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I worried Japanese education.

 
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minomino



Joined: 25 Sep 2006
Posts: 22

PostPosted: Sun Nov 12, 2006 7:15 pm    Post subject: I worried Japanese education. Reply with quote

HI!
I'm Japanese student Very Happy

Nowaday,it is reported to suicide caused by bullying everyday Crying or Very sad

It is not child but teacher to suicide.

I think that to kill myself is the sadset and cruelest .

Iwant to help the suffering  childen Crying or Very sad

HOw do you think about to suicide caused by bullying ?
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alper



Joined: 22 Mar 2006
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Location: istanbul - Türkiye

PostPosted: Sun Nov 12, 2006 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't accept any sort of suicide. but there are lots of cruel things in our world. and I can't understand bullying. why there is.
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ClarissaMach



Joined: 18 May 2006
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Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2006 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Japanese society (as well as the American one, by the way) should take a look out of its borders to see what other peope (societies) are doing different. I mean, bullying is not that common in other societies as it seems to be in the USA and in Japan. The diference between these two countries is that, while in Japan people kill themselves, in America they grasp a gun and kill not only themselves but other innocent people around them... and this is news...

Would it be the "don't-be-a-loser" fever that is driving teens crazy?
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flying_pig319



Joined: 01 Jul 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2006 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ClarissaMach wrote:

Would it be the "don't-be-a-loser" fever that is driving teens crazy?


As a teen, I'd say yes.
Definitely.

There's so much pressure. Not the clear-cut kinds you hear about like, "If you don't do drugs we'll beat you up" or "If you don't beat that kid up we'll tell everyone you're a loser", but much more subtle, complex things the media has no idea about.
The way you talk, even. Don't sound too confident, but don't sound too unconfident. The way you walk- don't strut your stuff, but don't be afraid of your body. Your financial situation- it's good to be rich, but not cool to have everything done for you. The amount of time you spend talking in a conversation has to be proportionate to how high up you are on the hierarchy. Certain styles you have to be cool enough to pull off... All these little nuances!
I don't think you can get it if you're not a teen.
Maybe other teens on here will have some idea what I'm talking about? Maybe not, and I just totally overanalyze the world Wink

Back to suicide- I feel very sorry for people who do kill themselves. It makes me very sad to think that people could feel so bad that they'd want to die. In America, one of the richest countries? People want to die? It's awful.
A girl I knew committed suicide. She jumped off a bridge. It was very sad.
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BourneNOIR



Joined: 12 Apr 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2006 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, two posts in less than 2 weeks about Japanese bullying and suicide... I think it really is a serious problem. Shocked

Yeah, pressure is definitely a factor. I think the way the society over-protects the children sometimes could be a contributing factor to the way the children react to these pressure.

Just recently (last month) I saw on the news that there are places where schools are banning Tag as a playground game because school officials "fear [the children will] get hurt and hold the school liable." I think that is ridiculous beyond imagination... Winning and losing is part of life, and getting hurt either emotionally or physically is part of growing up. I was also surprised that dodgeball was also banned in many schools because the losing students will have low self-esteem (probably due to being hit by a ball?).

In the end, these over-protected children will not have learned the skills necessary to handle and recover from low self-esteem and emotional stress. They either end up taking their own life or retaliate against the people seem to have better lives than they do. I'm guessing that people in less protected parts of the world have less problem with suicide and bullying since survival is a skill that people learn young and suicide contradicts the will to survive. People have already seen the worst, and they know how to deal with many social pressures in the world.

Of course those are just my pure speculations and opinions, and they apply only to what I've observed here in the US. I don't know about Japan that much other than bullying in movies like Battle Royale, Fast and Furious: Tokyo Drift, some manga and anime, etc.

Minomino, could you describe what's you think is happening in Japanese schools that may be causing bullying and suicide?
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flying_pig319



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2006 7:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BourneNOIR wrote:
I was also surprised that dodgeball was also banned in many schools because the losing students will have low self-esteem (probably due to being hit by a ball?).


Actually, I think it's very wise to ban dodgeball in school.
(Bear in mind that my position may be biased, being an athletically-challenged person from an athletically-challenged family).

It's not the physical pain that makes me hate dodgeball, but the emotional pain:

In dodgeball, teams are picked. (By students). "Last picked for dodgeball" is a commonly coined phrase in my family, just used to mean the stereotypical nerdy, unathletic kid (which everyone in my family is/was, for the most part). Really. It's cruel for a kid to see so plainly how he/she ranks in the popularity hierarchy (that IS what kids pick players based on) of gym class. The agony of hoping you're not picked dead last is really awful. It's like seeing your pitiful juniorhighschool fate drawn out before you- "you're the most loserish kid in the class". Plain and simple, illustrated in the non-abstract form of picking players for dodgeball. (Adding to the humiliation: Everyone else in the gym class can see that you're picked last).

Also, if being picked worst/near worst isn't bad enough, kids also get to choose who to aim for. Of course, if you're unathletic, you're an easy target, and get aimed at a LOT. Yes, yes, it's all just part of the game, but if you're the insecure nerd (and I say that lovingly, really) you don't see it like that-- you see it as: everyone hates you.

It IS just a game, but maybe my little nerd-memoir will help you see it from someone else's eyes...

---

I see what you're saying, Noir, about how kids need to learn to deal with rejection etc., but don't you think this form (dodgeball) is a little harsh? Basing success/failure on physical endurance is so primitive, and (unlike in the real world, which you are claiming rejection will prepare them for), those who fail are NOT able do work hard and improve themselves- people are BORN unathletic, and there's nothing they can do about it. In other words, if we were trying to simulate the "real world" for kids, so they can experience rejection and "toughen up" in advance, dodgeball would not be a good choice for a simulation setting. The real world is not based on physical strength, and in the real world, you can improve your position by working hard at it (in theory, anyway), and you cannot improve your athletic abilities if you're born unathletic.

How about school for real-world-simulation/preparation purposes? Grades CAN be improved (to an extent) by simple hard work, and although some people are born *smarter* (for lack of a better word) than others, grades are loophole-able enough that even those who aren't as academically-capable can still easily manage to get good grades just by working at it. Socially, social rejection in a school setting is much more similar to social rejection in a work setting than dodgeball is, don't you think?

I think you're placing too much weight on playground games to prepare children for adulthood- we have school for that! Playground games and dodgeball-like games should be optional, and just-for-fun.



Sorry for such a looong post about such an obscure, not-really-that-interesting topic... And I think I may have been reading too far into/getting to caught up in what you had posted, Noir-- please don't be offended Smile
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BourneNOIR



Joined: 12 Apr 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2006 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

flying_pig319 wrote:
Actually, I think it's very wise to ban dodgeball in school.
(Bear in mind that my position may be biased, being an athletically-challenged person from an athletically-challenged family).

It's not the physical pain that makes me hate dodgeball, but the emotional pain:

In dodgeball, teams are picked. (By students). "Last picked for dodgeball" is a commonly coined phrase in my family, just used to mean the stereotypical nerdy, unathletic kid (which everyone in my family is/was, for the most part). Really. It's cruel for a kid to see so plainly how he/she ranks in the popularity hierarchy (that IS what kids pick players based on) of gym class. The agony of hoping you're not picked dead last is really awful. It's like seeing your pitiful juniorhighschool fate drawn out before you- "you're the most loserish kid in the class". Plain and simple, illustrated in the non-abstract form of picking players for dodgeball. (Adding to the humiliation: Everyone else in the gym class can see that you're picked last).

Also, if being picked worst/near worst isn't bad enough, kids also get to choose who to aim for. Of course, if you're unathletic, you're an easy target, and get aimed at a LOT. Yes, yes, it's all just part of the game, but if you're the insecure nerd (and I say that lovingly, really) you don't see it like that-- you see it as: everyone hates you.

It IS just a game, but maybe my little nerd-memoir will help you see it from someone else's eyes...

---

I see what you're saying, Noir, about how kids need to learn to deal with rejection etc., but don't you think this form (dodgeball) is a little harsh? Basing success/failure on physical endurance is so primitive, and (unlike in the real world, which you are claiming rejection will prepare them for), those who fail are NOT able do work hard and improve themselves- people are BORN unathletic, and there's nothing they can do about it. In other words, if we were trying to simulate the "real world" for kids, so they can experience rejection and "toughen up" in advance, dodgeball would not be a good choice for a simulation setting. The real world is not based on physical strength, and in the real world, you can improve your position by working hard at it (in theory, anyway), and you cannot improve your athletic abilities if you're born unathletic.

How about school for real-world-simulation/preparation purposes? Grades CAN be improved (to an extent) by simple hard work, and although some people are born *smarter* (for lack of a better word) than others, grades are loophole-able enough that even those who aren't as academically-capable can still easily manage to get good grades just by working at it. Socially, social rejection in a school setting is much more similar to social rejection in a work setting than dodgeball is, don't you think?

I think you're placing too much weight on playground games to prepare children for adulthood- we have school for that! Playground games and dodgeball-like games should be optional, and just-for-fun.



Sorry for such a looong post about such an obscure, not-really-that-interesting topic... And I think I may have been reading too far into/getting to caught up in what you had posted, Noir-- please don't be offended Smile

Haha, no offense taken and don't be sorry for expressing your feelings. I understand how you feel. I'm actually not that different from you, believe it or not. Yes, you're reading a bit too much into my post, but I understand where you're coming from. I was commenting on the ban, not on the idea that they should use dodgeball as a teaching tool. I'm not a proponent of dodgeball. I'm an opponent of the ban. I merely want to say exactly what you said:
flying_pig319 wrote:
Playground games and dodgeball-like games should be optional, and just-for-fun.

Students should not be forced to play it and schools should also provide alternatives. The ban, to me, is overkill. It may do justice for students lacking in athletic/physical abilities, but what about those who want to "play hard" play a "test of athletic abilities"?

Even in baseball you have students who can't bat, can't throw, can't catch, and can't run. Student also have to choose teams, there will always be "the last one to be picked". Even for academic teams or something as innocuous as spelling-bee contest, there will be people whose self-esteem get hurt for being laughed-at and rejected. Should we ban all competitions that could potentially cause low self-esteem in students? Life is pretty much random, as much as we want to pick out the type of challenges we want to face, we can't predict whether the next one will be physical or mental. If the next unexpected challenge happens to be mental or physical and we're unprepared for it, we have to know how to get back on our feet. It's not so much dealing with the challenge, but learning to cope with failure.

I came to the US when I was 8, and the first city I lived in was (of all places) NYC. The saying "if you can make it here, you can make it anywhere" pretty much sums up my experiences. I was picked on by African-American, Russian, Italian, and Hispanic students since they all perceived me as the stereotypical good-in-math, non-athletic, nerdy, Asian student. Plus, with my broken English I was also pick last most of the time. Still, I tried to enjoy myself, make friends with other students (yes, other nerdy students). As a matter of fact, I tend to befriend less fortunate students to make them feel that at least they've got someone on their side. I guess it all depends on how one's brought up.

Haha, if I continue I'll sound like I'm preaching. Different people have different experiences and will react to challenges and failures differently. I understand that dodgeball may not be a good sport and that people should have the right to choose. But to ban dodgeball in the name to "protect" students' self-esteem removes the right to choose for those who want to play. Not everyone has the same aptitude to learn things, academic or not. As long as there are situations where people have to choose teams, someone will be chosen last. In a utopian society, everyone's a winner. But in reality, there will be "losers". It all depends on how one defines/interprets "losing" to make a world of difference. "What does not kill me only makes me stronger."
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flying_pig319



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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 4:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BourneNOIR wrote:
flying_pig319 wrote:
Actually, I think it's very wise to ban dodgeball in school.
(Bear in mind that my position may be biased, being an athletically-challenged person from an athletically-challenged family).

It's not the physical pain that makes me hate dodgeball, but the emotional pain:

In dodgeball, teams are picked. (By students). "Last picked for dodgeball" is a commonly coined phrase in my family, just used to mean the stereotypical nerdy, unathletic kid (which everyone in my family is/was, for the most part). Really. It's cruel for a kid to see so plainly how he/she ranks in the popularity hierarchy (that IS what kids pick players based on) of gym class. The agony of hoping you're not picked dead last is really awful. It's like seeing your pitiful juniorhighschool fate drawn out before you- "you're the most loserish kid in the class". Plain and simple, illustrated in the non-abstract form of picking players for dodgeball. (Adding to the humiliation: Everyone else in the gym class can see that you're picked last).

Also, if being picked worst/near worst isn't bad enough, kids also get to choose who to aim for. Of course, if you're unathletic, you're an easy target, and get aimed at a LOT. Yes, yes, it's all just part of the game, but if you're the insecure nerd (and I say that lovingly, really) you don't see it like that-- you see it as: everyone hates you.

It IS just a game, but maybe my little nerd-memoir will help you see it from someone else's eyes...

---

I see what you're saying, Noir, about how kids need to learn to deal with rejection etc., but don't you think this form (dodgeball) is a little harsh? Basing success/failure on physical endurance is so primitive, and (unlike in the real world, which you are claiming rejection will prepare them for), those who fail are NOT able do work hard and improve themselves- people are BORN unathletic, and there's nothing they can do about it. In other words, if we were trying to simulate the "real world" for kids, so they can experience rejection and "toughen up" in advance, dodgeball would not be a good choice for a simulation setting. The real world is not based on physical strength, and in the real world, you can improve your position by working hard at it (in theory, anyway), and you cannot improve your athletic abilities if you're born unathletic.

How about school for real-world-simulation/preparation purposes? Grades CAN be improved (to an extent) by simple hard work, and although some people are born *smarter* (for lack of a better word) than others, grades are loophole-able enough that even those who aren't as academically-capable can still easily manage to get good grades just by working at it. Socially, social rejection in a school setting is much more similar to social rejection in a work setting than dodgeball is, don't you think?

I think you're placing too much weight on playground games to prepare children for adulthood- we have school for that! Playground games and dodgeball-like games should be optional, and just-for-fun.



Sorry for such a looong post about such an obscure, not-really-that-interesting topic... And I think I may have been reading too far into/getting to caught up in what you had posted, Noir-- please don't be offended Smile

Haha, no offense taken and don't be sorry for expressing your feelings. I understand how you feel. I'm actually not that different from you, believe it or not. Yes, you're reading a bit too much into my post, but I understand where you're coming from. I was commenting on the ban, not on the idea that they should use dodgeball as a teaching tool. I'm not a proponent of dodgeball. I'm an opponent of the ban. I merely want to say exactly what you said:
flying_pig319 wrote:
Playground games and dodgeball-like games should be optional, and just-for-fun.

Students should not be forced to play it and schools should also provide alternatives. The ban, to me, is overkill. It may do justice for students lacking in athletic/physical abilities, but what about those who want to "play hard" play a "test of athletic abilities"?

Even in baseball you have students who can't bat, can't throw, can't catch, and can't run. Student also have to choose teams, there will always be "the last one to be picked". Even for academic teams or something as innocuous as spelling-bee contest, there will be people whose self-esteem get hurt for being laughed-at and rejected. Should we ban all competitions that could potentially cause low self-esteem in students? Life is pretty much random, as much as we want to pick out the type of challenges we want to face, we can't predict whether the next one will be physical or mental. If the next unexpected challenge happens to be mental or physical and we're unprepared for it, we have to know how to get back on our feet. It's not so much dealing with the challenge, but learning to cope with failure.

I came to the US when I was 8, and the first city I lived in was (of all places) NYC. The saying "if you can make it here, you can make it anywhere" pretty much sums up my experiences. I was picked on by African-American, Russian, Italian, and Hispanic students since they all perceived me as the stereotypical good-in-math, non-athletic, nerdy, Asian student. Plus, with my broken English I was also pick last most of the time. Still, I tried to enjoy myself, make friends with other students (yes, other nerdy students). As a matter of fact, I tend to befriend less fortunate students to make them feel that at least they've got someone on their side. I guess it all depends on how one's brought up.

Haha, if I continue I'll sound like I'm preaching. Different people have different experiences and will react to challenges and failures differently. I understand that dodgeball may not be a good sport and that people should have the right to choose. But to ban dodgeball in the name to "protect" students' self-esteem removes the right to choose for those who want to play. Not everyone has the same aptitude to learn things, academic or not. As long as there are situations where people have to choose teams, someone will be chosen last. In a utopian society, everyone's a winner. But in reality, there will be "losers". It all depends on how one defines/interprets "losing" to make a world of difference. "What does not kill me only makes me stronger."


I think the "ban" implies something different than what you think it does...
In my highschool we have a ban on dodgeball, but it's only for curricular things like PE. We DO have an afterschool dodgeball league-type thing, which many students are involved in...
I think the schools (at least my school), let people play if they want to (AFTER school) but don't force people to play in their classes,
Which seems like a good arrangement to me! Smile

And, as I said in my previous post, the school situation is different. Some people will be born more/less capable, but your grades and position in school CAN be raised/lowered just by hard work. You do NOT have to be smart to get good grades in school- you just have to try hard. This is NOT true in gym class, right?
If it is, a 15-year old girl in North Carolina will be very upset that she spent all those agonizing years doing badly in gym class, when all she had to do was try harder... Wink
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BourneNOIR



Joined: 12 Apr 2006
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 7:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

flying_pig319 wrote:
I think the "ban" implies something different than what you think it does...
In my highschool we have a ban on dodgeball, but it's only for curricular things like PE. We DO have an afterschool dodgeball league-type thing, which many students are involved in...
I think the schools (at least my school), let people play if they want to (AFTER school) but don't force people to play in their classes,
Which seems like a good arrangement to me! Smile

Yeah, maybe we're thinking of this differently. In my school, at least in grade school, PE was a time when the teacher would bring out sport equipments and let everyone choose what they want to do. Some play basketball, others play kickball, some run around, while others just stand and talk. That's why a ban to me sounds like you're not even given an option to choose. Like I said, maybe grade school is different; the students are not graded for performance, just participation. Besides, each school/district/state implements its own PE curriculum.

flying_pig319 wrote:
And, as I said in my previous post, the school situation is different. Some people will be born more/less capable, but your grades and position in school CAN be raised/lowered just by hard work. You do NOT have to be smart to get good grades in school- you just have to try hard. This is NOT true in gym class, right?
If it is, a 15-year old girl in North Carolina will be very upset that she spent all those agonizing years doing badly in gym class, when all she had to do was try harder... Wink

While the purpose of gym classes in schools is not the topic of our discussion (the ban of dodgeball was - actually, bullying and suicide is the topic of this thread), I just want to address a few points. I don't know how it is in NC, but I believe PE should be graded on participation and the attempt to try rather than performance (at least that's the case in schools I've attended). Not everyone has the same aptitude to learn things, whether it's sports or academics. Hard work will certainly improve your grade to a certain extent, but there are still people who have learning advantage. Some students will understand a new concept immediately, while some require things spelled out to them. There are those who try hard and still do poorly on tests. I highly doubt that schools will ever grade exams based on attempts and participation. One can study really hard, does all the homework, understand all the concepts, does great job on projects, yet still does poorly on exams because that person is a horrible test-taker and hates the pressure and the stress in a timed test environment (i.e. me).

As a matter of fact, because PE is such a discriminating class due the difference in physical abilities of different students, there is no "right or wrong" answer. It would be wrong to expect all students to perform equally. Maybe your school is different, but if that's the case PE should be banned as well since it'll be discouraging for students lacking in physical abilities. Same thing can't be said about academics where grades rely heavily on exams, and exams are graded based on correct answers not on participation. Then again, it depends on how the school implements its PE curriculum.
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Bob S.



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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

flying_pig319 wrote:
I don't think you can get it if you're not a teen.
Maybe other teens on here will have some idea what I'm talking about? Maybe not, and I just totally overanalyze the world Wink
Don't write off us old fogies. It's been decades since I was a teen, but I know exactly what you mean. Be cool or be cast out. High school was just something to be endured till I could go on to university where I felt more at home. If living forever meant regenerating and having to re-live my teenage years again and again, I'd opt out and choose mortality. Fortunately it's just a short time in your overall life, but it is significant for learning what you need to know to get along as an adult. Some things I learned:
Nobody really wants to hear what you have to say. They are just waiting for you to finish talking so they can chime in with their own opinion.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt.
There are vile sadistic people in the world who get a kick out of making you suffer. Learn quickly who they are and where they hang out. (Hint: some are probably sitting next ot you in class.) Then avoid them. They probably have serious issues and you don't want to be a part of them.
Know your strengths and play to them. I have neither coordination nor stamina. So in P.E. when I had a choice in activities, I as often as possible chose weight training. If you are also "last picked in dodge ball" but at least have stamina, consider trying to get into track where you have a chance to shine.
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flying_pig319



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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 4:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BourneNOIR wrote:
flying_pig319 wrote:
I think the "ban" implies something different than what you think it does...
In my highschool we have a ban on dodgeball, but it's only for curricular things like PE. We DO have an afterschool dodgeball league-type thing, which many students are involved in...
I think the schools (at least my school), let people play if they want to (AFTER school) but don't force people to play in their classes,
Which seems like a good arrangement to me! Smile

Yeah, maybe we're thinking of this differently. In my school, at least in grade school, PE was a time when the teacher would bring out sport equipments and let everyone choose what they want to do. Some play basketball, others play kickball, some run around, while others just stand and talk. That's why a ban to me sounds like you're not even given an option to choose. Like I said, maybe grade school is different; the students are not graded for performance, just participation. Besides, each school/district/state implements its own PE curriculum.

Oh no- it's definitely NOT this relaxed in highschool or jr. high... Smile

BourneNOIR wrote:
flying_pig319 wrote:
And, as I said in my previous post, the school situation is different. Some people will be born more/less capable, but your grades and position in school CAN be raised/lowered just by hard work. You do NOT have to be smart to get good grades in school- you just have to try hard. This is NOT true in gym class, right?
If it is, a 15-year old girl in North Carolina will be very upset that she spent all those agonizing years doing badly in gym class, when all she had to do was try harder... Wink

While the purpose of gym classes in schools is not the topic of our discussion (the ban of dodgeball was - actually, bullying and suicide is the topic of this thread),

Yeah, we've gotten REALLY off-topic Smile
But it's all good- discussions are good.

BourneNOIR wrote:
I just want to address a few points. I don't know how it is in NC, but I believe PE should be graded on participation and the attempt to try rather than performance (at least that's the case in schools I've attended). Not everyone has the same aptitude to learn things, whether it's sports or academics.

Yes!!
I make this point all the time at home. I'm very glad that PE is graded like 75% just on trying hard and participation! It's lucky for me. But I also sort of think that school (academics, I mean) should be graded the same way- just trying hard. Why should people who cannot succeed in athletics be better off than those who cannot succeed in academics?

BourneNOIR wrote:
Hard work will certainly improve your grade to a certain extent, but there are still people who have learning advantage. Some students will understand a new concept immediately, while some require things spelled out to them.

It's true- this goes back to the point you were making before, though: That's just how life works.
Admittedly, though, it's very unfair to use the "that's just how life works" philosophy for academics but NOT for athletics...
Ok I'm done. No more arguing with myself aloud... Smile

BourneNOIR wrote:
There are those who try hard and still do poorly on tests. I highly doubt that schools will ever grade exams based on attempts and participation.

Yes, yes. This relates to the thing two paragraphs up...
We've exhausted this point Smile

BourneNOIR wrote:
One can study really hard, does all the homework, understand all the concepts, does great job on projects, yet still does poorly on exams because that person is a horrible test-taker and hates the pressure and the stress in a timed test environment (i.e. me).

I've had that problem before too.

BourneNOIR wrote:
As a matter of fact, because PE is such a discriminating class due the difference in physical abilities of different students, there is no "right or wrong" answer. It would be wrong to expect all students to perform equally. Maybe your school is different, but if that's the case PE should be banned as well since it'll be discouraging for students lacking in physical abilities. Same thing can't be said about academics where grades rely heavily on exams, and exams are graded based on correct answers not on participation. Then again, it depends on how the school implements its PE curriculum.

Yeessss. Academics and athletics should be treated/graded in a much more similar way, because for in both cases, some people have the skills and some don't. Genetically.

We've seriously exhausted this topic, haha Smile
Loooong discussions are good. I love the eslcafe.
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NeoYu



Joined: 14 Mar 2007
Posts: 15
Location: Zhuhai China

PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So serious topic,
I dislike it,
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kratos03344



Joined: 24 Mar 2007
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2007 7:08 pm    Post subject: You have my sympathy Reply with quote

So far as I know .Japanese education is very serious , and very rigid . you should get up everymoring to school and get back from school because of your burdensome housework . But your country 's economy is leading the world , so it's well worth the effort .
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Jekzhou



Joined: 15 Jun 2005
Posts: 51
Location: The Hague, The Netherlands

PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2007 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

lol I got bullied once in highschool few years back.
surely we fought, the next day I also fought him and so on and pick on him like putting glue on his chair hahaha. eventually I got dispelled for almost a month for causing trouble due the fights with him. He shouldn't have messed with me.

Why should 1 commit suicide just he/she got bullied i can't really understand? don't they have relatives,friends that they can come up with?

Running away from problems..really how soft are they...i just feel srry for their parents who going through all the hardship for raising.

self centered i would say
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Leon Young



Joined: 05 Sep 2006
Posts: 107
Location: Kunming,China

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yes, it depends on different people.if the one who has been bullied is monkey king,then the one who has done the bullying thing would regret greatly.
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