Site Search:
 
Dave's ESL Cafe's Student Discussion Forums Forum Index Dave's ESL Cafe's Student Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Oliver Twist: chapter 12

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Dave's ESL Cafe's Student Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Literature
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
crliu



Joined: 18 May 2003
Posts: 16

PostPosted: Fri Sep 19, 2003 7:49 pm    Post subject: Oliver Twist: chapter 12 Reply with quote

Hello, All:

I have immense difficulty in understanding the Charles D.'s commentary in Chapter 12. The two paragraphs begin right after Oliver fainted at Mr. Brownlow's house. Can anyone please help? Thanks.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Corey



Joined: 23 Mar 2003
Posts: 446
Location: Costa Rica

PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2003 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe if you posted the two paragraphs someone could help. Very Happy

Corey
_________________
Niagara Summer Programs
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
crliu



Joined: 18 May 2003
Posts: 16

PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2003 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, Corey, thank you for your reply. Here are the two difficult paragraphs I encountered while reading chapter 12 of "Oliver Twist". Please help. Thanks again.

That when the Dodger, and his accomplished friend Master Bates, joined in the hue-and-cry which was raised at Oliver's heels, in consequence of their executing an illegal conveyance of Mr. Brownlow's personal property, as has been already described, they were actuated by a very laudable and becoming regard for themselves; and forasmuch as the freedom of the subject and the liberty of the individual are among the first and proudest boasts of a true-hearted Englishman, so, I need hardly beg the reader to observe, that this action should tend to exalt them in the opinion of all public and patriotic men, in almost as great a degree as this strong proof of their anxiety for their own preservation and safety goes to corroborate and confirm the little code of laws which certain profound and sound-judging philosophers have laid down as the mainsprings of all Nature's deeds and actions: the said philosophers very wisely reducing the good lady's proceedings to matters of maxim and theory: and, by a very neat and pretty compliment to her exalted wisdom and understanding, putting entirely out of sight any considerations of heart, or generous impulse and feeling. For, these are matters totally beneath a female who is acknowledged by universal admission to be far above the numerous little foibles and weaknesses of her sex.

If I wanted any further proof of the strictly philosophical nature of the conduct of these young gentlemen in their very delicate predicament, I should at once find it in the fact (also recorded in a foregoing part of this narrative), of their quitting the pursuit, when the general attention was fixed upon Oliver; and making immediately for their home by the shortest possible cut. Although I do not mean to assert that it is usually the practice of renowned and learned sages, to shorten the road to any great conclusion (their course indeed being rather to lengthen the distance, by various circumlocutions and discursive staggerings, like unto those in which drunken men under the pressure of a too mighty flow of ideas, are prone to indulge); still, I do mean to say, and do say distinctly, that it is the invariable practice of many mighty philosophers, in carrying out their theories, to evince great wisdom and foresight in providing against every possible contingency which can be supposed at all likely to affect themselves. Thus, to do a great right, you may do a little wrong; and you may take any means which the end to be attained will justify; the amount of the right, or the amount of the wrong, or indeed the distinction between the two, being left entirely to the philosopher concerned, to be settled and determined by his clear, comprehensive, and impartial view of his own particular case.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
crliu



Joined: 18 May 2003
Posts: 16

PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2003 11:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello, All,

In "the freedom of the subject and the liberty of the individual" mentioned in the first paragraph, does the "subject" mean a citizen of the British Empire?

Also, in "reducing the good lady's proceedings to ..." mentioned in the first paragraph, does "the good lady" mean Nature?

Thanks in advance for your help.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Dave's ESL Cafe's Student Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Literature All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Dave's ESL Cafe is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Banner Advertising | Bookstore / Alta Books | FAQs | Articles | Interview with Dave
Copyright © 1995-2011 Dave's ESL Cafe | All Rights Reserved | Contact Dave's ESL Cafe | Site Map

Teachers College, Columbia University: Train to Teach English Here or Abroad
SIT
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group