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4 Basic English Pronunciation Rules

 
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EnglishLCI



Joined: 20 Aug 2009
Posts: 49
Location: Denver, Colorado

PostPosted: Tue Jun 29, 2010 11:03 am    Post subject: 4 Basic English Pronunciation Rules Reply with quote

Here we show you several basic English pronunciation rules to help you during your classes at your ESL School and in your practice time alone. Make your practice a dynamic and effective one by looking for new words these rules apply to:

1. Pronunciation of the “Y”

“Y” is pronounced as ‘ai’ or ‘i:’.

- In one-syllable words, “Y” is pronounced as ‘ai’. For example: my, by, fly, shy, sky, dry, cry, fry, and try.

- In two-syllable words, “Y” is pronounced as ‘i:’. As example: happy, funny, baby, bony, puppy, party, tiny, city, candy, berry, penny, and turkey.

2. Pronunciation of the “C”

“C” is pronounced as ‘s’ or ‘k’. For example: city, cider, circle, and country.

- When an “E” or “Y” follow the “C”, it is pronounced as ‘s’. Good examples are: cellar, center, cent, ice, cycle, cell, cypress, and cyclone.

- When an “O”, “U”, or “A” follows the “C”, it is pronounced as ‘k’. Some examples are: cold, country, computer, couple, cup, curb, cut, cap, can, and cat.

Read these sentences aloud and compare both sounds:

_ The city is cloudy.

_ The center is covered.

_ We cycle in the city but drive the car in the country.

3. Pronunciation of the “G”

- When an “E”, “I”, or “Y” follows the “G”, it is pronounced as ‘ʤ’. Examples are: gym, giant, gem, gorgeous, and George.

- When a “U” or “A” follows the “G”, it is pronounced as ‘’ or ‘ζ’. For example: gun, gum, gas, garden, and gap.

4. Pronunciation of vowel letters

- The long “A” and the short “A”, for example: cape and gap.
-at: bat, cat, hat, fat, sat, rat
-ad: bad, had, mad, sad
-ag: tag, wag, rag, bag
-an: fan, pan, can, ran
-am: jam, ham, ram, yam
-ap: map, tap, nap

When the word ends in “E”, the “A” is pronounced as a long vowel. Examples of this are: rake, gate, face, base, cage, wave, and take.

When the word ends in “R”, the “A” sound is as in: tar, jar, car, and far.

- The long “I” and the short “I”.
-id: bid, kid, lid, did
-ig: big, rig, wig, pig, dig
-in: pin, fin, tin, win, bin
-ip: tip, lip, hip, rip, dip
-it: kit, hit, fit, sit, pit

When the word ends in “E”, the “I” is pronounced as a long vowel. For example: kite, bike, dime, ride, and vine.

- The long “O” and the short “O”.
-og: fog, hog, dog, jog, log
-op: mop, pop, hop, top
-ot: hot, pot, got, not
-ob: mob, cob, job, sob

When the word ends in “E”, the “O” is pronounced as a long vowel. As examples: rose, pole, and hope.

- The long “U” and the short “U”.
-ut: pup, cup, put, up, rut, hut, cut, nut
-ub: cub, tub
-us: bus, pus
-un: fun, sun, run, bun, gun
-ug: mug, bug, tug, hug

When the word ends in “E”, the “O” is pronounced as a long vowel. Examples: tune, cube, and cute.

If you liked this article, tell all your friends about it. They’ll thank you for it. If you have a blog or website, you can link to it or even post it to your own site (don’t forget to mention our ESL blog as the original source).

Rachel Clarkson
Rachel Clarkson is an English teacher at LCI English ESL Programs and blogger at the ESL Blog.
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LCI offers the best ESL classes through experienced teachers and high quality programs in Denver, Colorado. Check out great ESL resources and articles at www.englishlci.com/blog
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Lorikeet



Joined: 08 Oct 2005
Posts: 1582
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Jun 29, 2010 7:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you forgot to add "i" after "c" to make an "s" sound, but I was afraid to edit your comment in case you left it out on purpose.
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