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holding one's moneybag to oneself

 
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imchongjun



Joined: 14 Nov 2005
Posts: 120

PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2017 5:10 pm    Post subject: holding one's moneybag to oneself Reply with quote

I am curious to know the meaning of the following sentence.

Money is supposed to make amends to a man for everything,-- and even the wealthy wife of a certain Irish 'patriot' has not found it incompatible with affection to hold her moneybags close to herself while her husband has been declared a bankrupt. (from The Sorrows of Satan by Marie Corelli)

Does the phrase "to hold her moneybags close to herself" mean, in short, that she does not give any money to her bankrupt husband?
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Lorikeet



Joined: 08 Oct 2005
Posts: 1783
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2017 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's what it sounds like to me. I haven't heard that expression before.
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imchongjun



Joined: 14 Nov 2005
Posts: 120

PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 2017 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for answering, Lorikeet.
If you do not mind, I have another question.
How is the first part "money making amends for everything" connected with the second part "wife not giving money to her bankrupt husband"? Is this episode referred to as an example of "money making amends for everything"? Thanks to your suggestion, I think I now understand the literal meaning of this passage, but I am not quite sure about the thread or flow of the logic. Let me cite a longer passage which includes the original quote.

"Truly I have suffered"--I said--"More than most men!"
"More even than most millionaires deserve to suffer!" declared Lucio, with that inevitable touch of sarcasm which distinguished some of his friendliest remarks--"Money is supposed to make amends to a man for everything,-- and even the wealthy wife of a certain Irish 'patriot' has not found it incompatible with affection to hold her moneybags close to herself while her husband has been declared a bankrupt. How she has 'idolized' him, let others say! Now, considering _your_ cash-abundance,it must be owned the fates have treated you somewhat unkindly!"
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Lorikeet



Joined: 08 Oct 2005
Posts: 1783
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 10:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't want you to think I didn't pay attention to your question, but truthfully, I don't really know what it means. To me, it is poorly written. Maybe it is an old text or British English, but it is difficult for me to catch the meaning.
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imchongjun



Joined: 14 Nov 2005
Posts: 120

PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2017 6:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I appreciate your answer very much, Lorikeet. The quotation is from Marie Corelli's The Sorrows of Satan written at the end of the 19th century. I am beginning to think that something is missing from the text. Thanks to your frank answer I understand that this is a difficult passage. No wonder I don't understand! I really thank you for trying to answer. I wish you a very happy Valentine's day!!
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rogerrowles



Joined: 24 Jan 2017
Posts: 6
Location: Boise, Idaho, USA

PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2017 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi imchongjun!

You certainly choose some difficult reading material!

Let me take a shot:

I think Lucio is twisting the real meaning around. He is sympathetic to Tempest and his problems, saying that he has suffered despite having money, which is supposed to alleviate suffering. At the same time, he offers an example that is actually a case of incredible selfishness (the woman not helping her husband with money). It seems Lucio is trying to justify the selfishness with Tempest's suffering despite being rich.

That is my best guess anyway. I haven't read the whole book, but since Lucio is considered to be the incarnation of the Devil, it makes sense.

I hope that helps!
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imchongjun



Joined: 14 Nov 2005
Posts: 120

PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2017 3:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you, rogerrowles, for your kind answer. Having read it, I tried to understand the passage again. Let me rephrase it so that you can judge whether my interpretation is ok or not.

Money is supposed to make amends to a man for everything,
→ Money is supposed to alleviate any form of suffering,

-- and even the wealthy wife of a certain Irish 'patriot' has not found it incompatible with affection to hold her moneybags close to herself while her husband has been declared a bankrupt.
→ Look at the case of the wealthy wife of a certain bankrupt husband. Even she can be happy and keep an affectionate relationship with her husband precisely because she (selfishly) keeps her money to herself.

How she has 'idolized' him, let others say!
→ (I am not quite sure about this sentence, too) Other people make sarcastic comments about her love to her husband, but who cares?

Now, considering _your_ cash-abundance,it must be owned the fates have treated you somewhat unkindly!
→ It is surely very unfair of fates to inflict you with such suffering that money cannot compensate.
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rogerrowles



Joined: 24 Jan 2017
Posts: 6
Location: Boise, Idaho, USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2017 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, that is a good summary. At least, that is how I interpret the passage. The great thing about literature is that there is no wrong or right answer. The meaning of any text speaks to different people at different times in their lives.
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imchongjun



Joined: 14 Nov 2005
Posts: 120

PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2017 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you so much, rogerrowls and Lorikeet. I think I got it.
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