inolves an American who was born in the States but his grandfather entered his name on the family registry without the rest of the family's knowledge. Since he didn't know that he was officially listed as a Korean citizen, he didn't renounce said citizenship before his 18th birthday. The Korean government is maintaining that he belongs in the army.

I'm more familar with the cases of Korean-American men and most of them simply stay in Korea on tourist visas. They can do so up to 5 years. Perhaps it's different for Canadians.
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casinoman



Joined: 12 Sep 2003
Location: seoul

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2003 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seoul Skye can you tell me if the Korean government considers obtaining foreign citizenship to be renouncing Korean citizenship? When I went to the Ministry of Justice counter (first floor at Immigration Office) he told me to get a document from the Canadian Embassy. The Visa Issuance section did say that technically I am a dual citizen and that I had to renounce my Korean citizenship in order to obtain this F4 visa (after all they wouldn't grant this visa to someone who is a "citizen" would they). My question to you then is why didn't the guys at the Ministry of Justice counter haul my ass down to get drafted. I have read something about what you said on some US government website (possibly State Dept.).
Please let me know. Cheers.
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casinoman



Joined: 12 Sep 2003
Location: seoul

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2003 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Found a website that deals with this military obligation issue:

www.moj.go.kr/immi/08_english/03_board/free_list_f.html

Although it's hard for me to make out the legalese completely, I think the section that states:

"A dual nationality holder shall choose one nationality before his/her age of 22 years. If he/she reports for it before his/her choice of one nationality, a dual nationality holder will be treated the same as a Korean national exempted from the foreigner's obligations such as foreign registration. However, he/she shall use a Korean passport for his/her travel abroad. A dual nationality holder who does not apply for it shall use a foreign passport for his/her travel abroad and is treated as a foreigner."

would exempt one from military service. Seoul Skye, any comments?
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Seoul Skye



Joined: 28 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Sun Sep 28, 2003 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Casinoman, there are several shades of grey existing around this issue. The fact that you were born in Seoul but nationalized in Canada is definitely in your favor. Do you have the original naturalization documents? If not, follow the advice of the MOJ and obtain that certificate from your Embassy.

Of the many stories I've heard, the one thing that strikes me as being the most frustrating is the lack of consistency in the way they (Immigration, MOJ, Military Manpower Office) apply laws and regulations. Best wishes!
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casinoman



Joined: 12 Sep 2003
Location: seoul

PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2003 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just got back from Immigration and can pick up my visa next week. Actually I think that they could have given me a visa today but during the process the Immigration officer automatically made me apply for an Alien Registration Card at the same time. So I should be able to pick up my visa next week. I am also happy to say that I do not have to serve in the military and face off with the North Koreans. Hope this helps anybody who is in a similar situation.
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gyopogirlfromtexas



Joined: 21 Apr 2007
Location: Austin,Texas

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 10:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

casinoman wrote:
, i was told that i had to formally renounce my korean citizenship. this is easy enough to do as the ministry of justice has a counter on the first floor. however, my proof of canadian citizenship was not enough, i had to go to the canadian embassy to get some sort of letter that states when my canadian citizenship was granted (cost 42,500 won). homer, if your name is on your family's hojuck, you are technically considered a korean citizen (even if you were not born in korea). so i am currently waiting for this document from the canadian embassy before i can proceed. i do believe it is easier to get this visa while in korea though as the korean consulate in vancouver told me that all this documentation had to be processed in korea anyway. hope some of this helps.


I'm a naturalized American citizen, but I'm a bit confused. When my brother sent me the family tree or hojuk, I saw my name on there, my mom is divorced from my biological Korean dad (she was there but not on there anymore so hopefully I don't need proof of her becoming an American citizen. ) But my brother, there was some korean letters in parenthesis, I asked my mom what that meant, she said that means he is no longer a Korean citizen. But it didn't have that for me, so I guess they still think I am.

How do you formally renounce the Korean citizenship. I 've done it decades ago when I got my American naturalization citizenship form. I had to swear by the bible and sign that I want to sign away my Korean citizenship. Wouldn't this be the renouncing part. So would my naturalization form for getting my us citizenship be counted as renouncing the Korean citizenship?

So my brother called me, he said I have to go renounce the korean citizenship. I asked why when I'm not even a Korean citizen anymore. I have papers and an American passport. How can I be a Korean citizen. So I'm worried of how long it'd take me to renounce it if I have to. Where would I renounce it?
'
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pkang0202



Joined: 09 Mar 2007

PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 6:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1018.html

Under a new law that went into effect on May 26, 2005, men who have dual citizenship may be required to serve in the military before they can give up their Korean citizenship. Women are not required to serve in the military.

The new law affects American men of Korean descent in different ways.

*
A Korean male, who was born in Korea, emigrates to the U.S. and becomes a naturalized American citizen, loses his Korean citizenship and therefore has no military obligations in Korea.
*
A male who was born in the U.S., whose Korean parents were U.S. citizens at the time of his birth, does not have Korean military obligations.
*
A male who was born in the U.S., whose name is on the Korean Family Census Register, and whose parents were not American citizens at the time of his birth but immigrated to and live in the U.S., is not obligated to serve in the Korean military if he renounces his Korean citizenship prior to March 30 of the year he turns 18 years of age.
*
A male who was born in the U.S. and is on the Korean Family Census Register, whose Korean citizen parents lived only temporarily outside Korea, may not renounce his Korean citizenship until he completes his service in the Korean military.
*
A U.S. citizen male who was born in and lives in Korea and is on the Korean Family Census Register may not renounce his Korean citizenship until he serves in the Korean military.
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peachlily



Joined: 11 Apr 2008

PostPosted: Thu Apr 17, 2008 6:24 pm    Post subject: I had no idea I was eligible for an F-4!? Reply with quote

Hi all,


A recruiter just emailed me and said I could get an F-4!? which is a better option if one could get it apparently.


So my question is seeing that the required documents are:
--A copy of your parent's US naturalization papers
--A copy of your parent's Family Census Register (Hojuk Deungbohn) showing that they have given up their Korean nationality

What exactly is the Family Census Register??! How does she know she has one?



Thanks


Last edited by peachlily on Fri Jul 23, 2010 9:09 am; edited 1 time in total
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peachlily



Joined: 11 Apr 2008

PostPosted: Thu Apr 17, 2008 11:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BTW, I've never been to Korea.
I don't know if that makes a difference with the F-4's or not.

Hopefully I can get my mother to cooperate.
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T-dot



Joined: 16 May 2004
Location: bundang

PostPosted: Fri Apr 18, 2008 1:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you're female it doesn't matter.

If you're male; then it matters.

1 If you're on the hojuk; just denounce your Korean citizenship, then go to the military office and fill out a simple form (military exemption form).

2) If you're not on it, just provide proof of your parents "new" citizenship. ie naturalization documents. Then apply for your F-4.
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