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How was your country food on NEW YEAR'S DAY???
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minomino



Joined: 25 Sep 2006
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 3:30 am    Post subject: How was your country food on NEW YEAR'S DAY??? Reply with quote

Hi! I'm Japnese girl. Very Happy
It will come soon NEW YEAR'S DAY
I'm looking forward to new years days Laughing

In Japan,many people enjoy themselves on new year's day.Paticulary,Japanese enjoy special food.
For example, we make rice cake,what is called "Mochi".Rice cake is abundantly popular food.Additionally,we eat rice-cake soup.Both food is very interesting andtypical Japanese culture. Maybe most Japanese like them Very Happy
Also,a lot of Japanese have special new years Japanese lunch box,which is called "OSECHI".It's very traditional food.The dishes differ from one area to another but often include black beans and herring eggs.

How was your country food on NEW YEAR'S DAY???Laughing
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Anuradha Chepur



Joined: 20 May 2006
Posts: 932

PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2006 3:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

People mostly eat a lot of Indian snacks, bakery stuff, potato wafers and other fast foods.
Or famous Indian rice preparation called "Biryani".
Vegans eat Cauliflower manchuria, spring rolls, etc.
Others eat Chicken-65, chicken manchuria, prawns, etc.
A lot of them get drunk.
Those who don't take alcohol drink Coke.
We have community/family/friends get- togethers with dance, music, cultural programmes, etc.
Some people watch special programmes on TV.
Some people enjoy at the pubs, discotheques, clubs, hotels, etc.
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minomino



Joined: 25 Sep 2006
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2007 8:14 pm    Post subject: It looks intersting!! Reply with quote

Thank you Anuradha Very Happy And Happy New Year Laughing
I could feel New Year's costom is very differnt in country .
When I hear your country costom in India, I' intersted in your country culture,uch as,food,singing and dancing. I want to eat these food and watch dacing and isten to singing. in Japan ,adults give some money to children,it's called "Otosidama ". So most children is loking forward to New years day. What other do you have any costom in India??? Question
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Anuradha Chepur



Joined: 20 May 2006
Posts: 932

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 12:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, Mino, we have our own new years in India, which is different in the different regions and cultures. In my regional culture, the new year (called Ugadi) falls some day in March/April. It is mostly a religious affair. Indian calenders are lunar and we follow them for purposes of religion, festivals, horoscopes, fixing up weddings, etc.

As everywhere else, we follow the Christian era for all official purposes.
The Christian new year is mostly associated with fun.

You can watch Bollywood (Hindi) movies if you want to see the songs and dances. Watch Devdas, Hum dil de chuke sanam, Bunty aur Babli, Hum apke hai kaun, Main hoon na, etc.
Song and dance is an essential ingredient of Indian films, just as action scenes are important to English films. But it is because of the song and dance scenes that Indian films don't get Oscars; probably the Oscar judges don't like them.

If you have Indian restaurants in your place, you can try out Biryani, Chole, Dosa, Idli, or whatever else is available.
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simplyblessedwithlove



Joined: 23 Apr 2004
Posts: 125
Location: bay area, california

PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anuradha Chepur wrote:
People mostly eat a lot of Indian snacks, bakery stuff, potato wafers and other fast foods.
Or famous Indian rice preparation called "Biryani".

I LOVE biryani (and tandoori chicken or naan *drooling*). My previous boss was a Pakistani lady who made really good biryani. She said Pakistani biryani is way better than of Indian. I wonder what are the differences... Confused
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Anuradha Chepur



Joined: 20 May 2006
Posts: 932

PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 2:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I eat vegetable biryani, and Indians cook it well. I didn't get opportunity to taste Biryani cooked by a Pakistani.
As for Chicken/meat biryani, I don't think there is any gross difference between Indian and Pakistani biryani.
Both could be equally good.
If your Pakistani boss thinks that Pakistani biryani is better than the
Indian one, then probably that is her way of showing her patriotism.

Biryani is also called pulao. Kashimiri pulao is awesome. In it, they put saffron, dry fruits and fruit slices.
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Oriani



Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 208
Location: Venezuela

PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 7:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent! In my country we eat at Christmas season and for the New year's Eve/day a traditional dish which is call HALLACAS

I hope you take a look at it Wink
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Anuradha Chepur



Joined: 20 May 2006
Posts: 932

PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 11:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had a look at your Hallacas.
I remember, my grandmother used to prepare a similar dish.
She used to wrap something in colocasia leaves then deep fry them.
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Philo Kevetch



Joined: 01 Feb 2006
Posts: 564

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 4:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Boudin blanc" (white blood sausage) is a traditional New Years' meal ...and of course... a good bottle of wine to go with it! Happy New Years to all...Philo
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simplyblessedwithlove



Joined: 23 Apr 2004
Posts: 125
Location: bay area, california

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anuradha Chepur wrote:
I eat vegetable biryani, and Indians cook it well. I didn't get opportunity to taste Biryani cooked by a Pakistani.
As for Chicken/meat biryani, I don't think there is any gross difference between Indian and Pakistani biryani.
Both could be equally good.
If your Pakistani boss thinks that Pakistani biryani is better than the
Indian one, then probably that is her way of showing her patriotism.

Biryani is also called pulao. Kashimiri pulao is awesome. In it, they put saffron, dry fruits and fruit slices.

I haven't tried vegetable biryani yet, so I don't know how good it is. I've tried chicken biryani from both sides, Indian's and Pakistani's. The difference is that I've tried Indian chicken biryani in Indian restaurants while I've tried Pakistani chicken biryani at my boss's house and my friends' houses. Too bad that I don't have any Indian friends to be able to try the homemade one. It'd be more reasonable to compare two homemade's. Crying or Very sad
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Len T.
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Anuradha Chepur



Joined: 20 May 2006
Posts: 932

PostPosted: Sun Jan 07, 2007 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We get good biryani in the restaurants in Hyderabad, though.
A place called "Bawarchi" is the most famous restaurant for Biryani.
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Oriani



Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 208
Location: Venezuela

PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2007 1:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anuradha Chepur wrote:
I had a look at your Hallacas.
I remember, my grandmother used to prepare a similar dish.
She used to wrap something in colocasia leaves then deep fry them.

Oh really?? where is she from?
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simplyblessedwithlove



Joined: 23 Apr 2004
Posts: 125
Location: bay area, california

PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2007 8:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anuradha Chepur wrote:
We get good biryani in the restaurants in Hyderabad, though.
A place called "Bawarchi" is the most famous restaurant for Biryani.

How far is that place from where you live? And one question I'd like to ask you, can you make biryani without yogurt? Confused
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Len T.
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Anuradha Chepur



Joined: 20 May 2006
Posts: 932

PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2007 11:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oriani, I am an Indian, and so was my grandmother.

Simplyblessedwithlove:
Quote:
How far is that place from where you live? And one question I'd like to ask you, can you make biryani without yogurt?


I live in Hyderabad and Bawarchi Restaurant is close to my office.
Yes, you can make biryani without yoghurt too.
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simplyblessedwithlove



Joined: 23 Apr 2004
Posts: 125
Location: bay area, california

PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2007 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You know what, I think this is the difference here. The biryani my boss cooked didn't have yogurt, but the one at the restaurant did. That's why the restaurant's biryani seemed quite wet while the other biryani was kinda dried and non-oily.

Like my family when we were in Vietnam, we only ate this traditional dish for New Year on New Year only. However, when we came to the States, my mom has cooked it on regular days, too. And she throws in eggs also.
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Len T.
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